Should the Arizona Cardinals pursue A.J. McCarron?

The backup quarterback of the Cincinnati Bengals may be on the trading block and the Arizona Cardinals could show interest

The subject is starting to get old, but the Arizona Cardinals still need to find Carson Palmer’s replacement. Even if they do acquire a quarterback they believe can be the future this offseason, it looks as if Palmer will once again be the starter in 2017.

But there’s an intriguing name being talked about who could possibly lead the Cards into the future.

A.J.McCarron is currently the backup quarterback of the Cincinnati Bengals. Andy Dalton’s starting job appears to be safe despite his 0-4 record in the postseason. So McCarron, who’s contract will expire at the conclusion of 2017, could possibly be put on the trade block.

The 26-year old’s professional claim to fame took place during the 2015 season. After Dalton fractured the thumb on his throwing hand, McCarron took the reigns. He managed to win one out of his two starts at the end of the regular season before leading the club into the playoffs.

He played well in the postseason game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, completing 23 of 41 passes for 212 yards, with one touchdown and one interception. But the Bengals did end up losing the game, 18-16. Even so, McCarron had proven himself worthy of being an NFL starter.

Would McCarron be a good fit in Bruce Arians’ offense? He’s loaded with intangibles, a born leader who starred at the University of Alabama. Although he has decent size (6’3, 220), his arm strength has been questioned.

There’s also a question of compensation. How much would it take to acquire the signal-caller? If the Cardinals would be unwilling to part with a first-round draft pick, could a second or third-round pick get a deal done?

McCarron should have a decent amount of suitors. That means Arizona could possibly have to get into a bidding war to acquire his services. What the Cards would offer for him would ultimately show their level of interest, if they have any interest at all.

This article originally appeared on