Pre-Draft Player Rankings

52 Buster Posey (SF - C, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 42.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 146 539 82 14 80 6 .288
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 148 548 76 18 88 3 .305
Outlook: Posey had an underwhelming season -- by his standards -- in 2016. While his production was still good enough to rank in the top five among all catchers, he produced below the standard he set from 2012 to 2015. His home runs, RBI and OPS all decreased from 2015, but he did hit more doubles (33) and stole a career-high six bases. The lack of RBI can be attributed to the Giants' struggles at the top of the order in the first half of the season. Missing Hunter Pence to injury for the majority of the season also removed the All-Star catcher's protection in the lineup. Posey's swing and contact rates were right in line with his career percentages, so there is no sign of a significant decline in his approach at the plate. His numbers only seem disappointing when considering his draft day price. On the bright side, his down year may result in a reduced cost heading into next year's drafts. Posey will likely see his numbers bounce this season to his previous elite levels.
58 Gary Sánchez (NYY - C, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 52.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 53 201 34 20 42 1 .299
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 28 102 17 10 21 0 .294
Outlook: Well that's one way to make an entrance. Despite playing just one game in the majors before Aug. 3, Sanchez played his way into Rookie of the Year contention with one of the best 50-game stretches to begin a career of all time. The catcher hit 11 home runs in a 15-game span and ended with 20 homers and 42 RBI -- absurd numbers considering he played in just 53 contests. Though he seemed to run out of steam a bit at the end, hitting just .222 in September while striking out in more than one-third of his at-bats, the rookie still finished with a 1.032 OPS. It's highly unlikely his 60-homer pace will be sustainable over the course of a full season, but Sanchez will immediately jump toward the top of the list among the best -- if not the best -- offensive catchers next season, when he'll be just 24 years old.
66 Jonathan Lucroy (Col - C, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 68.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 142 490 67 24 81 5 .292
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 133 482 64 15 64 3 .288
Outlook: The Brewers sold Lucroy at the trade deadline, and he responded with a brilliant stint for the Rangers. He almost matched his homer total in 338 Milwaukee at-bats (13) during his 152 with Texas (11), and Lucroy quickly erased any doubts following his injury-marred 2015 campaign. The Rangers picked up his option basically hours after the 2016 World Series ended, which will keep him in one of the best run-producing spots of any catcher. The biggest fantasy question, though, is whether the 30-year-old will come close to repeating his career high in home runs. At Rangers Ballpark, he smacked six of them - one for every 12.5 at-bats there. Staying in Arlington bolsters his potential to do that again, to go along with his elite batting average profile (career .284 clip, 85.8 contact percentage). In most draft rooms, Gary Sanchez and Buster Posey will wind up as slightly more expensive options, but Lucroy could be acquired for less and easily outperform them, yielding the best profit of the trio.
107 Willson Contreras (ChC - C, LF)
Healthy
ADP: 109.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 76 252 33 12 35 2 .282
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 76 252 33 12 35 2 .282
Outlook: After taking a big step forward at the plate during his 2015 campaign at Double-A, Contreras raked at Triple-A Iowa to begin the season and forced his way onto the Cubs' 25-man roster in short order. Especially for a 24-year-old, his performance was impressive, as he continued to show a discerning eye (9.2 percent walk rate) while flashing 20-25 home run pop. Additionally, Contreras proved to be an above-average defender, which should give him the starting job again in 2017 regardless of what the team does with Miguel Montero. Although his overall line fell during the second half, Contreras cut his strikeout rate from 26.9 percent to 22.1 percent during that span. Moreover, Contreras demonstrated the ability to handle righties and lefties, swatting 10 of his 12 homers against the former while maintaining a slightly higher OPS against the latter (.854). Contreras' pop and run-production potential give him a chance to finish as a top-five catcher in 2017.
111 J.T. Realmuto (Mia - C)
Healthy
ADP: 112.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 137 509 60 11 48 12 .303
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 91 326 38 7 35 7 .282
Outlook: The stats haven't been flashy, but Realmuto's inspiring performance from 2016 was right in line with his offensive numbers in the minors. He gets extra fantasy pub for the dozen steals he accumulated last season, an asset that gets highlighted given the dearth of steals available at the catcher position. Still, the crux of Realmuto's future value is with the stick, not his legs. Counting on that speed from a player that has to get in a crouch 150 times a game sets buyers up for disappointment, particularly for one whose propensity for triples in 2015 dried up completely last season. Still, his pull-heavy tendencies could morph some doubles into home runs as he matures. As promising as last season was, however, Realmuto's lack of walks could very well come back to bite him as his unsustainable BABIP (.357 in 2016) comes back to earth, with the downside for a sub-.300 on-base percentage if the walks don't materialize. Be careful.
