Fight Blog Recap: Ronda Rousey taps Cat Zingano in 14 seconds

It was hard to imagine Ronda Rousey topping her last fight, in which she knocked out Alexis Davis in 16 seconds, but she did it by submitting Cat Zingano in just 14 seconds to cap UFC 184 in Los Angeles.

Zingano came charging out of the gate looking for a quick knee to put Rousey off balance, but instead found herself on the ground with an Olympic Judo bronze medalist fishing for a limb to grab.

Rousey transitioned in an instant and put Zingano’s arm behind her back and a split-second later the fight was over.

The win moves Rousey to 11-0 with 10 first-round finishes and nine of them by way of armbar. There don’t appear to be many challenges left for Rousey in the division, as she proves once again she’s the most dominant women’s fighter in the world at 135 pounds.

In the co-main event, Holly Holm earned a split decision over Raquel Pennington in a closely contested matchup also at 135 pounds. Holm was very active with her strikes, but just wasn’t able to connect with anything flush to put Pennington in trouble over the course of three rounds.

In the end, Holm’s output still did enough to get her the win.

Here are the full results and play-by-play from UFC 184: Rousey vs. Zingano.

MAIN EVENT: Ronda Rousey vs. Cat Zingano

Round 1:

Zingano comes out looking for a kick and ends up on the ground with Rousey, who transitions to an armbar and it takes about two seconds and Zingano taps out! Wow, that was lightning quick.

Official result: Ronda Rousey def. Cat Zingano by submission (armbar) at 14 seconds, R1

Analysis:

Rousey just makes it look easy. She knocks out Alexis Davis in 16 seconds and then submits Zingano in 14 seconds. Just an incredible performance once again from Rousey. At this point there aren’t many challenges left for her so the women’s division is going to need to find someone worthy to challenge Rousey. Right now the most likely contenders are Jessica Eye or Bethe Correia, although the UFC should do everything possible to get Cris "Cyborg" Justino in the Octagon because that is the biggest possible fight for Rousey. 

Holly Holm vs. Raquel Pennington

Round 1:

Pennington shoots in for a takedown, but Holm defends well. Holm starting to get more comfortable on the feet, throwing a side kick followed by hard, straight punches. Pennington looking for the clinch to stay away from Holm’s power from the outside. Holm is keeping Pennington at the end of her punches, but not connecting with any power. Another side kick to end the round

10-9 Holly Holm 

Round 2:

Holm throwing a ton of combinations but still not landing much. Luckily for Holm, Pennington isn’t doing much in the way of offense at all this round.  Holm with a nice left to the body. Holm shrugs off a takedown and throws a knee to the body as they separate. Pennington’s best weapon so far has been a leg kick to the thigh but she’s not countering when Holm jumps in and throws punches in bunches. 

10-9 Holly Holm

Round 3:

Holm opens with a right hook that rattles Pennington’s jaw to start round three. Pennington jumps in and finally connects with a straight right that snaps Holm’s head back. Holm jumping in and trying to land something big, but just coming away empty. Pennington clips Holm and she drops, but it was hard to tell how much of it was the punch or a slip because she’s back up immediately. Holm has found a home for her right hand late and Pennington’s eye has taken the brunt of the damage as it starts to swell shut.

10-9 Raquel Pennington

FOX Sports scores the fight 29-28 for Holly Holm

Official result: Holly Holm def. Raquel Pennington by split decision (30-27, 29-28, 28-29)

Analysis:

Holm gets the win her UFC debut and that’s what is most important as she starts out career in the Octagon, but it definitely wasn’t easy. Holm didn’t look bad on her feet, but she just couldn’t find a home for her punches or kicks for most of the fight. Holm still has a lot of room to grow before she’s really ready for the top fighters in the division. This fight proves what a lot of people already suspected: Holm is a great prospect but it’s going to take some time before she’s ready to challenge fighters in the top five, much less someone like Ronda Rousey. 

Josh Koscheck vs. Jake Ellenberger

Round 1:

Ellenberger with a good stiff jab early but Koscheck counters with a blast double leg takedown. Koscheck pressing the action against the cage while throwing a few foot stomps at Ellenberger as well. Back in the center, Ellenberger pops Koscheck with a hard right hook. Koscheck tries for another takedown, but doesn’t commit this time and Ellenberger is countering with hard punches. 

10-9 Jake Ellenberger

Round 2:

Koscheck immediately shoots in looking for the takedown, Ellenberger defends well. After a stall against the cage wall, the referee restarts them in the center. Ellenberger showing a ton of confidence in his hands as Koscheck backs up. Koscheck tags him with a good left but he’s having some serious issues with his left eye. Continuously wiping it whenever he takes a step away from Ellenberger. Koscheck with another takedown attempt and gets trapped against the cage. Ellenberger grabs a guillotine choke and Koscheck knows he’s in trouble. He drops and tries to roll out but Ellenberger isn’t letting go. Koscheck can’t get out and taps. Crazy finishing sequence.

