The Latest: Peyton Manning remembers his friend Pat Summitt

FILE - In this April 8, 2008, file photo, Tennessee coach Pat Summitt holds up the net as her son, Tyler, looks on after Tennessee beat Stanford 64-48 to win its eighth national women's basketball championship, at the NCAA women's basketball tournament Final Four in Tampa, Fla. Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who uplifted the women's game from obscurity to national prominence during her career at Tennessee, died Tuesday morning, June 28, 2016. She was 64. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
Gerry Broome/AP

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) The Latest on Pat Summitt, the former Tennessee women's coach who died Tuesday morning at age 64. (all times local):

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7:30 a.m.

Peyton Manning is remembering his friend Pat Summitt.

He says she “was always very supportive of my career and I enjoyed seeing her back at a Tennessee football game or when she would come to Indianapolis to see Tamika Catchings play.”

Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who helped boost the women's game to the big time in a 38-year career at Tennessee, has died. She was 64.

Manning played football at Tennessee, leading the Volunteers to the 1997 SEC championship his senior year.

“She was one of the people I consulted with following my junior year when I was deciding whether to turn pro early or stay in college. She gave me some very valuable advice during that time. My teammates and I went to a lot of Lady Vols games when we were in school, and I really enjoyed watching her teams play.”

The recently retired Denver Broncos quarterback says he will “miss her dearly, and I am honored to call her my friend. My thoughts and prayers are with Tyler and their entire family.”

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6:30 a.m.

Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who helped boost the women's game to the big time in a 38-year career at Tennessee, has died at 64.

With an icy glare on the sidelines, Summitt led the Lady Vols to eight national championships and prominence on a campus steeped in the traditions of the football-rich south until she retired in 2012.

Her son, Tyler Summitt, issued a statement Tuesday morning saying his mother died peacefully at Sherrill Hill Senior Living in Knoxville surrounded by those who loved her most.

Tyler's statement said “since 2011, my mother has battled her toughest opponent, early onset dementia, 'Alzheimer's Type' … and we can all find peace in knowing she no longer carries the heavy burden of this disease. “