Three Heisman winners, Couch make College Football HOF ballot

The 1998 SEC Player of the Year at Kentucky, Couch set seven NCAA, 14 conference and 26 school records before going on to become the No. 1 pick in the 1999 NFL draft.

The National Football Foundation released the ballot for the College Football Hall of Fame on Thursday, a list of 75 former players and six coaches that includes there Heisman Trophyy winners and FOX Sports South analyst Tim Couch.

The 1998 SEC Player of the Year at Kentucky, Couch set seven NCAA, 14 conference and 26 school records before going on to become the No. 1 pick in the 1999 NFL draft.

Other notables making the list are Heisman winners Eric Crouch (Nebraska) and Rashaan Salaam (Colorado) and Ricky Williams (Texas), along with Brian Bosworth (Oklahoma), Raghib Ismail (Notre Dame), Ray Leiws (Miami), LaDainian Tomlinson (TCU).

"Having a ballot and a voice in the selection of the inductees is one of the most cherished NFF member benefits," said NFF Chairman Archie Manning, a 1989 Hall of Fame inductee from Ole Miss though a statement. "There is no group more knowledgeable or passionate about college football than our membership, and the tradition of the ballot helps us engage them in the lofty responsibility of selecting those who have reached the pinnacle of achievement in our sport."

Ballots were mailed this week to the more than 12,000 NFF members and current HOFers, with the 2014 class announced in May and the formal induction at the new Atlanta facility on Dec. 9.

In order to be eligible for consideration, candidates must make it though one of eight district steering committees, which vote to determine who will appear on the ballot to represent that region. Each year, 15 candidates who are not selected to the HOF will be named automatic holders and bypass that process to appear on the ballot again.

Being enshrined is no small feat considering that 4.99 million have played since Princeton and Rutgers first met on Nov. 6, 1896 and only 934 are in the Hall. That figure represents less than .0002 of one percent of those who have played the game. Another 205 have been inducted as coaches.

"The Hall’s requirement of being a first-team All-American creates a much smaller pool of only 1,500 individuals who are even eligible to be on the ballot," said NFF president & CEO Steven J. Hatchell, "so being in today’s elite group means an individual is truly among the greatest to ever have played the game, and we are proud to announce their names."

Listed below are the FBS coaches and players making up this year’s ballot.

FBS Player Candidates

Trev Alberts, Nebraska-Linebacker: Named unanimous First Team All-American and BIG-8 Defensive Player of the Year in 1993, Recipient of the 1993 Butkus Award and two-time First Team All-Conference pick, 1993 NFF National Scholar-Athlete and Academic All-American.

Eric Bieniemy, Colorado-Running Back: Played in two national championships, leading Buffs to 1990 national title, Unanimous First Team All-American and finished third in 1990 Heisman voting, Two-time All-Big Eight pick, still holding eight CU records.

Dre Bly, North Carolina-Defensive Back: Three-time First Team All-American, twice earning consensus honors, Three-time All-ACC pick who earned Rookie of the Year honors in 1996, Holds school records for career (20) and single-season (11) interceptions.

Tony Boselli, Southern California-Offensive Tackle: Two-time First Team All-American in 1992 and 1994 (consensus-1994), Named top offensive lineman in Pac-10 (1994), 1994 NFF National Scholar-Athlete and Outland Trophy finalist.

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma-Linebacker: Two-time consensus First Team All-America pick (1985-86), Set school record for tackles in a game (22) and named Butkus Award winner in 1985 and ’86, Led Sooners to three consecutive Orange Bowls and ’85 national championship.

Bob Breunig, Arizona State-Linebacker: 1974 First Team All-American and Silver Anniversary Butkus Award winner… Two-time WAC Defensive Player of the Year who led ASU to consecutive WAC Championships and Fiesta Bowl wins… Finished career as school’s all-time leader in both career and single-season tackles.

Jerome Brown, Miami (Fla.)-Defensive Tackle: 1986 Unanimous First Team All-American and finalist for both the Outland and Lombardi trophies as senior, Helped Canes to four consecutive New Year’s Day bowl games, Ranks 10th in school history with 21 career sacks.

Ruben Brown, Pittsburgh-Offensive Tackle: 1994 First Team All-American, Three-time All-Big East performer, earning unanimous first team honors in 1994, Named Washington D.C. Downtown Athletic Club’s National Outstanding Lineman.

Larry Burton, Purdue-Split End: First Team All-American and Outstanding College Athlete of America in 1974 and a First Team All-Big Ten selection, Led the team in receiving in both 1973 and 1974, Named team captain and team MVP in 1974.

