Jason Whitlock: If LeBron leaves Cleveland he’ll be better known for ‘city-hopping’ than winning

Video Details

Jason McIntyre and Olden Polynice join Colin Cowherd and Jason Whitlock to discuss whether leaving Cleveland would change LeBron's legacy.

- Cowherd, will a move to LA tarnish Lebron's legacy?

- It is his legacy. Moving is his legacy. That's like asking if fast food's going to hurt Burger King's legacy? I mean, when I think of LeBron, I think the player-empowerment superstar. MJ was the first global icon. Magic and Bird saved the league. LeBron--

- Let me flip the script there. Is mobility-- he'll be known more for mobility than winning?

- He'll be--

- Is that a good legacy?

- He'll be known for both. By the way, if he moves to LA and wins-- and he would. Lonzo can play, Ingram can play, Kuzma can play, Randle can play. Winning--

- Durant can play. Steph Curry can play.

- I'm not saying he's beating them.

- [INAUDIBLE] can play.

- But what if he goes there in four years and they get to a final or two?

- Four years? When he's 40 or 52?

- What?

- In four years, he'll be 37, OK?

- How many more years you think he's going to play?

- Five, six.

- Oh, no.

- Brady's going to play three more and he's--

- There's not enough years for LeBron to do anything that's going to affect anything that's happened in the past for the Lakers. It's absolutely not the knife. If he goes to the Clippers, I could see something happening. But you've got Will, Magic, Kareem, Shaq, you've got Kobe with two jerseys retired. There's nothing he can do short of 10 championships.

- But Olden, he doesn't need to get his name among the Laker greats of all time. He's already cemented his legacy, Whitlock.

- Yes, he does.

- He is in the discussion with Michael Jordan. We say it every day. We do it every day on this show. He's passed Kobe. We would agree with that, right? He's passed Magic Johnson. His legacy is cemented.

- It's the narcissism in him.

- What do you mean the narcissism?

- It's the narcissism in him. [LAUGHS]

- What if the narcissism in him wants to be a billionaire, wants to be an owner of a team?

- He's going to do that no matter what.

- He can do that in Cleveland. I feel it would be accelerated in the entertainment capital of the world. We know he's into movies. He was in "Trainwreck."

- There's two teams there. That's what I'm saying. So I could see him going--

- Yeah, but the Clippers brand.

- Clippers? That's--

- Clippers brand has been a roller coaster.

- So what's the point of going to the Lakers when you have pretty much the same type of players in Cleveland now?

- Because the Lakers have a series of young, talented, cheap players. People really are in on Luke Walton. Doc Rivers is a little divided. The way I look at-- listen, we have a history here that if you're great, you can kind of do a Brett Favre last couple years, you can do a Johnny Unitas out in LA.

- No, no. Last couple years? This is his whole career. LeBron James is going to be known for city-hopping. That's his career legacy. I think it actually trumps his legacy as a winner-- is that he just hops from city to city. Cleveland, Miami, Cleveland again, and now probably LA.

- Did we forget Charles Barkley played in Philly and--

- No, no, no, Barkley's not LeBron James at all.

- Did we forget Karl Malone chased a ring with the Lakers at the end?

- That's at the end of his career.

- It's the last year.

- He put 15, 16 years together and you [INAUDIBLE].

- This is a different league than it was in the '80s.

- I get it. No, no, no, I get that it's different. I'm just saying, is that a great legacy?

- OK, it used to be divorce was a stigma. If you say "I'm divorced," nobody cares. A lot of people are divorced.

- Is that a good thing?

- I'm not saying it's a good thing. That's the reality thing. It's the same with mobility. Like, mobility's not a stigma anymore.

- I just feel he should stay in Cleveland. You know, finish out your career in Cleveland, build that legacy, and I think that would enhance his legacy overall.

- What more could he do in Cleveland, Olden? He went back [INAUDIBLE] the city a title.

- Winning another title.

- He said he was going to win one. He didn't.

- No, how bout winning a title with less talent?

- Oh, gees. Are you serious?

- How bout that one? Yes, how bout that one?

- Hey, let's just take away LeBron's great players and see what he can do then? Maybe then he'll-- come on.

- A second title in Cleveland and finishing out-- look, man, Joe Montana was devastated when he had to leave San Francisco. Peyton Manning didn't like leaving Indianapolis. Again, when you're in that all-time-great conversation, I just don't know if this new legacy and new normal that he's establishing, I don't know if it's that great.

- I don't know if it's great either. I think his brand has been established. People are just going to say, second-best player of all time. And I think that's what it is. I don't think he'll ever surpass Jordan.

- Who's going to say that?

- Who isn't saying that?

- You and I. You don't think--

- You don't want to be second best, no matter what.

- Man, you've got Kareem.

- He comes to LA, he's still going to have to live up to Kobe's legacy.

- Well, I just don't think he's leaped over Kareem yet. I don't know if-- I'm not sure if I'm really ready, all the way there over Magic Johnson.

- So what if he stayed in Cleveland and won another title?

- If he won another title in Cleveland, then I think you have a-- he's the second greatest-- it's a stronger argument. But again, I don't know, man. Kareem and Michael, that's a hard.

- So he goes to Philadelphia and wins a title. Then what? Is he on par with Jordan? I mean, we're being a little silly here, are we not?

- No!

- You go to the Lakers in the entertainment captain of the world--

- OK, let me ask you.

- LeBron's global.

- Do you have him above Rudy Gay at this point?

[LAUGHTER]

- Check with me tomorrow.

[LAUGHTER]