Rangers manager still hot about transfer rule after ejection

Rangers manager Ron Washington knew he would be ejected for arguing a call overturned by replay review, but he had a point to make.

Texas Rangers manager Ron Washington gets ejected from the game after arguing with home plate umpire Paul Schrieber during the sixth inning against the Seattle Mariners at Globe Life Park in Arlington.

Kevin Jairaj / USA TODAY Sports

ARLINGTON, Texas -- Rangers manager Ron Washington knew he would be ejected for arguing a call overturned by replay review, but he had a point to make.

His point: the new interpretation of the transfer rule has to be changed.

"I understand what the rule is," Washington said. "But we've got to do something about it."

Washington came out of the dugout Monday night after a replay review overturned a force-out at the plate, giving the Mariners their sixth run in an eventual 7-1 win over the Rangers. A manager is automatically ejected for arguing a call after it is reviewed.

The broadened use of replay is also new this season, but it wasn't the result of the three minute, 30 seconds review that had Wash upset, but the rule the decision was based on.

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"I know what the rule says," Washington said. "We've certainly got to do something about it, but that's the rule. I knew that when I went out there."

The call came in the sixth inning when the Mariners loaded the bases with one out. Seattle's Brad Miller grounded back to pitcher Pedro Figueroa, who threw back to catch J.P. Arencibia for the force-out at home.

After Arencibia caught the ball, he stepped toward first base and bobbled the ball as he made the exchange to his throwing hand.

The bobble initially cost Arencibia a chance at an inning-ending double play as he never made a throw to first. After Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon asked for a review, the bobble wound up costing the Rangers even more.

"If he's catching the ball at the same time and he drops it, I understand. I understand what the rule is saying. I just don't agree with it," Washington said.

"It was obvious he caught the ball. The runner [from third] was at least nine or 10 feet from home plate. [Arencibia was] making his move away from home plate so he doesn't have contact. He goes to get the ball and he drops it."

Arencibia was charged with an error on the play, one of three errors the Rangers made in a ragged inning.  The Mariners scored one more run, on a sacrifice fly, after the call was overturned.

Third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff and right fielder Alex Rios made the other errors as the Mariners batted 11 times in a six-run inning.

"A pop-up we didn't catch. A ground ball double play we didn't make," Washington said. "And from that point on, they swung the bat and made us pay for it."

The defensive miscues only compounded the troubles the Rangers have had on the offensive side. The Rangers have scored just one run in three of their last four games.

Follow Keith Whitmire on Twitter: @Keith_Whitmire