Dave Butz, Purdue-Defensive Tackle: 1972 consensus First Team All-American, Finalist for the Lombardi Award in 1972 and named First Team All-Conference, Named Defensive MVP of the Senior Bowl.

Freddie Carr, Texas-El Paso-Linebacker: 1967 First Team All-American who helped UTEP to two Sun Bowl victories, Named 1967 Sun Bowl MVP, Ranks in the top ten in numerous school records, including career tackles (410) and single-season tackles (148).

Mark Carrier, Southern California-Safety: Two-time First Team All-American (1988-89) – unanimous in 1989, 1989 Jim Thorpe Award winner, Two-time First Team All-Conference selection, Led the Pac-10 in interceptions in 1989 with seven.

Wes Chandler, Florida-Split End: 1977 First Team All American, finishing 10th in Heisman Trophy balloting, Two-time First Team All-SEC performer, 1977 team captain who led Gators in receiving three consecutive seasons.

Shane Conlan, Penn State-Linebacker: 1986 consensus First Team All-American and Butkus Award finalist, Led Lions to back-to-back national title appearances, winning championship in 1986, Led team in tackles twice and finished career ranked second in career tackles (274) at PSU.

Tim Couch, Kentucky-Quarterback: 1998 consensus First Team All-American who finished fourth in Heisman voting in 1998 and ninth in 1997, 1998 SEC Player of the Year who led Cats to first win over Alabama in 75 years, Set seven NCAA, 14 SEC, and 26 school records.

Tom Cousineau, Ohio State-Linebacker: Two-time consensus First Team All-American and three-time All-Big Ten performer, Recorded 572 career tackles, ranking second all-time in OSU history, Held nine school records at career’s end, still holding six.

Bob Crable, Notre Dame-Linebacker: Two-time consensus First Team All-American in 1980 and 1981, Set ND records for most career tackles (521), most tackles in a season (187), most tackles in a game (26), Played in 1981 Hula Bowl.

Paul Crane, Alabama-Center/Linebacker: Two-way starter at center/linebacker, earning consensus First Team All-America honors, Member of back-to-back national championship teams, 1965 SEC Lineman of the Year, helping ‘Bama to consecutive SEC championships.

Eric Crouch, Nebraska-Quarterback: 2001 Heisman, Walter Camp, and Davey O’Brien Award winner who led Huskers to 2001 national title game, Holds NCAA record for career rushing TDs by a quarterback (59), Led team to 42-9 record and four bowl berths.

Randall Cunningham, UNLV-Punter: Named First Team All-American as a punter in 1983 and Second Team All-America as a punter and Honorable Mention as a quarterback in 1984, Led UNLV to their first-ever Bowl game, Broke 18 UNLV records.

Troy Davis, Iowa State-Tailback: Two-time consensus First Team All-American and two-time Heisman Trophy finalist, First player in NCAA history to rush for more than 2,000 yards in two seasons, 1996 Big 12 Player of the Year who holds nearly every rushing record at Iowa State.

Eric Dickerson, Southern Methodist-Running Back: Named unanimous First Team All-American and finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1982, Twice named SWC Player of the Year, he holds 14 SMU records including career rushing yards (4,450).

Mike Dirks, Wyoming-Defensive Tackle: 1967 First Team All-American who led Pokes to two bowl berths, Two-time First Team All-WAC selection and member of back-to-back WAC championship teams, Three-year starter who finished career with 210 tackles and 59 tackles for loss.

D.J. Dozier, Penn State-Running Back: Named 1986 consensus First Team All-American and led PSU to perfect 12-0 season and national championship (1986), Finished eighth in 1986 Heisman voting, First PSU back to lead the team in rushing for four consecutive seasons.

Tim Dwight, Iowa-Kick Returner/Wide Receiver: Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1997, First Team All-Big Ten who placed seventh in 1997 Heisman Trophy voting, Finished career as Big Ten’s leader in punt return yardage (1,102).

Jumbo Elliott, Michigan-Offensive Tackle: Two-time First Team All-American (consensus-’87), Two-time All-Big Ten First Team selection and member of 1986 Big Ten Co-Champions, Paved the way for Jamie Morris, who had three-straight 1,000-yard seasons.

William Fuller, North Carolina-Defensive Tackle: Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1983, Holds school record with 57 career TFL and broke Lawrence Taylor’s season record with 22 TFL in 1981, Three-time First Team All-ACC pick.

