Preds GM Poile will not travel with U.S. Olympic team to Sochi

After being hit in the head by an errant puck on Thursday, David Poile, the general manager of U.S. Olympic hockey and the Nashville Predators, will not travel with the team to Sochi on Sunday.

U.S. Olympic hockey and Nashville Predators general manager David Poile will not depart to the Winter Olympics in Sochi with the national team after being hit in the face by an errant puck on Thursday.

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Nashville Predators general manager David Poile, who also is serving as the general manager of the U.S. Olympic hockey team, will not travel with the main group on Sunday to the 2014 Sochi Olympics after getting hit in the head with an errant puck on Thursday.

The Predators released a statement on Friday that said Poile underwent two facial surgeries in the "nose and eye areas and received stitches to repair a facial laceration." The statement also said he is resting and recovering and will remain in the hospital for further observation and that it has yet to be determined when Poile will return to Nashville.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press reported that Poile underwent the procedures at Regions Hospital in St. Paul. Citing Minnesota state senator Karin Housley, the wife of Predators' assistant coach Phil Housley, the paper reported Poile had between 30 and 40 stitches.

The Predators' statement also said that Poile "does look forward to joining Team USA during the Olympics."

The United States' first game is on Thursday against Slovakia.



The Predators were in Minnesota on Thursday to play the Wild when Poile was struck by a puck during the morning skate as he stood in the walkway between the team's bench and locker room. Poile left the Xcel Energy Center on a stretcher and was taken to the hospital.

Poile, who will turn 64 next Friday, is the third-longest tenured general manager in NHL history. He has spent 31 consecutive years at the helm of a franchise, 15 with Washington and the past 16 with the Predators. He is the only general manager in the franchise's history. His son Brian is the team's director of hockey operations.

As general manager of the U.S. Olympic team, his role was mainly that of picking the players and coaches on the team. With that task completed on Jan. 1, the large majority of his duties have been fulfilled.