Pain Train Keeps Rolling for Alabama Crimson Tide

Crimson Tide offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin was apparently watching, because he took the chain off true freshman Jalen Hurts against Mississippi State.

When Alabama coach Nick Saban speaks, you should listen. Because when asked he will tell you exactly what he’s thinking.

Look no further then this week’s press conference, where Saban stated that Alabama needs to do a better job pressing the ball downfield and brought up several wide receiver talents – stressing the importance of getting them more involved in games.

Lane Kiffin was apparently watching, because he took the chain off true freshman Jalen Hurts against Mississippi State. Kiffin dialed it up and Hurts went pass-happy Saturday, favoring the air over the ground as Alabama carved up Mississippi State like a Thanksgiving turkey.

The offensive MVP, other than Hurts, was future All-Pro ArDarius Stewart – who has all the tools to be a force at the next level for a long time. From the first play of the game until Saban pulled him, Stewart he was a force to be dealt with – grabbing three touchdown passes and 156 yards. Hurts had a bright day also, only to be soured by two turnovers.

It seems like true freshman Hurts has to have a couple of series under his belt before he gets going, but other than those freshman mistakes his skills continue to shine through en route to an impressive 347-yard, four-touchdown day.

One other offensive standout was Josh Jacobs, who stepped up in place of nicked-up running back Damien Harris for a very respectful 100 yards rushing and a touchdown.

No one on the Alabama defense appeared to be too sleepy for the 11 a.m. kickoff. The only points allowed by the Alabama defense came off of a pass interference call and a Bulldog field goal. As predicted here and elsewhere, Mississippi State quarterback Nick Fitzgerald was going to run into the buzz-saw known as Alabama.

This Alabama team is on a mission to be undefeated, and Chattanooga is next aboard the pain train next Saturday.

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