112 Evan Gattis (Hou - C, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 116.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 128 447 58 32 72 2 .251
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 130 461 55 27 71 1 .252
Outlook: The best news of all for Gattis is that with the acquisition of Brian McCann, the Astros will let Gattis focus on being the primary designated hitter and not have to worry about donning the tools of ignorance too often. Gattis set a career high with 32 homers last season, but with the uptick in power came a career-worst strikeout rate. Righties were a big problem for Gattis in 2016; even though he hit 22 of his 32 homers against right-handers, he batted .230 and struck out 29 percent of the time against them compared to .288 and 19 percent against lefties. He is projected to hit in the bottom half of the lineup, perhaps in between lefties McCann and Josh Reddick. Most importantly, Gattis retains catching eligibility in 2017.
136 Salvador Perez (KC - C, DH)
DTD
ADP: 135.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 139 514 57 22 64 0 .247
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 144 541 55 20 68 1 .255
Outlook: On the surface, Perez's 2016 season was essentially a repeat of the prior campaign, with a small, but not unreasonable drop in batting average. A closer look, however, reveals the lower average resulted from a disconcerting decline in contact rate, the skill Perez relies on most for production as he rarely walks and in recent years has carried a below-average BABIP. Digging deeper, Perez's numbers on fastballs didn't change, but his strikeouts rose precipitously when facing breaking pitches and changeups. On the plus side, Perez surpassed the 20-homer plateau for the second straight season, enjoying an increase in isolated power for the third consecutive year. The big question is whether the still just 26-year-old backstop will improve against offspeed and breaking stuff. He'll continue to play more than most at the position, so assuming Perez's stock takes a hit from the low average, there's a nice buying opportunity here.
143 Yasmani Grandal (LAD - C)
Healthy
ADP: 147.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 126 390 49 27 72 1 .228
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 123 374 46 19 56 1 .230
Outlook: Grandal was having a great season until he got injured in 2015, so for 2016, he mixed things up and got injured, then had a great season. Grandal had a brutal beginning to his campaign, ending the month of June hitting .179/.292/.347 after playing through the pain of forearm, wrist, and foot injuries. And then, he got better. From July 1 to the end of the season he hit .267/.376/.581 with 20 homers, superb numbers for a catcher. At his best, Grandal controls the strike zone like few hitters and simply crushes the ball when he makes contact, though he's still whiff-prone with a 22.9 percent career strikeout rate. There's little doubt that Grandal is an excellent player with rare value in OBP leagues when healthy, the problem is he's not healthy very often and will frequently play through injuries, even if they hurt his numbers. He enters 2017 as the clear starter in L.A. at catcher, with only Austin Barnes behind him to get an occasional start against lefties.
147 Russell Martin (Tor - C, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 163.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 137 455 62 20 74 2 .231
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 126 425 61 18 73 3 .252
Outlook: Martin had a brutal start to the season, hitting .150 over 60 at-bats in April. He was even worse in the final month, posting a .148 average in 81 at-bats. However, in the four months sandwiched between, Martin hit .295 with 16 home runs and 67 RBI. Overall, the catcher tallied similar numbers to what he had the previous year, although Martin's power dipped a bit in 2016. Most alarming about the veteran's recent campaign is the career-high 27.7 percent strikeout rate -- up from 20.9 percent in 2015 and up more than 10 percentage points from his career 17.4 percent mark. This could be a sign that Martin's bat speed is declining. Father Time is certainly chasing down Martin, but there doesn't appear to be another catcher in the organization ready to challenge him for the spot. He's only in the third year of a five-year, $82 million contract, putting him in position for another busy year at age-34 in 2017.
158 Yadier Molina (StL - C)
DTD
ADP: 161.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 147 534 56 8 58 3 .307
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 131 475 43 6 52 2 .288
Outlook: Coming off two consecutive seasons that saw his batting average, on-base percentage, and slugging percentage fall, Molina's start to the season seemed to confirm the fear that the former All-Star's tank was starting to run on empty. Then, seemingly out of nowhere, Molina's bat caught fire as he proceeded to hit .365/.398/.529 following the All-Star break. When all was said and done, he'd played a career-high 147 games and owned a .307/.360/.427 line. Such a resurgent season raises the question, just how much does Molina, who turns 35 in July, have left to offer? It's no secret that Molina is at the latter end of his career, and that he's played over 110 games at an incredibly demanding position every season since 2004 doesn't help his case for longevity. The catcher pool is top-heavy, giving Molina an opportunity to finish as a top-10 or top-15 backstop again.
