Should multi-sport athlete Kyler Murray pick baseball or football?

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Murray was drafted early in the first round by the A's on Monday.

- How about this story that had come out yesterday? We talked a little bit about it. Kyler Murray, the quarterback who is expected to succeed Baker Mayfield at Oklahoma, was drafted number nine overall to the Oakland Athletics. He's a center fielder. He had 10 home runs, had 10 stolen bases last year for Oklahoma in his first year at center field.

Drafted number nine overall to the Oakland Athletics. And the pay, the projected pay is like 4.7615.

- Right.

- Yeah, we would call that $4,761,500.

- Yes.

- And apparently, reading up on the rules a little bit, he can accept that money. He can have an agent represent him. He is not allowed to go out and get any marketing deals associated with it while still playing football for Oklahoma. And the agency business has to be only tied to his playing baseball.

- This is kind of--

- When does he get the money?

- He can get it now. He can start getting it now.

- He can-- but, he can-- while playing college football.

- Yes, there's a rule that allows for athletes to play professional baseball and receive money from their pro baseball franchise while maintaining amateur status in football.

- Right, Russell Wilson did this.

- Yes.

- Ricky Williams famously did this, played some college baseball while going to University of Texas.

- He just can't sign any commercial endorsement deals. Tough decision or not?

- What would be tough about doing both?

- I wanted to call him Skyler, Kyler.

- Kyler, yeah. Skyler makes more sense.

- Kyle.

- Yeah.

- What would be difficult about doing both? I guess the risk that you would injure yourself and lose out on the $4.7 million.

- I thought he got the money.

- Is it just fully guaranteed?

- That's guaranteed money. Yeah, that's a signing bonus.

- But while you're playing another sport, do you think that's fully guaranteed if you get injured playing another sport? I would imagine there's some type of clause in his contract.

- Well, I don't think there's a clause.

- You know, I know baseball contracts are notoriously fully guaranteed, but while you're playing college football, is it guaranteed against the injury?

- Well, if I'm Kyler Murray I'm continuing to play football. Now, if I if I had the money, if I had baseball, the money, or college football, I'm choosing baseball, and I'm taking the money. There is zero guarantee, especially for a guy who is somewhat undersized, for Kyler Murray.

- He's five foot ten.

- Five foot ten.

- And he's a quarterback.

- And a quarterback.

- Although he's the first person ever to play in the, I think it was the Under Armor All-American game for baseball and something of equal status for the football. The first player to ever do this. So he's pretty exceptional as far as his talent level goes. So you can't necessarily discount him just because he's five foot ten.

- Remember the CU punt returner from Colorado that was also the, was also-- I want to say his last name was Bloom.

- Jeremy Bloom.

- Jeremy Bloom. You remember him, he was the mogul skier in the Olympics. He had to make a decision. But this is different because he's a professional in one sport. He's making contractual money in one sport. And he's still playing the other amateur sport.

- So he may--

- But he can't accept endorsements.

- But he can't accept endorsement money--

- Like the skier.

- Which is just so silly. It's two separate silos of money that are all going to the same dude.

- But then don't be a college athlete.

- But it's just--

- Don't be an amateur.

- I know, but it's just accounting fundamentals. Like, where does this money come from?

- But I see the slippery slope.

- Sure.

- Right?

- Not really.

- Yeah--

[INTERPOSING VOICES]

- It kind of comes back to the question is should these college athletes be able to make money on endorsements? If they can make their name something, should they be able to make the money on it? Yes. Yeah, I believe they should. Why not?