Pre-Draft Player Rankings

2 José Altuve (Hou - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 4.8
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 161 640 108 24 96 30 .338
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 158 646 93 15 74 41 .331
Outlook: All Altuve did was take his improbable 2015 season to the next level with an amazing 2016 season. In the AL Tout Wars auction last March, he went for a stunning $43, but in the end, he earned every bit of it as a five-category stud. Altuve improved his walk rate to a career-high 8.4 percent (from 4.8 percent in 2015) and, following suit with the rest of the league, hit for more power. A new power baseline for Altuve is tough to figure out, but his ISO and hard-hit rate progression in recent years suggests 15-20 homers annually is reasonable. Still just 26, he has played nearly every game over the past five seasons and rarely gets himself out. Even when he does chase pitches out of the strike zone, he still makes enough contact to put the ball safely into play and uses his speed to turn outs into hits. Altuve has reached 30 steals in five straight seasons and with a powerful lineup around him, he is an easy top-10 pick for 2017.
19 Robinson Canó (Sea - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 20.6
CHG: -0.2
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 161 655 107 39 103 0 .298
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 158 625 89 25 88 4 .299
Outlook: Who'd have thought Cano's career high in home runs would come when he was playing his home games at Safeco Field? Well, in 2016, he did just that, while also reaching his best runs total in a much-improved Mariners offense. The long balls were backed up by his highest flyball rate since 2010, and they were helped by more time removed from his double sports hernia surgery to fix the woes that sapped his power in 2015 and perhaps 2014. The 34-year-old has compiled a batting average lower than .290 just twice in 12 years. Can he sustain such high averages as he ages while keeping low walk rates (6.4 percent and 6.6 percent the last two years)? He hits the ball hard enough to believe he will. Cano won't realistically revisit the double-digit steals from 2014, but he's arguably the most stable four-category second baseman not named Jose Altuve. Cano warrants second-round consideration.
22 Trea Turner (Was - 2B, CF)
Healthy
ADP: 26.9
CHG: +0.1
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 73 307 53 13 40 33 .342
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 50 174 29 7 20 18 .328
Outlook: Turner didn't have anything more to prove in the minors, but the Nationals sent him back to Syracuse anyway so he could hit .302/.370/.471 in 331 at-bats with 25 steals before finally getting a long-overdue promotion. If he was frustrated by his slow progress up the ladder, he took it out on opposing pitchers. While his .342 batting average was the product of an unsustainable .391 BABIP, his contact rates and batting averages have always been excellent, and 33 steals in 73 big league games isn't out of line with his minor league theatrics on the basepaths. The real surprise was the power he flashed at the highest level. After hitting just 19 home runs in 268 minor league games, Turner slugged 13 in 73 games with Washington. If that power proves to be even partially sustainable (and his 16.7 percent HR/FB rate, while high, wasn't outrageous), the Nats suddenly find themselves with a 23-year-old five-category shortstop, and a future pillar of the franchise.
38 Brian Dozier (Min - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 43.5
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 155 615 104 42 99 18 .268
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 156 614 106 31 82 17 .249
Outlook: Dozier has become one of the top fantasy options at second base due to his surging power and added speed. He was having a typical season through the first half (14 home runs, .786 OPS) but surged in the second half with 28 home runs and a .990 OPS over his last 72 games, finishing with 42 homers (the most ever for an AL second baseman). While that home run total may look like a fluke given the large leap from his previous career high (28), there are reasons to think he can approach that level again. Dozier has seen his slugging percentage increase every season in the majors and most of his other statistical measures were in line with his career, although he did have a high 18.4 percent HR/FB rate. Dozier doesn't draw walks at a great rate and strikes out a little too often, which makes his batting average a risk, but he should continue running while frequently hitting in the leadoff spot where he's been most comfortable.
