Meyer 'won't be ignorant' with latest health issue

Ohio State coach back on the field as Buckeyes begin spring practice.

Ohio State coach Urban Meyer, right, laughs with cornerback Armani Reeves during NCAA college football practice Tuesday, March 4, 2014, in Columbus, Ohio.

Jay LaPrete / AP Photo

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Urban Meyer doesn't do anything half speed and has a history of pushing himself too hard, so there's no such thing as a "minor" health scare when it comes to Ohio State's 49-year old head coach.

Last weekend Meyer had a cyst removed from his head in "a short medical procedure," as Ohio State termed it in a Monday night news release. He was on the practice field Tuesday as Ohio State opened spring drills, and after that practice he said he's "good to go."

We have to hope he's telling the truth.

"I'm not going to be ignorant like I was before," Meyer said. "If something happens, I'm going to get it fixed."

Meyer said the procedure was done to take care of a problem that's bothered him "for several years." The schools release said the congenital arachnoid cyst was first found in 1998, and Meyer said it "surfaced in 1998, in 2004, and a couple other times."

The procedure was done to alleviate pressure and headaches Meyer has been having lately.

Steve Mitchell/USA TODAY Sports


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The games go on. So does the preparation, even in early March.

"I feel great," Meyer said on Tuesday evening, before offering a correction. "Not great, but good."

Stomach and heart issues forced Meyer into what became a short-lived resignation from Florida in 2009, and he stepped away for what became a sabbatical after the 2010 season.

Before he was hired by Ohio State in November 2011, Meyer signed a contract with his wife and three children promising them he would take better care of himself -- including eating and sleeping better and exercising regularly -- upon returning to coaching.

Meyer said doctors told him to be cautious of how long he screams during spring practices -- "I'm serious," he said -- and how long he blows the whistle.

Meyer has had no other known health issues since returning to coaching. That he's cleared for spring practice is a positive sign, and it's on Meyer to know his limits and listen to his doctors if anything changes.

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