Magic Wands: Orlando Magic vs. Charlotte Hornets

CharlotteHornets

17-14

OrladoMagic

15-18

Time/TV: 7 p.m./FSFlorida
Line: Hornets by 4
Tickets: $29-$1,287 on SeatGeek
Season Series: Hornets 109, Magic 88 in Charlotte on Dec. 9; Tonight in Orlando; March 10 in Charlotte; March 22 in Orlando

Pace Off. Rtg. Def. Rtg. eFG% O.Reb.% TO% FTR
Charlotte 98.9 104.8 103.0 49.4 20.6 11.9 29.9
Orlando 97.5 100.5 104.7 48.8 21.4 12.9 24.5


1) Aaron Gordon’s second 30-point game of the season provides hope his move to small forward will work, Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel writes.

2) Andrew Sharp of Sports Illustrated writes it is tough to trust anybody in the Eastern Conference.

3) The Orlando Magic have slowly built their confidence and now have an offense that is producing points.

4) On the other side, the Orlando Magic have played some strong defense the last two games and they hope to keep it going.

5) Aaron Gordon and Elfrid Payton are starting to come into their own together in their third years, John Denton of OrlandoMagic.com writes. Monday’s game showed the Class of 2014 for the Magic is doing just fine.

6) Kemba Walker is establishing himself as one of the best point guards in the league, joining the league’s elite, Jeff Jacobs of the Hartford Courant writes.

7) On the latest Orlando Magic Daily Podcast, I discuss how the Charlotte Hornets have built their team and become a perennial Playoff team in the East.

8) Jeremy Lamb is facing a bit of a minutes squeeze in Charlotte for the Charlotte Hornets. But Jerry Stephens of Swarm and Sting explains how he can still be a valuable asset.

9) The Minnesota Timberwolves supposedly want some frontcourt help and it does not take a leap to see the Orlando Magic as a potential partner, Alvaro Grullon writes.

10) Orlando Magic guard Elfrid Payton said Kemba Walker is the toughest player to defend in the NBA.

11) Rhett Koonce reviews the takeaways from Charlotte’s last-second loss to the Brooklyn Nets on Monday.

12) Jonathan Tjarks of The Ringer writers there are too many big men in the NBA, and they all seem concentrated on the same teams.

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