Federal case coming against Sandusky?

Federal prosecutors and FBI agents in Pennsylvania are looking into opening a federal investigation into accused child molester Jerry Sandusky, NBC News reported Friday.

According to the report, a senior law enforcement official said investigators are "looking hard" at the possibility of opening their own investigation in light of allegations that the former Penn State assistant football coach committed abuse outside state lines.

"It would be inconceivable that we couldn’t find grounds" to make this a federal case, the official told NBC News.

Sandusky, 67, is accused in a 40-count indictment of sexually abusing eight boys over a period of 15 years. He denies the charges.

According to the 23-page grand jury presentment, one of Sandusky’s alleged victims — referred to as "Victim 4" — testified to being "repeatedly subjected to Involuntary Deviate Sexual Intercourse and Indecent Assault" at various locations, including Penn State bowl games in Florida and Texas during the 1998 and 1999 seasons.

Victim 4 testified he traveled to the 1998 Outback Bowl in Tampa and the 1999 Alamo Bowl in San Antonio as a guest of the football team, its coaching staff and their family members.

Police in San Antonio announced last week they were investigating the possibility of building a criminal case against Sandusky over the alleged offenses in Texas.

According to NBC’s report, federal investigators are also examining New York-based children’s charity Fresh Air Fund after it confirmed Wednesday that Sandusky hosted as many as six kids dating back to the 1970s in conjunction with the out-of-state organization.

Prosecutors and agents will also review Sandusky’s use of the internet to determine if he violated federal laws by communicating or possibly recruiting alleged victims online, NBC reported.

The US Department of Education announced last week it would launch its own investigation into whether Penn State violated federal law by failing to report allegations of sexual abuse on campus.