West Indies 286-5 at lunch on day 4, 1st test vs New Zealand

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) West Indies opener Kraigg Brathwaite was dismissed for 91 as New Zealand claimed three wickets before lunch Monday to edge toward victory in the first cricket test at the Basin Reserve.

At lunch the West Indies were 286-5 in their second innings, needing 100 runs to make New Zealand bat again.

Brathwaite resumed at 79 not out and had led the West Indies resolute rally from a 386-run deficit, when their second innings began, to 172 runs by stumps on Sunday when they were 214-2. That position unraveled a little during a morning session Monday when the West Indies lost three wickets for 72 in 31 overs.

All now depends on the performance of the lower order. Sunil Ambris, who was out hit wicket to the first ball of his test career in the West Indies’ first innings of 134, was 18 not out at lunch and wicketkeeper Shane Dowrich, coming off a century in his most recent test against Zimbabwe, is 3 not out.

Captain Jason Holder, who also made a century against Zimbabwe – the second of his career – is the only other recognized batsman before the bowlers Kemar Roach, Miguel Cummins and Shannon Gabriel.

Brathwaite shared partnerships of 72 for the first wicket with Kieran Powell (40) and 94 for the second with Shimron Hetmyer (66) and appeared to be the main obstacle to New Zealand’s effort to take a 1-0 lead in three test series.

But the West Indies had added only 17 to the overnight total when Brathwaite was out, trapped lbw by left-arm spinner Mitchell Santner. New Zealand’s appeal initally was rejected by the umpire, who thought the ball had come from bat onto pad. A review by the television umpire showed the ball had taken the back pad first.

Shai Hope batted for 160 minutes for 37 until he was surprised by the bounce of a delivery from Trent Boult, took the ball high on the bat and sent the ball off a thick edge to New Zealand captain Kane Williamson at gully.

Roston Chase (18) then dragged a delivery from Matt Henry back onto his stumps.

There is still little seam movement for the New Zealand bowlers. The ball isn’t swinging in warm conditions and the short delivery still remains the New Zealand pace attack’s best weapon.

Neil Wagner took 7-39 using that weapon in the first innings and has begun to trouble the West Indies batsmen again.