The Latest: Feds eye move to regulate legal sports betting

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              FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018, file photo, gamblers place bets in the temporary sports betting area at the SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia. The federal government would regulate sports betting nationwide under a bill to be introduced Wednesday, Jan. 19,2018. The bill would have the U.S. Justice Department set minimum standards states must meet in order to offer sports betting, but denies the sports leagues the so-called “integrity fees” they have been seeking in new legislation, essentially a cut of sport betting revenue. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
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ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The Latest on a bill that would have the federal government regulate sports betting nationwide (all times local):

2:20 p.m.

A bill that would have the federal government regulate sports betting nationwide has been introduced in the U.S. Senate.

Sen. Charles Schumer, a New York Democrat, and Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah introduce the Sports Wagering Market Integrity Act of 2018 on Wednesday afternoon.

It would have the U.S. Justice Department set minimum standards states must meet in order to offer sports betting.

The eight states that already offer sports betting could still offer it while the Justice Department evaluates their laws.

The bill would not provide so-called “integrity fee” payments to the leagues, but would require that sports wagering operators use data provided or licensed by the leagues.

New Jersey won a U.S. Supreme Court case in May clearing the way for all 50 states to offer legal sports betting.

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12:10 p.m.

The federal government would regulate sports betting nationwide under a bill to be introduced Wednesday.

Sen. Charles Schumer, a New York Democrat, tells The Associated Press he and Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah will introduce the Sports Wagering Market Integrity Act of 2018.

It would have the U.S. Justice Department set minimum standards states must meet in order to offer sports betting.

The eight states that already offer sports betting could still offer it while the Justice Department evaluates their laws.

The bill would not provide so-called “integrity fee” payments to the leagues, but would require that sports wagering operators use data provided or licensed by the leagues.

New Jersey won a U.S. Supreme Court case in May clearing the way for all 50 states to offer legal sports betting.