Thom Gatewood, Notre Dame-Split End: 1970 consensus First Team All-American who finished in the top 12 of Heisman voting, First African-American captain in ND history and led team in receiving for three years and set numerous school records, 1971 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Willie Gault, Tennessee-Wide Receiver: 1982 First Team All-American, Led Vols to three bowl berths, Set six conference and 12 school punt / kickoff return records, Tied NCAA record for most touchdowns by kick return in a single season (3) in 1980.

Kirk Gibson, Michigan State-Wide Receiver: Named First Team All-American, led Big Ten in receiving in league play and helped the Spartans to a Big Ten Co-Championship and a No.12 national ranking in 1978, Played MLB for 17 seasons.

Charlie Gogolak, Princeton-Placekicker: 1965 First Team All-American, Set seven NCAA records and led Princeton to an 8-1 season (1965), Two-time First Team All-Ivy, Holds four school records, Helped popularize the soccer-style technique in the kicking game.

Joe Hamilton, Georgia Tech-Quarterback: 1999 consensus First Team All-American and Davey O’Brien award winner, 1999 Heisman Trophy runner-up and 1999 ACC Player of the Year, Led Tech to three bowl berths and share of 1998 ACC title, Set nine school records.

Al Harris, Arizona State-Defensive End: Named unanimous First Team All-American and Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy finalist in 1978, Named First Team All-Conference, he set an ASU record with 19 sacks in 1978.

Dana Howard, Illinois-Linebacker: Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous honors as a senior, 1994 Butkus Award winner and two-time Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year, School’s all-time leading tackler (595) who led team in tackles each year of career.

Randy Hughes, Oklahoma-Defensive Back: 1974 First Team All-American and member of 1974 national championship team and three Big Eight championship teams, Finished fourth on OU’s career interceptions list (14), 1974 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Bobby Humphrey, Alabama-Running Back: Named First Team All-American in 1987, Led Tide to victories in Aloha Bowl and two Sun Bowls, Named UPI Offensive Player of the Year in 1987, Ended career with 4,958 all-purpose yards and 40 TDs.

Raghib Ismail, Notre Dame-Wide Receiver: Two-time First Team All-American earning consensus honors in 1989 and unanimous laurels in 1990, Walter Camp Player of the Year and Heisman Trophy runner-up in 1990, Led ND to national championship at the Fiesta Bowl and two Orange Bowls.

Roy Jefferson, Utah-Split End: 1964 First Team All-American who led Utes to Liberty Bowl win, Two-time First Team All-WAC performer, leading team to 1964 conference title, Twice led team in receiving and led WAC in receptions (29) and receiving yards (435) in 1963.

Ernie Jennings, Air Force-Wide Receiver: 1970 consensus First Team All-American, finishing eighth in 1970 Heisman Trophy voting, Led Air Force to 1971 Sugar Bowl berth, Holds every single-season and career receiving record at Air Force.

Keyshawn Johnson, Southern California-Wide Receiver: 1995 unanimous First Team All-American who ranked seventh in Heisman voting, 1995 Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year, Earned MVP honors in 1995 Cotton Bowl and 1996 Rose Bowl wins.

Clinton Jones, Michigan State-Halfback: Two-time First Team All-American, earning consensus honors in 1966…Led Spartans to consecutive national championships, Two-time All-Big Ten performer who finished sixth in Heisman Trophy voting in 1966.

Lincoln Kennedy, Washington-Offensive Tackle: 1992 unanimous First Team All-American who led Washington to 1991 national title, Led Huskies to three consecutive Pac-10 titles and three Rose Bowl berths, Twice won Morris Trophy as conference’s best offensive lineman.

Tim Krumrie, Wisconsin-Defensive Tackle: Named a consensus First Team All-American in 1981, Led Badgers to 1981 Garden State Bowl and earned Defensive MVP honors in 1982 Independence Bowl, Three-time First Team All-Conference selection, recording 444 career tackles.

Greg Lewis, Washington-Running Back: 1990 First Team All-American and Doak Walker award winner, Named Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year in 1990, leading Huskies to 1990 conference title, Finished seventh in 1990 Heisman voting and recorded 15, 100-yard games.

Jess Lewis, Oregon State-Defensive Tackle: Named First Team All-American in 1967, Played in the College All-Star Game, East-West Shrine Game and Coaches All-America Bowl in 1970, Two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1967, 1969).

Ray Lewis, Miami (Fla.)-Linebacker: 1995 First Team All-American and Butkus Award runner-up, Led Canes to Fiesta and Orange bowl appearances and ranks sixth all-time at Miami with 388 career tackles, Two-time First Team All-Big East performer who twice led the league in tackles.

Robert Lytle, Michigan-Running Back: Named consensus All-American in 1976, Finished third in the Heisman Trophy voting, Named Big Ten MVP in 1976 and led UM to two conference championships.