46 Rougned Odor (Tex - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 56.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 150 605 89 33 88 14 .271
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 128 472 61 19 66 8 .265
Outlook: A popular sleeper heading into 2016, Odor did anything but stink up the joint, instead cashing in as one of fantasy's most profitable players. Despite his pint-sized build (5-foot-11, 195 pounds), he ranked third in home runs among second basemen and tied for 21st overall. He launched more flyballs than in his 2015 rookie stint, and Odor enjoyed one of the league's most significant improvements in his rate of infield pop-ups (19.1 percent in 2015, 8.2 percent in 2016). He was getting more out of his aerial attacks with an apparently more effective bat path through the zone. That should keep him above 20 taters, even with regression. The 14 stolen bases (thanks to his elite base running rating) and .271 batting average -- despite his low walk rate -- look repeatable. Of course, those looking for a great batting average won't find it: He's an aggressive pull-hitting hacker. Fantasy players in on-base-percentage leagues may want to avoid overpaying. Even with his contact flaws, however, the four-category production makes him one of fake baseball's best second basemen, especially pertaining to power.
56 Daniel Murphy (Was - 2B, 1B)
DTD
ADP: 52.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 142 531 88 25 104 5 .347
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 138 542 74 16 78 7 .304
Outlook: The adjustments Murphy made at the plate that turned him into a playoff hero in 2015 with the Mets weren't just a short-sample mirage after all. He continued to hit balls harder (career-high 38.2 percent hard-hit rate), higher (career-high 41.9 percent flyball rate) and farther (career-high average of 280.6 feet on flyballs) than he ever had before, resulting in -- you guessed it -- a career year that landed him in second place in NL MVP voting. Pitchers weren't able to find a hole in his new approach as the season progressed either, as his first half and second half splits were almost identical, right down to the .985 OPS in both halves. The only thing that slowed him down was a leg injury that limited him to 55 games in the second half, but he was still healthy enough to hit .438 in 16 postseason at-bats. Nagging lower-body injuries are definitely a red flag for a 31-year-old second baseman, especially one that didn't really have a step to lose, and the 21 games Murphy played at first base last year may have been a precursor to a more permanent move, especially if Ryan Zimmerman never returns to form. The offense Murphy supplied in 2016 is more than adequate for a shift down the defensive spectrum, though, even if it's taken on faith that he'll have some regression in his performance, despite the strong indications to the contrary.
61 Dee Gordon (Mia - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 73.7
CHG: +0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 79 325 47 1 14 30 .268
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 124 516 76 2 31 51 .302
Outlook: Gordon was suspended 80 games in late April for PEDs, and was hitting a mediocre .266 with six steals at the time. He returned in late July to hit .268 the rest of the way, adding 24 valuable second-half steals. Swiping 30 bags in half a season matched expectations although the average was lower than anticipated. Gordon hit his usual number of line drives and bountiful grounders, but not as many resulted in hits. The difference between .265 and .305 is one seeing-eye grounder or infield hit a week, so a rebound in average is likely. Those that were on Gordon for his plentiful steals should have no real reason to reconsider, especially since the cost of acquisition has dropped.
64 Matt Carpenter (StL - 3B, 1B, 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 71.0
CHG: +0.3
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 129 473 81 21 68 0 .271
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 147 547 94 19 70 3 .272
Outlook: Consistency has been the name of the game for Carpenter, who recorded a batting average above the .270 mark for the third consecutive season. While this has become expected from the 30-year-old, he drastically improved his patience at the plate. As a result, he finished the season with a .380 on-base percentage and was regularly the club's leadoff hitter. Naturally, the switch to hitting first came with a drop in RBI as he knocked in just 68 runs, nearly 20 fewer than he did in 2015, but he could move back down in the order following the addition of Dexter Fowler. He'll be highly valuable no matter where he hits in the order. It's worth noting that Carpenter dealt with an oblique injury that landed him on the disabled list for nearly a month in the second half of the season, but if he can stay healthy, Carpenter should have no problem reaching 20 home runs for the third straight year.