Official result: Jake Ellenberger def. Josh Koscheck by submission (north-south choke) at 4:20, R2

Analysis:

Koscheck started strong with one of his signature takedowns, but as soon as Ellenberger got comfortable on his feet and kept the former "Ultimate Fighter" competitor from getting him to the ground, the fight shifted dramatically.  Once Ellenberger got the choke locked up, Koscheck was done. It was a much-needed win for Ellenberger after three straight losses and a really bizarre performance in his previous bout. Ellenberger remains a very dangerous foe for anybody at 170 pounds when he’s on his game. As for Koscheck, that marks four straight defeats but with one more fight on his contract, maybe the UFC gives him a final fight in the Octagon. It seems like if anyone deserves it, Koscheck is the one. 

Alan Jouban vs. Richard Walsh

Round 1:

Walsh with a good kick to the body and Jouban counters with one of his own. Walsh aggressively stepping forward. Jouban comes through with a big elbow strike standing and Walsh is rocked. Jouban fires off another shot and Walsh wobbles and the referee swoops in and stops the fight before he can take any more damage. 

Official result: Alan Jouban def. Richard Walsh by knockout (strikes) at 2:19, R1

Analysis:

Coming off a very controversial decision loss in his last fight, Alan Jouban had no plans of allowing this one to go to the judges. Jouban was patient on his feet and the technique with which he separated from the clinch and landed the elbow strike was just beautiful. Jouban is a really fun addition to the welterweight division and he’s probably got a lot of performance bonuses left in his UFC career. After the fight, Jouban asked to fight on the upcoming UFC Fight Night card in New Orleans. 

Tony Ferguson vs. Gleison Tibau

Round 1:

Tibau counters Ferguson with a good left-right combo about a minute into the round. Ferguson pumping his jab and grabs a leg and puts Tibau down for just a moment. Ferguson clocks Tibau with a quick right hand and Tibau is hurt! Ferguson is all over him trying to get a choke. Ferguson rolls to take his back and wraps up a rear naked choke. Tibau taps!

Official result: Tony Ferguson def. Gleison Tibau by submission (rear naked choke) at 2:37, R1

Analysis:

Ferguson has just looked better and better his past few fights. He was virtually flawless on Saturday as he beat Tibau standing before finishing him on the ground. Ferguson’s confidence is only going to grow from this win and it’s time for him to get another step up in competition. He deserves a top-10 opponent to see exactly where he stands in this division. 

Mark Munoz vs. Roan Carneiro

Round 1:

Munoz going for the takedown but Carneiro sprawls and ends up in side control. Carneiro transitions to the back in a hurry and he locks in a rear naked choke.  Munoz doesn’t tap but he goes to sleep. Wow, what a very impressive performance from Carneiro.

Official result: Roan Carneiro def. Mark Munoz by submission (rear naked choke) at 1:40, R1

Analysis:

It’s been more than six years since Carneiro was in the UFC, but he stormed back at UFC 184 just dominating Munoz on the ground before wrapping up the rear naked choke finish. Carneiro is naturally a welterweight, but he certainly looked big enough to fight at 185 pounds so it seems he’ll have some options for his next fight. As for Munoz, he drops his third fight in a row and fourth out of his past five. It’s time for some tough decision-making for Munoz’s future because he’s not getting any younger and the losses are really starting to add up. 

Roman Salazar vs. Norifumi "Kid" Yamamoto

Round 1:

Yamamoto light on his feet as he tries to make a beat on Salazar’s movement. Salazar just a step behind so far. Salazar catches Yamamoto with an eye poke and the fight is paused for a moment. Both fighters are throwing a lot of strikes, but neither are landing much at all through round one. Hard round to score.

10-9 Kid Yamamoto

Round 2:

Another eye poke this time it’s Salazar who gets caught. Fight resumes.  Yamamoto putting together some good, fast combinations. Salazar fires back with one of his own but he gets caught with another eye poke that pauses the fight again. Salazar still can’t see out of his left eye and the doctor takes another look and that’s it. 

"I won’t be able to see," Salazar told referee "Big" John McCarthy.

Unfortunate ending but seems like the only way things could end.

Official result: Roman Salazar and Norifumi "Kid" Yamamoto declared no contest (eye injury), 2:37, R2

Analysis:

Eye pokes are always an unfortunate part of MMA and it happened three times in less than two rounds during this bout. UFC president Dana White has long talked about making a change in the gloves to possibly curve the fingers to help avoid eye pokes. The reality is eye pokes probably will continue to happen regardless, but it’s the referee’s decision to penalize a fighter for doing it. It seems like that’s the most logical plan of action to stop fighters from pawing forward with open fingers when facing an opponent, which is usually when eye pokes tend to happen. 

Dhiego Lima vs. Tim Means

Round 1:

Means is walking Lima down as they exchange strikes to start the fight.  Means cracks Lima with a big series of punches before a huge knee puts him on the mat! Lima finds a way to survive, but Means is just punishing him with punches. Lima gets dropped again and Means just pours it on and referee Herb Dean steps in to stop the fight. Just total domination.