163 Welington Castillo (Bal - C)
Healthy
ADP: 193.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 113 416 41 14 68 2 .264
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 111 379 37 15 57 1 .248
Outlook: Castillo put together a solid if unspectacular season for the Diamondbacks in 2016. The 14 home runs were the second most in a season for his career, and the 68 RBI were a new career high. Fantasy owners were probably hoping for even more in the power department after Castillo blasted six home runs in April, but his pace cooled. Castillo will replace Matt Wieters behind the plate in Baltimore after signing with the Orioles. He may also see some designated hitter opportunities on days where Caleb Joseph takes over behind the plate.
170 Cameron Rupp (Phi - C)
Healthy
ADP: 209.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 105 389 36 16 54 1 .252
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 68 240 21 8 29 0 .238
Outlook: Rupp worked he on his swing path last offseason, and he started hitting the ball with more authority, leading all hitters in exit velocity in early May, and he started hitting more of his flyballs out of the park. While Rupp's average exit velocity tailed off a bit, he still finished the season squarely among many of baseball's better hitters in that column. There is the potential for increased power output from Rupp if he can reverse the increase he saw in his groundball rate last season. Even with minimal change to his batted-ball profile, we should see more homers from Rupp this season as he is likely to earn more than the 389 at-bats he had in 2016. The primary concerns for Rupp's playing time are questions about his game calling and pitch framing, along with the presence of prospects Jorge Alfaro and Andrew Knapp. However, Rupp's bat is likely going to keep him in the lineup more often than not.
174 Brian McCann (Hou - C, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 199.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 130 429 56 20 58 1 .242
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 135 463 60 23 76 0 .235
Outlook: It took until the final day of the season to do it, but with a home run in his last game of 2016, McCann extended an impressive streak: reaching the 20-homer plateau in nine consecutive seasons. Though his batting average was also up 10 points to .242, the 32-year-old struck out on a career-high 20.1 percent of his at-bats and posted a .748 OPS -- well down from his career average. Further, the second-half emergence of top prospect Gary Sanchez effectively pushed McCann into a full-time DH role and led the Yankees to send McCann to the Astros during the offseason, where he will work in tandem with Evan Gattis. Carlos Beltran will likely occupy the DH spot most days, leaving McCann to push for playing time at first base on days when Gattis is behind the plate, but it would hardly be a surprise to see McCann's playing time volume fall from the 520-plus plate appearances he's averaged over the past three seasons.
183 Matt Wieters (Was - C)
Healthy
ADP: 203.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 124 423 48 17 66 1 .243
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 75 262 28 10 36 0 .260
Outlook: The 2016 plan for Wieters was to enjoy one more year in Camden Yards and hopefully have a healthy year, put up big power numbers, prove he was good enough behind the plate and get a new long-term deal this winter. Surprisingly, the defense came back quicker than the bat as Wieters looked like his old self behind the plate, but struggled to hit. He nearly posted career lows in each of the triple slash categories and his counting category totals were the lowest they have been in a full season since 2010. The power numbers come mostly from the left side while his better batting average has typically come from the right side. He was one of the best catchers on the free agent market, which helped him pick up a nice two-year, $21 million deal with the Nationals. Nationals Park is a fairly hitter-friendly environment, which could help Wieters bounce back at the plate in 2017 as the primary catcher in the nation's capital.
193 Tom Murphy (Col - C)
Healthy
ADP: 216.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 21 44 8 5 13 1 .273
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 16 40 6 4 11 0 .250
Outlook: A dreadful spring training left Murphy in the minor leagues to start the season, but the 25-year-old turned things around in a flash while catching for Triple-A Albuquerque. In 80 games with the Isotopes, Murphy throttled opposing pitchers for 26 doubles, seven triples, and 19 home runs to run his slash line up to a ridiculous .327/.361/.647. Though his strikeout and walk rates look horrific, both actually improved in 2016. The best part of it all is that the top prospect's power tool translated to the big leagues during his September callup, as he logged five home runs and two doubles in just 44 at-bats. An improvement in his K:BB ratio would be more than welcome for the Rockies and fantasy owners alike, but there's no denying that Murphy's power is ready to take stage in Denver. Now that Nick Hundley is out of the picture, the Rockies' starting catching job is Murphy's to lose.
