Habs fan tries to jinx Quebec arena

In 2008 a Red Sox-rooting construction worker named Gino

Castignoli planted a David Ortiz jersey in the concrete at the new

Yankee Stadium in the hopes that he could curse his favorite team’s

rival with some villainous Boston mojo.

The jersey was later excavated and sold for charity and the

Yankees, apparently uncursed, won the World Series in their first

season in the new ballpark.

You would think that might have been enough to discourage

Éric Rivest, a Canadian construction worker, from attempting a

similar feat at the site of a $400 million arena in Quebec City

— a building many in the area hope will some day welcome the

return of the Quebec Nordiques.

But that didn’t stop Rivest, a Montreal Canadiens fan,

from

href="http://tvasports.ca/hockey/un-mauvais-sort-jete-lamphitheatre-de-quebec-30042013"

target="_blank">tossing a Habs puck into the foundation of the

new 18,000-seat building, which is scheduled to be completed by

September 2015.

Now, I don’t speak French, but according to

href="http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nhl-puck-daddy/montreal-fan-drops-canadiens-puck-foundation-quebec-city-162236527.html"

target="_blank">Yahoo’s Puck Daddy blog, Rivest begins the

22-second video by announcing where he is and stating that he’s

“Gonna put a Habs puck into one of the posts.”

After he drops the puck in, Rivest — who, according to

href="http://quebec.radiox.com/article/rondelle_du_ch_dans_les_fondations_la_revelation"

target="_blank">CHOI 981 Radio X in Quebec, works for

Petrifond, a Montreal-based foundation company — reportedly

offers the following jab: “There you go, Nordiques. We’re keeping

you in mind.”

The Canadiens-Nordiques rivalry began in 1979 and lasted through

the 1994-95 season, the Nordiques’ final year in Quebec before

being relocated to Colorado to become the Avalanche. The teams

played 113 regular-season games (Montreal won the series 74-39),

and played in 31 playoff games, with the Canadiens holding a 17-14

edge in the postseason.

Perhaps the most famous playoff meeting between the two came on

April 20, 1984, a 5-3 series-clinching win for the Canadiens that

was later dubbed the “Good Friday Massacre,” after two

bench-clearing brawls led to the ejections of 10 players.

As recently as this month there have been rumors circulating

that

href="http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blog/Eklund/Quebec-Announcement-Coming-32-Teams/1/50837#.UYArlIJAtvF"

target="_blank">the NHL will return to Quebec. However, right

now, there are no confirmed plans to bring a team back to the

area.