Official result: Tim Means def. Dhiego Lima by TKO (strkes) at 2:17, R1

Analysis:

Since coming back to the UFC and moving up to welterweight, Means has looked like a completely different fighter. He lost a close decision to Neil Magny in his first fight back, but since then he’s won three fights in a row and now gets his first TKO finish since returning. Means is just nasty with his striking style and he’s going to be a tough matchup for anyone willing to stand with him at 170 pounds. 

Derrick Lewis vs. Ruan Potts

Round 1:

Potts kicking early as Lewis just stands in front of him as he walks him down across the Octagon. Lewis looks for a takedown and gets locked in the clinch before he hits Potts with a low shot that pauses the fight for a moment. The fighters hit the mat on a scramble and Potts is looking for a knee bar and he nearly gets it. Lewis rolls until he finally breaks free. Potts lands another takedown and gets on top of Lewis. Potts loses his position and Lewis rolls and he’s blasting away with big, heavy shots as the round ends.

10-9 Derrick Lewis

Round 2:

Potts trying desperately to get this one to the mat and Lewis is just staying on top, hammering away with shots. Lewis gets down into Potts’ guard and both fighters look winded. Lewis finally passes the guard and Potts is just eating punches. Lewis moves to mount and he’s just punching at Potts, who can’t do anything but cover his head. Lewis continues the barrage until the referee finally stops it.

Official result: Derrick Lewis def. Ruan Potts by TKO (strikes) at 3:18, R2

Analysis:

Lewis was a heavy favorite going into the fight, but give credit to Potts for sticking around early and nearly grabbing a submission in the first round.  Lewis came back strong in round two and absolutely mauled Potts on the ground. Lewis remains a fun prospect to watch in the UFC’s heavyweight division while Potts drops to 0-3 in the UFC and likely will find himself on the outside looking in when Joe Silva hands out pink slips following this card. 

James Krause vs. Valmir Lazaro

Round 1:

Both fighters enjoying the striking game throughout the first round, Lazaro with a few good power punches that tag Krause, but he keeps coming forward. Lazaro putting together some good combinations, going first to the body and then to the head. Krause has a little bit of a mouse and cut developing under his right eye.

10-9 Valmir Lazaro

Round 2:

Krause is looking for the takedown, but Lazaro is shrugging him off without much effort. Lazaro still controlling the range and putting together the more effective combinations. Lazaro doing great with a double jab just popping Krause repeatedly.

10-9 Valmir Lazaro

Round 3:

Lazaro is chopping away at Krause with his strikes to the legs, head and body. Krause’s face is looking very beat up at this point in the fight. Lazaro just pinpoint accurate with his strikes. Krause coming back late as he pressure Lazaro every which way across the Octagon. He finally lands some good, solid punches that snap Lazaro’s head back. Krause pouring it on as the fight comes to an end.

10-9 James Krause

FOX Sports scores it 29-28 for Valmir Lazaro

Official result: Valmir Lazaro def. James Krause by split decision (29-28, 29-28, 28-29)

Analysis:

Close fight at points but Lazaro landed the more damaging strikes, which probably earned him the victory in the end. Lazaro did a good job with his accuracy as he countered Krause throughout. Krause came back late but it was too late to get him the win. Krause drops to 1-3 in his past four fights in the UFC. 

Masio Fullen vs. Alex Torres

Round 1:

Torres gets tagged early but comes back and nails Fullen with a straight right that hurts him. Torres just going wild with punches and Fullen counters with a good right hand of his own. Torres clips him again with a short right hand and Fullen is stumbling again. Fullen is able to get a takedown with just about a minute to go in the round and works to pass guard. The fighters are up again and Torres tags Fullen again with a series of straight punches as the round comes to an end.

10-9 Alex Torres

Round 2:

Fullen having a much better round this time out as he stalks Torres across the cage and staying technical with his striking. Fullen pops Torres with a few good punches that stagger the Colombian. Torres looks like all that activity in the first round has zapped his conditioning. Fullen closes with a flurry of punches as the round ends.

10-9 Masio Fullen

Round 3:

Fullen blasts Torres with a hard right and follows it up with a quick left that hurts him. Fullen comes in with a jumping knee directly to Torres’ midsection. Fullen counters Torres as he charges in with another hard punch. Torres trying to get a takedown and finally puts Fullen down, but they only hit the ground for a matter of seconds.

10-9 Masio Fullen

FOX Sports scores the fight 29-28 Masio Fullen

Official result: Masio Fullen def. Alex Torres by split decision (29-28, 29-28, 28-29)

Analysis:

Strong comeback from Fullen after getting staggered twice early from Torres. Good job weathering an early storm and then putting on a much more technical performance in rounds two and three. Both guys seem a long way from competing in the thick of the UFC’s featherweight division, but a good win nonetheless for Fullen.