Bob McKay, Texas-Offensive Tackle: 1969 consensus First Team All-American who helped Longhorns to national championship and unbeaten season at Cotton Bowl in senior season, Member of two SWC championship teams and 1969 all-conference selection.

Cade McNown, UCLA-Quarterback: 1998 Consensus First Team All-American and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award recipient, 1998 Pac-10 Co-Offensive Player of the Year who led UCLA to consecutive Pac-10 titles in 1997 (shared) and 1998, Holds numerous school records.

Mark Messner, Michigan-Defensive Lineman: 1988 unanimous First Team All-American who was a Lombardi Award finalist, 1988 Big Ten Player of the Year and four-time First Team All-Big Ten selection, Led Wolverines to four bowl berths and named MVP of 1985 Fiesta Bowl.

Darrin Nelson, Stanford-Halfback: 1981 First Team All-American who was the first player in NCAA history to rush for over 1,000 yards and catch more than 50 passes in one season, Finished career as NCAA’s all-time leader in all-purpose yardage (6,885), Four-time All-Pac-10 pick.

Ken Norton Jr., UCLA-Linebacker: 1987 First Team All-American, leading Bruins to four consecutive bowl wins, Member of the 1985 conference championship team, Led team in tackles in 1986 (106) and in 1987 (125) and ranks sixth in school history with 339 career tackles.

Tom Nowatzke, Indiana-Fullback: Named First Team All-American in 1964, A two-time All-Conference selection (1963-64), he led the Big Ten in rushing in 1963, Played in the East/West Shrine Game, Senior Bowl and Coaches All-American Game.

Jim Otis, Ohio State-Fullback: Named consensus First Team All-American in 1969, Member of the 1968 National Championship team, Named First Team All-Big Ten conference in 1969 and led the Buckeyes to two conference titles, Led the team in rushing three times.

Paul Palmer, Temple-Running Back: 1986 unanimous First Team All-American, Led the nation in rushing yards (1,866), rushing yards per game (169.6) and all-purpose yards (2,633) in 1986, Set 23 school records and was named ECAC Player of the Year in 1986.

Antwaan Randle El, Indiana: Quarterback-2001 First Team consensus All-American, First player in FBS history to pass for 6,000 yards and rush for 3,000 yards in career, Rushed for more yards than any QB in FBS history upon conclusion of career.

Simeon Rice, Illinois-Linebacker: Two-time First Team All-American and three-time First Team All-Big Ten selection, Holds conference and school record for career sacks (44.5) and Illini record for career tackles for loss (69), Set school record for single-season sacks (16).

Ron Rivera, California-Linebacker: 1983 consensus First Team All-American, Lombardi Award finalist in 1983 and named East-West Shrine Game Most Valuable Player, Selected as Pac-10 Co-Defensive Player of the Year in 1983, Led team in tackles from 1981-83.

Willie Roaf, Louisiana Tech-Offensive Lineman: 1992 consensus First Team All-American and finalist for Outland Trophy, Led team to 1990 Independence Bowl berth and two-time All-South Independent selection.

Mike Ruth, Boston College-Nose Guard: 1985 consensus First Team All-American and Outland Trophy winner, Three-time All-East and All-ECAC selection, Member of three bowl teams and recorded 344 career tackles, including 29 sacks.

Rashaan Salaam, Colorado-Tailback: 1994 unanimous First Team All-American and Heisman Trophy winner, 1994 Walter Camp Player of the Year and Doak Walker Award recipient, 1994 Big Eight Offensive Player of the Year who led nation in rushing, scoring, and all-purpose yards.

Warren Sapp, Miami (Fla.)-Defensive Tackle: 1994 unanimous First Team All-American who finished sixth in Heisman voting, Recipient of the 1994 Lombardi and Nagurski awards and named Big East Defensive Player of the Year, Led Canes to national title game appearance in 1995.

John Sciarra, UCLA-Quarterback: 1975 First Team All-American who placed seventh in Heisman voting, 1976 Rose Bowl Player of the Game and two-time team MVP, 1975 First Team All-Pac-8 selection and 1975 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Larry Seivers, Tennessee-Wide Receiver: Two-time consensus First Team All-American in 1975 and 1976, Two-time First Team All-SEC selection, Currently ranks sixth in Tennessee history in career reception yardage (1,924) and seventh in career receptions (117).

Sterling Sharpe, South Carolina-Wide Receiver: 1987 First Team All-American, Two-time First Team All-Conference, Set nearly every school receiving record by career’s end, including career receptions (169), single-season receiving yards (1,106) and career receiving yards (2,497).

