Colin Cowherd explains why Houston’s Chris Paul is the most unlucky player in NBA history

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Once again, history repeated itself this year with Chris Paul failing to remain healthy in the NBA Playoffs after he was sidelined prior to Game 7 with a hamstring injury he sustained in Game 6. Noting the dynamic difference CP3 would've have made on the court in the Rockets' Game-7 loss to Curry and KD's Golden State Warriors, Colin Cowherd explains why Chris Paul is the most unlucky player in NBA history.

COLIN COWHERD: Best for Last.

- After almost three hours, Colin apparently hasn't gotten to the point yet. Quit holding out on us Cowherd, it's the Best for Last.

COLIN COWHERD: OK. Warriors Rockets to me was defined by the one player who wasn't available in the last two games, Chris Paul. He had led the Rockets to a win, and at the end of game five got hurt, hamstring, they're up 3-2. I'm going to tell you why Chris Paul is the unluckiest player. Look at his career in the NBA.

So let's start with his rookie year. He's the fourth overall pick to the New Orleans Hornets. That year, a natural disaster, Hurricane Katrina, hits New Orleans. They have to play home games in another state, several states away, Oklahoma City. But Chris Paul is the bright spot, wins rookie of the year, gets every vote but one. And in 2008, he leads that team to its first ever playoff series victory.

Great news, he's traded to the Lakers. That is good news for anybody. Who is going to the Lakers. And they got Kobe Bryant, they got Pau Gasol, they are healthy, the Lakers had won two of the last three titles, I'm going to be part of a dynasty. Oh, I beg your jargon. Commissioner David Stern, not. Not allowing it to happen. At the time, the NBA owned the Hornets. Stern allows Paul to be traded to LA, but it's the Clippers.

Oh wait, David Stern, slumlord, racist, owned the Clippers. They were absolutely the most dysfunctional team, even more than the Cleveland Browns at the moment. He's paired with two stars, neither can shoot as the league is becoming a shooters league, DeAndre Jordan, Blake Griffin. But Chris Paul changes the franchise. Leads them, threatened to not play if Sterling owned the team, to remove him from ownership. Then leads the team to the playoffs every single year.

But let's look at the low lights of those playoff seasons. 2015 first round, injures his hamstring in game seven against the defending champion Spurs, but still hits the series winning shot. They move on. 2015 second round, misses the first two games, Clippers go up 3-1 versus Houston, still lose even though Paul averages 26 and 10. Let's go to 2016. First round, up 2-1 versus Portland. Chris Paul breaks his hand in game four. Blake Griffin hurt, same day, lose the series.

Last year, first round, up 2-1. Blake Griffin, season ending injury. Lose the series, even though Chris Paul goes 25 and 10. It finally seems like bad luck is behind Chris Paul. He is traded to the Rockets. He adds 10 wins. He elevates James Harden to the MVP. They are up 3-2 on the defending champions. But here's how the season ends, a hamstring injury. And without Chris Paul on the floor, the Warriors win the next two games.

Forced to sit on the bench and watch his team frustratingly lose game six and game seven. Chris Paul did not make third team all NBA. He watches his three point shooting bonanza, the Rockets, put on the worst display of three point shooting in NBA history without him. The NBA is about to award MVP to one of his teammates James Harden. Chris Paul, as Kevin Durant once said to his mother, "Chris Paul, you, my friend, are the real MVP." The unluckiest player in NBA history.

From a natural disaster, to playing in another state, to having a Laker trade next, to going to essentially the Cleveland Browns of the NBA, being saddled with two guys who can't shoot, goes to Houston. All through his career, injury, injury, playoffs, injury, some his, some Blake. Unluckiest guy in the NBA.