207 Stephen Vogt (Mil - C, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 215.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 137 490 54 14 56 0 .251
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 119 401 46 14 54 0 .262
Outlook: A catcher-eligible player supplementing his playing time with frequent at-bats as designated hitter can provide a helpful advantage late in drafts. That's what makes Vogt's often pedestrian statistics look somewhat intriguing. In fact, there's not a whole lot to get excited about. While he makes a lot of contact, his batting eye doesn't shine, and he couldn't sustain his sudden on-base growth from 2015. Almost half of Vogt's batted balls turn into flies, which caps his average upside, and all those lofts haven't given him a power boost. In two-catcher leagues, he'll stand out among the No. 2 options for his almost guaranteed role in the middle of the batting order. But it's not a strong one, so he doesn't get a boost by proxy, and obviously, O.co Coliseum favors pitchers. While there's something to be said for a catcher with a floor of 10-15 home runs over around 500 at-bats, settling for him will make a drafter miss out on more exciting names.
228 Francisco Cervelli (Pit - C)
DL10
ADP: 220.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 101 326 42 1 33 6 .264
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 93 308 39 3 30 3 .286
Outlook: For the eighth time in nine MLB seasons, Cervelli missed significant action after breaking his hamate bone in June. Never known for power, the catcher hit just one home run (on Sept. 22) in 393 plate appearances. Cervelli's slash line of .264/.377/.322 varied little before or after surgery. While he offers little in the way of power -- his seven homers in 2015 represent a career high -- he does hold a .280 career batting average. The backstop, who's consistently been ranked among the top pitch-framers in baseball, signed a contract extension in the summer worth $31 million for three years. He'll see as much time as his fragile body allows as one of Pittsburgh's highest paid players.
252 Sandy Leon (Bos - C)
Healthy
ADP: 219.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 78 252 36 7 35 0 .310
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 46 143 17 3 14 0 .252
Outlook: Following the injuries of catchers Ryan Hanigan and Blake Swihart, Leon was called up in June to back up defensive specialist Christian Vazquez. He started off his major league campaign on a tear, posting a 1.074 OPS over his first 167 plate appearances, earning him the starting job from from the offensively struggling Vazquez, who batted just .227. The switch-hitting backstop mashed southpaws .373/.450/.612 (0.77 BB/K), while posting a modest .286/.337/.427 line against righties (0.25 BB/K). Although his bat cooled off a bit (.213/.286/.253 in September), the 28-year-old still slashed .310/.369/.476 in 78 games after being called up. Leon also led the Red Sox in innings behind the plate, catching 600.1 innings last season, earning the trust of manager John Farrell in the process. Even if Boston doesn't add an alternative to the depth chart before the start of spring training, Leon is only a marginal bet to open 2017 as Boston's starter. He'll likely only deliver occasional utility in two-catcher mixed fantasy leagues.
352 Manny Piña (Mil - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 33 71 4 2 12 0 .254
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 33 71 4 2 12 0 .254
Outlook: Pina broke into the majors last season for the first time since 2012 after the Brewers traded away Jonathan Lucroy, giving him a backup role behind Martin Maldonado. That call-up rewarded four years of patience after his last ride with the Royals, one that saw him outrighted from Kansas City and later traded twice, the latter landing him in Milwaukee as a player to be named in the Francisco Rodriguez trade. Between those major league stints, Pina turned into a minor league masher. His .329/.371/.506 line at Triple-A Colorado Springs in 2016 made him a Pacific Coast League All-Star, so it might not be too crazy to think he's a late bloomer at age 29. Of course, Colorado Springs helps make plenty of bats look better than they are. Still, his .254/.346/.394 line in the majors was also decent for a catcher, though in a very limited sample of 81 plate appearances. Jett Bandy and Andrew Susac sit ahead of him on the depth chart entering spring training, so Pina will likely open the year back at Triple-A.
373 Austin Hedges (SD - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 8 24 2 0 1 0 .125
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 32 80 8 2 6 0 .163
Outlook: Always lauded for his ability behind the plate as a defense-first catching prospect, Hedges had a breakout at Triple-A El Paso in 2016 with a surge of power (21 homers) and a strong .326/.353/.597 line before he was promoted to San Diego in September. With Derek Norris in tow, the Padres were hesitant to leave Hedges on the Opening Day roster as a backup, and the decision to give him regular playing time at Triple-A appears to have paid off. Hedges has benefited from his time in the Pacific Coast League by playing half of his games at El Paso over the past two seasons, but his career .326/.361/.583 line at Triple-A suggests that he has nothing left to prove in the minors. The Padres certainly must have thought so, as they dealt Derek Norris to the Nationals to clear the path for Hedges to become the team's workhorse backstop. His developing power and low strikeout rate (career 16.6 percent in the minors) make him a useful cheap option in two-catcher formats.
