PATRIOTS GAME DAY PREVIEW;PATRIOTS NOTEBOOK;Not taken Light-ly;O-line preps for Ravens’ ferocious

FOXBORO – Left tackle Matt Light took roughly one second to

remember the play. He recalled Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs

whipping around him and making a game-changing sack, causing a

fumble and leading to a score early in the blowout playoff loss to

Baltimore last year.

”Oh, that was all me,” Light said. ”I get awarded that one.”

Not even a year later, Light and the

Patriots offensive line will face

the same, pressure-happy Baltimore defense today at 1 p.m. at

Gillette Stadium. The key will be to learn from its mistakes

against a unit ranked No. 3 in the NFL, one that features Suggs off

the edge. ”Of course, you can always learn from it,” Light said.

”You don’t set right, you don’t take care of business, that’s

usually what happens. You just got to hold up when they dial it in.

You got to hold up on the edge by yourself when they ask you to do

it. Technique and setting right and getting your hands on them (is

big). Not getting outworked.”

To complicate matters, nose tackle Haloti Ngata is a presence in

the middle. The 350-pounder has made life difficult for foes,

particularly on run plays.

”I don’t want to say anybody is invincible or has never gotten

beat, but (Ngata) definitely wins more than he loses,” running

back Sammy Morris said. ”Even if it’s a stalemate or a tie (for

the offense), it almost counts as a win. But misdirection (can)

keep him off-balance to where he can’t just fire off and maul a

guy.”

Not so fast

For those who opine that the

Patriots offense immediately will

improve without receiver Randy Moss, Tom Brady delivered a quick

message: Slow down.

”I don’t think we sit here and lose a Hall of Fame player and

we’re better all of the sudden,” the quarterback said during an

interview with NFL Network that will air this morning. ”I don’t

think that’s the way it is. How the offense will evolve and change,

that remains to be seen. Other guys will have other opportunities.

But you don’t lose Randy and say, `We’re better.’ That’d be foolish

to think that.”

Branching out?

During his first stint in New England, receiver Deion Branch

became known for his dance-happy touchdown celebrations. He had

plenty of practice with 14 of them.

Yet, in his return to the

Patriots last week, Branch isn’t

quite sure how he’ll handle it if he scores.

”I’m not sure, because I normally would take all the stuff from

the offensive linemen,” Branch said. ”We mainly get together

(yesterday), and they’ll discuss that. The linemen just say, `We

want to see this or see that.’ ”

Added Brady: ”Deion can dance, now.”

Two good

The Ravens boast two distinct running threats in the shifty Ray

Rice and the hard-charging Willis McGahee. Rice has averaged 4.2

yards per carry, and McGahee has scored three touchdowns.

The

Patriots front seven must recognize

who is in the game.

”You can get anything out of Ray Rice – downhill, cut-back,

bounce out,” end Gerard Warren said. ”McGahee is a little more

downhill. But both of them are explosive. If there is a hole

available, they’ll get into the secondary.”

Warren said they both excel at reading the blocks of their

offensive linemen, ”but more importantly, they’re just hard

runners.”

Super saver

Branch had an omen earlier in the year when he realized he still

had his game plan from the Super Bowl win against the Eagles, one

that ended with him receiving MVP honors.

Turns out, he’s not alone.

”Unfortunately, I have pretty much everything,” coach Bill

Belichick said. ”I’ve saved pretty much all the stuff I have

through the years, so it’s quite a bit of junk. But definitely,

those games like that, it kind of goes in a place where it’s not

buried as deep as some of the other stuff I have is. But that

doesn’t surprise me.”