StaTuesday: Wrigley Field has been friendly confines for Brewers’ Braun

Ryan Braun went 0 for 3 in the Milwaukee Brewers’ win at Wrigley Field on Monday. Such performances are rare over Braun’s career.

Of all the stadiums in the National League’s Central Division, Braun has his best numbers at Wrigley — and that includes Miller Park.

PARK HR AVG OBP SLG OPS
Wrigley Field 17 .332 .384 .565 .950
Miller Park 157 .298 .370 .540 .910
Great American Ball Park 26 .287 .355 .551 .906
PNC Park 14 .278 .355 .492 .847
Busch Stadium 9 .275 .308 .400 .708

There’s only a handful of parks he’s had better statistics, but in all of those he’s played in 34 or fewer games. Braun has played in 80 games at the Cubs’ home field.

He hasn’t had his best year in Chicago’s North side in 2018 — although he does have two home runs and a .522 slugging percentage — which continues a strange trend the past few seasons of alternating good and, well, not-as-good years (it’s hard to describe a .593 slugging percentage and .843 OPS as bad).

YEAR PA AVG OBP SLG OPS
2007 28 .385 .429 .615 1.044
2008 43 .325 .372 .500 .872
2009 35 .313 .371 .375 .746
2010 31 .571 .613 .786 1.399
2011 31 .233 .258 .400 .658
2012 33 .448 .485 .828 1.312
2013 10 .625 .700 .875 1.575
2014 27 .160 .222 .200 .422
2015 22 .333 .364 .619 .983
2016 28 .222 .250 .593 .843
2017 29 .333 .448 .750 1.198
2018 24 .217 .250 .522 .772

Add it all up, and Braun has been one of the most prolific hitters in major-league history at Wrigley Field (which has been the Cubs’ home since 1916).

Among players with at least 340 plate appearances at the park, Braun has the 18th-best OPS, with several Hall of Famers (and potential Hall of Famers) ahead of him.

(And, yes, we know on the surface .384 + .565 does not equal .950, but baseball-reference.com, where we got the numbers, apparently calculates beyond the first three decimal points even though that’s all it displays.)

PLAYER PA AVG OBP SLG OPS
Willie Mays 787 .342 .413 .664 1.077
Mike Schmidt 611 .307 .396 .653 1.048
Rogers Hornsby* 1,234 .352 .440 .591 1.031
Hack Wilson* 1,999 .329 .424 .600 1.024
Albert Pujols 395 .296 .397 .607 1.005
Joey Votto 399 .318 .429 .573 1.001
Hank Aaron 782 .337 .376 .612 .988
Monte Irvin 359 .334 .403 .576 .980
Mel Ott 814 .325 .407 .567 .974
Joe Torre 487 .358 .422 .552 .974
Dave Kingman* 940 .297 .360 .608 .968
Al Oliver 428 .354 .397 .563 .960
Sammy Sosa* 3,948 .289 .365 .595 .960
Tony Perez 466 .335 .381 .577 .958
Frank Robinson 440 .310 .397 .561 .958
Bobby Bonilla 373 .306 .383 .573 .956
Barry Bonds 490 .272 .390 .564 .954
Ryan Braun 341 .332 .384 .565 .950
Willie Stargell 535 .304 .380 .570 .950
Luis Gonzalez 708 .314 .400 .548 .949

* — Played portion of career with Cubs

Dave Heller is the author of Ken Williams: A Slugger in Ruth’s Shadow (a Larry Ritter Book Award nominee), Facing Ted Williams – Players From the Golden Age of Baseball Recall the Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived and As Good As It Got: The 1944 St. Louis Browns