374 Mike Zunino (Sea - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 55 164 16 12 31 0 .207
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 99 317 32 15 40 0 .192
Outlook: Zunino's career .195 batting average, 32.4 percent strikeout rate and 16.6 percent swinging-strike rate clearly paint him as a hacker. He finally proved in 2016, however, that he can tap into the home-run upside many have been yearning for from his bat for years - along with a bit of gravy in his 10.9 percent walk rate. This progression resembled the 10.7 percent free-pass rate he showed at Triple-A last season. Of course, that happened in his third stint at the highest farm level -- so it's not entirely surprising that he conquered it. He will still whiff frequently at major-league breaking balls. Even with his flaws, however, he still carries some intrigue. Carlos Ruiz's backup duty aside, Zunino may remain the priority for playing time. Landing a backstop on the cheap with a difference-making skill could lead to a useful fantasy profit. Zunino's power fits that bill, but his batting average could cripple a roster.
375 Derek Norris (FA - C)
Suspended
ADP: 222.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 125 415 50 14 42 9 .186
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 133 438 54 13 53 5 .235
Outlook: Tepid interest from other clubs at the trade deadline kept Norris in San Diego during the second half of 2016, as his .186/.255/.328 line was easily the worst he's produced since becoming a big league player in 2012 with the A's. Defensively, he's become a steady option behind the dish, but his struggles last season included a career-high 30.3 percent strikeout rate and the second consecutive season with a walk rate (7.9 percent BB%) below his career norm (9.2 percent). Two injuries may have contributed to his struggles -- the first was a hand contusion suffered after he was hit by a pitch in May, and the second was a left elbow injury sustained after he was struck by a bat while catching in early July -- and the only semblance of typical production came in between those ailments when he hit .273/.318/.506 with five of his 14 home runs in June. The Padres dealt Norris to Washington in the offseason, although he'll have to settle for a backup catching gig as long as Matt Wieters is healthy.
378 Travis d'Arnaud (NYM - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 75 251 27 4 15 0 .247
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 83 292 35 10 32 0 .250
Outlook: The party line with d'Arnaud has always been plus power potential but can he stay healthy? Entering 2017, it's now fair to question the pop as he's declining in that department. Of course, the multitude of injuries have curtailed growth and catchers often hit the power peak later in their career, so there's still reason for optimism. A right rotator cuff strain cost d'Arnaud most of the first half and he never got it going after returning. The backstop's solid strikeout rate remained intact to go along with a league-average hard contact rate; there's still a reasonable batting average floor, especially for a catcher. However, 2016 featured a big drop in flyballs and HR/FB, resulting in a weak .076 ISO. The second-half struggles resulted in d'Arnaud ceding primary catching duties to Rene Rivera, putting his 2017 role in flux. He's plenty young enough to turn things around, but he needs to demonstrate last season's power outage was a blip, and stay healthy.
379 Devin Mesoraco (Cin - C)
DL10
ADP: 221.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 16 50 2 0 1 0 .140
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 51 160 19 8 28 1 .250
Outlook: If 2015 was a disaster following his breakout season, 2016 can only be described as a nightmare for Mesoraco. The year started off poorly for the backstop, as he missed the beginning of spring training while rehabbing from his 2015 hip surgery. Soon after he got onto the field, more injuries surfaced. His season ended in late April and he ultimately underwent a pair of surgeries to fix his shoulder (which was more damaged than initially believed) and the labrum in his other hip. The results on the field were not pretty: a career-worst .140 batting average with one extra-base hit in just 16 games played. The Reds are intent on having Mesoraco back behind the dish in 2017, but given his health history and the rigors of the positions, it's best to set expectations fairly low heading into the 2017 campaign.
382 Jason Castro (Min - C)
Healthy
ADP: 222.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 113 329 41 11 32 2 .210
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 114 377 41 12 40 1 .215
Outlook: Best known for his receiving skills, Castro failed to hit above .225 or break 15 home runs for the third straight year, although he saw plenty of at-bats as Houston's primary catcher over that span. Castro has been a particular liability in leagues that penalize strikeouts, as he's whiffed at an increasing rate each of the past three years, topping out at a whopping 33 percent in 2016. Castro hit particularly poorly against left-handed pitching ( .149/.237/.241). A former top-10 pick, Castro was once a promising power hitter who hit 18 homers and slugged .485 in 2013 so he still has some upside. His offensive numbers have been on the decline ever since, but his defensive skills and pitch-framing ability are seen as elite. He'll be the primary catcher for the Twins after signing a three-year, $24 million contract.
1 2 3 4 5
of
9