Art Still, Kentucky-Defensive End: 1977 unanimous First Team All-American, Two-time First Team All-SEC performer who led Cats to 1976 SEC Championship, 1977 SEC Defensive Player of the Year who set school record for 22 TFL in 1977 (still standing).

Derrick Thomas, Alabama-Linebacker: 1988 unanimous First Team All-American and Butkus award winner, Led Tide to four consecutive bowl berths, earning 1988 SEC Defensive Player of the Year, Set NCAA career sack record (52) and finished career with 74 TFL.

Zach Thomas, Texas Tech-Linebacker: Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous honors in 1995, Two-time Consensus SWC Defensive Player of the Year (1993, 94) who led Red Raiders to 1994 SWC title, Ranks fifth all-time at Tech with 390 career tackles.

LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU-Tailback: 2000 Unanimous First Team All-American and 2000 Doak Walker Award winner, 1999 WAC Offensive Player of the Year who led TCU to consecutive co-shares of WAC title, Holds 15 school records and is TCU’s all-time leading rusher.

Jackie Walker, Tennessee-Linebacker: 1970 and ’71 First Team All-American, Set NCAA record for career interceptions returned for TD by a linebacker (5), Two-time First Team All-SEC selection who helped Vols to 1969 SEC Championship.

Wesley Walls, Mississippi-Tight End: 1988 First Team All-American and First Team All-SEC selection, Played as a two-way player his senior season (DE-TE), Tallied 36 receptions for 426 yards and three touchdowns in one season at tight end, 1988 NFF National Scholar-Athlete.

Lorenzo White, Michigan State-Running Back: Two-time First Team All-American, earning unanimous (’85) and consensus (’87) honors, Led State to 1987 Big Ten title and Rose Bowl win, Led nation in rushing (1985), first MSU player to lead team in rushing four-straight seasons.

Clarence Williams, Washington State: Running Back-Named First Team All-American and All-Conference in 1964, Twice led the Cougars in rushing, scoring and kickoff returns, Played in the Hula Bowl, East-West Shrine and All-West Coast All-Star Games in 1964.

Ricky Williams, Texas-Running Back: Two-time unanimous First Team All-American and 1998 Heisman Trophy winner, Finished career as NCAA’s all-time leading rusher and won back-to-back NCAA rushing titles, 1998 Big 12 Offensive Player of the Year who left Texas with 46 school records.

Steve Wisniewski, Penn State-Offensive Guard: 1988 First Team All-American, Member of 1986 12-0 national championship team, Helped Blair Thomas rush for 1,414 yards and 11 touchdowns in 1987 and D.J. Dozier attain First Team All-America honors in 1986.

FBS Coach Candidates

Mike Bellotti-Chico State (Calif.) (1984-88), Oregon (1995-2008): Winningest coach in Oregon football history, leading the Ducks to their first four ten-win seasons in school annals, Led Oregon to two Pac-10 titles and 12 bowl games, Led Ducks to 11-1 record and Fiesta Bowl win in 2001,with a final ranking at No. 2.

Jim Carlen-West Virginia (1966-69), Texas Tech (1970-74), South Carolina (1975-1981): Led teams to eight bowl games and 13 winning seasons in 16 years as head coach, 1973 National Coach of the Year, Three-time Southwest Conference Coach of the Year, Coached Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers at South Carolina.

Pete Cawthon Sr.-Texas Tech (1930-40): Led Tech to four Border Conference titles in 11 seasons at the helm, Led 1938 team to 10-0 regular season and the school’s first-ever Cotton Bowl appearance, Boasts highest win percentage (69.3) among Tech coaches with terms of three years or more.

Danny Ford-Clemson (1978-1989), Arkansas (1993-97): Led Tigers to perfect 12-0 season and national title in 1981, Won five ACC championships and twice named conference coach of the year, Boasts four of the top five winningest seasons in school history and set Clemson record with 41 consecutive weeks in AP Top 20, Led Arkansas to first SEC West title in 1995.

Billy Jack Murphy-Memphis (1958-71): All-time winningest coach in Memphis history, Had 11 winning seasons and retired as the 15th winningest coach in the nation, Member of the Memphis Hall of Fame and Mississippi State Hall of Fame.

Darryl Rogers-Cal State-Hayward (1965), Fresno State (1966-72), San Jose State (1973-75), Michigan State (1976-79), Arizona State (1980-84): Took Fresno State to two bowl games. Achieved an unprecedented national ranking at San Jose State, Was Big Ten Coach of the Year in 1977 and National Coach of the Year by Sporting News in 1978, Won the Big Ten title in 1978.