The Latest: Turkey starts to bury police killed in bombing

ISTANBUL (AP) The Latest on the twin explosions near an Istanbul soccer stadium (all times local):

12:45 p.m.

Funeral services have already begun at Istanbul's police headquarters for some of the officers slain in twin bombing attacks near the city's soccer stadium.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister Binali Yildirim and other top officials were in attendance as police carried the coffins of their comrades draped in the Turkish flag.

The death toll from the twin blasts Saturday night near Besiktas stadium rose Sunday morning to 38, including 30 police officers, seven civilians and one more person whose identity had yet to be determined. Another 155 people were wounded.

There has been no claim of responsibility for the blasts.

12 noon

The Turkish Football Federation has condemned the attack near a stadium in Istanbul and announced that one minute of silence will precede all matches in Turkey's professional and amateur soccer leagues on Sunday and Monday.

Flags at all stadiums will be placed at half-staff and there will be no music played during matches.

The flags around the soccer stadium in Besiktas, where the attack took place Saturday night, were already flying low.

Turkey's Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said the death toll from the twin blasts had risen to 38, including 30 police officers, seven civilians and one more person whose identity had yet to be determined.

11:40 a.m.

Turkey's Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said the death toll from twin blasts near an Istanbul stadium had risen to 38.

He said the figure included 30 police officers, seven civilians and one more person whose identity had yet to be determined.

The minister also put the number of wounded at 155 and said a total of 13 suspects had been detained in connection with the attack Saturday night.

Soylu says 136 people are still hospitalized from the attack, 14 of them in intensive care and five undergoing surgery.

11:25 a.m.

Turkey's pro-Kurdish People's Democratic Party, or HDP, has condemned the attack in Istanbul near a soccer stadium that left 29 dead and 166 wounded.

The party's central executive committee released a statement on Sunday ''strongly condemning'' the attacks and saying it ''felt great sadness and shared in the sorrow.''

The statement added: ''In both domestic and foreign policy, Turkey must be a model and more importantly a political actor of peace, democracy and human rights. It is essential that the politics, language, tone and practices that causes tension, polarization, enmity and clashes immediately cease.''

There has been no immediate claim of responsibility for the Saturday night attack by a car bomber and a suicide bomber. This year Istanbul has witnessed a spate of attacks attributed by authorities to the Islamic State group or claimed by Kurdish militants. A state of emergency is in force following a failed July 15 coup attempt.

11 a.m.

Turkey's state-run Anadolu Agency says 19 of the 166 people wounded in twin blasts near a soccer stadium in Istanbul are in intensive care.

Quoting sources Sunday in the office of the Istanbul governor, it says 155 others are also still receiving medical treatment after the blasts Saturday night.

Attacks Saturday night by a car bomber and a suicide bomber near Istanbul's Besiktas soccer stadium were the latest large-scale assault to traumatize a nation confronting an array of security threats. There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

10:50 a.m.

Turkey has declared a national day of mourning after twin blasts in Istanbul killed 29 people and wounded 166 others near a soccer stadium.

The Sunday statement from Prime Minister Binali Yildirim's office also ordered flags to fly at half-staff across the country and at Turkey's foreign missions.

Twin attacks Saturday night by a car bomber and a suicide bomber near Istanbul's Besiktas soccer stadium were the latest large-scale assault to traumatize a nation confronting an array of security threats. There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus told the private news channel CNN Turk that ''arrows point to the PKK.'' He was referring to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party, which has waged a decades-long insurgency. Authorities, he said, had determined that about 300-400 kilograms of explosives were used in the attack.