Missed field goals doom Stanford in Luck’s finale

Freshman kicker Jordan Williamson sobbed as he sat in front of

his locker moments after his missed 35-yard field goal at the end

of regulation cost No. 4 Stanford a Fiesta Bowl victory over

Oklahoma State.

Williamson also missed a 43-yarder in overtime. In all, he

hooked three field goal attempts to the left in the Cardinal’s

41-38 loss to the third-ranked Cowboys on Monday night.

The youngster from Austin, Texas, had missed just three field

goals in 15 tries all season, only one from inside 40 yards.

Williamson shook his head ”no” when a couple of reporters

approached his locker.

He knew he could have made sure Andrew Luck’s phenomenal college

career ended with a victory, but the Cardinal quarterback –

probably soon to become the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft – said no

one was to blame for the loss.

”Put yourself in that situation,” Luck said. ”Yeah, it’s

tough. It’s very tough. I know guys will rally around him. He’s got

a very bright future in front of him. The media tends to want a

scapegoat or a hero, and that’s just not the case in any football

game.”

Luck’s final game was a masterpiece in many ways. He completed

27 of 31 passes for 347 yards and two touchdowns with one

interception. He threw for more yards only twice, at Arizona in

2009 (423) and against Colorado this year (370).

”Typical, typical,” Stanford coach David Shaw said. ”He makes

five plays that turn bad plays into great plays.”

Luck, however, was a lot more self-critical.

”I play to win football games,” he said. ”Yeah, it’s great to

have good stats, efficiency, whatever. But at the end of the day

it’s about winning. That’s why I love football. It’s not about one

person. Win or lose, no one ever gets all the credit or all the

blame.”

Luck leaves Stanford as the school’s career leader in total

offense, touchdown passes, passing efficiency and completion

percentage. He surprised pretty much everyone a year ago when he

decided to return to college for his junior year of eligibility. He

didn’t get his team to the national title game. But after an 11-2

season, he expressed no regrets.

”Yes, it was worth it,” Luck said. ”Not to say I enjoyed

every moment, because I didn’t. But I would never regret it. I felt

I grew a lot as a person, as a player.”

Stanford outgained Oklahoma State 590-412 and had 27 first downs

to 15 for the Cowboys. The Cardinal dominated time of possession

41:47 to 18:13. But big plays by OSU star receiver Justin Blackmon

kept the teams close.

Oklahoma State (12-1) failed to score in the first quarter for

the only time all season. Luck, meanwhile, threw a 53-yard

touchdown pass to wide-open Ty Montgomery, then Jeremy Stewart ran

24 yards for a score to make it 14-0.

Brandon Weeden, though, connected with Blackmon on scoring plays

of 43 and 67 yards and it was 21-21 at halftime.

Luck’s 16-yard TD pass to Zach Ertz put Stanford back up 28-21.

Oklahoma State had a great chance to take the lead when Geoff

Meinken’s fumble was recovered by the Cowboys’ Markelle Martin at

the Cardinal 4-yard line. But Stanford’s defense held and Oklahoma

State settled for a 19-yard field goal by Quinn Sharp to cut the

lead to 28-24.

Williamson’s lone field goal, from 30 yards, boosted Stanford’s

lead to 31-24 three plays into the final quarter.

Oklahoma State responded again with a 13-play, 71-yard drive.

Weeden threw 17 yards to Blackmon for the score to tie it at 31

with 11:53 to play.

Again, Luck drove Stanford down the field, setting up Stepfan

Taylor’s 1-yard touchdown run that put the Cardinal up 38-31 with

4:34 to go in regulation. Oklahoma State matched it, converting a

fourth-down play on a slant pass from Weeden to Blackmon.

But the Cowboys scored too soon, considering how prolific

Stanford’s offense had been. Luck brought them downfield again and

set up for the potential winning field goal.

Despite the subsequent miss, there was still overtime. Stanford

got the ball first and Taylor gained five yards on first down. But

uncharacteristically he was caught for an eight-yard loss on second

down. Luck’s third-down pass gained just three yards, and

Williamson missed again.

Oklahoma State took over and Weeden threw to Colton Chelf, who

appeared to score. A review showed his knee was down at the 1,

though. Weeden purposely took a 4-yard loss to set up Sharp’s field

goal. It was good, and the turn of events was stunning on the

somber Stanford sidelines that had been poised to celebrate just a

few minutes earlier.

When Sharp’s 22-yard field goal sailed through the uprights at

the end, Oklahoma State led for the only time of the night. The

Cowboys dedicated the victory to the four people who were killed in

a November plane crash, including the school’s women’s basketball

coach Kurt Budke and assistant Miranda Serna.

The Cowboys were disappointed they didn’t get a chance to play

for the national championship, yet that didn’t at all factor in

their performance against Luck and the rest of the Cardinal.

”Every time we got down,” Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy

said, ”they just found a way to come back.”