68 Ian Kinsler (Det - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 77.0
CHG: +0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 153 618 117 28 83 14 .288
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 156 642 104 19 83 13 .287
Outlook: It had been four years since Kinsler hit as many as 20 homers in a season, but he took full advantage of the power market in 2016, jacking 28 balls out of the yard. While 15 second basemen hit 20-plus homers last season, Kinsler was one of just six who added double-digit steals, and one of just three who hit 25-plus homers with 10-plus steals. He also scored 117 runs by getting on base 34.8 percent of the time and running the bases effectively. The last time Kinsler hit this many home runs, his HR/FB was 12.5 percent. It was also that same percentage in 2016 but those bookended five seasons of six-to-seven percent figures. He does not run as well as he once did, but he has posted double-digit steals in every season of his career and has been double-double in steals and home runs each of the past six seasons. As long as he is hitting in front of Miguel Cabrera he can fall into 85 runs, but don't bank on him hitting 20 homers again.
71 Jean Segura (Sea - 2B, SS)
Healthy
ADP: 72.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 153 637 102 20 64 33 .319
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 147 570 73 10 48 26 .277
Outlook: Entering 2016, Segura was being labeled a disappointment after being traded by Milwaukee in the offseason following poor showings in 2014 and 2015. He proceeded to set career highs in nearly every major offensive category in his first season with Arizona, and he was one of just four players to record at least 30 steals and 20 home runs (Paul Goldschmidt, Jose Altuve and Mike Trout were the others). He was aided by a career-high .355 BABIP (he was under .300 the previous two seasons), so some regression to his .319 batting average is inevitable. Nobody is expecting a repeat of his 2016 performance, especially after he was dealt to the Mariners this offseason, as he will be in a much worse park and will have to deal with a league switch. Some owners will fade him entirely, so while he will cost a lot more to obtain in 2017, the price tag won't come close to reflecting what he did last season.
73 Jason Kipnis (Cle - 2B)
DTD
ADP: 103.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 156 610 91 23 82 15 .275
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 142 558 79 13 58 16 .274
Outlook: Kipnis has now put together two consecutive solid fantasy seasons, albeit of different flavors. In 2015, he hit for a very high average and hit at the top of the lineup, setting the table for the bigger bats. Last season, he became one of those bigger bats, sacrificing some contact for power and driving the ball more in the air versus into the ground. He set a career high in home runs and runs and nearly did so in RBI. The days of 20-plus steals appear to a thing of the past, and the trade-off is that he is now a more well-rounded categorical player. He is a tough player to forecast because he has a rather large statistical variance in most categories over the past five seasons, and making matters worse, a shoulder injury has clouded Kipnis' availability for the start of the season. This makes for tricky roster planning, but Kipnis has returned profit in four of the past five seasons, and the cost is now dropping as a result of the shoulder issue.
75 DJ LeMahieu (Col - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 103.2
CHG: +0.3
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 146 552 104 11 66 11 .348
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 148 537 83 7 56 15 .307
Outlook: LeMahieu flew under the radar a bit in 2015 despite putting together a solid year, but he made the league take notice with his 2016 showing. After putting up a solid .746 OPS in 2015, he broke out to the tune of a .348/.416/.495 line, winning the National League batting title. He also put up career highs in doubles (32), RBI (66) and runs (104). The All-Star even muscled up for 11 home runs, equaling the number he hit over the previous two years combined. Thanks to all of this and an outstanding 0.83 BB/K, LeMahieu has become a steady mid-tier option at the keystone, but the longevity of his current levels of production will hinge on his future with the Rockies. He's under club control with Colorado through the 2018 campaign. LeMahieu hit .303/.353/.395 with four of his 11 homers on the road in 2016, while his output soared to a .391/.473/.591 line at Coors Field.
99 Ben Zobrist (ChC - 2B, LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 106.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 147 523 94 18 76 6 .272
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 140 520 84 14 61 6 .273
Outlook: After helping Kansas City to their first World Series title in 30 years, Zobrist was signed to a four-year deal with the Cubs last offseason. He played a huge role in winning their first World Series in 108 years. A jack of all trades, Zobrist reached base at a .386 clip, his best OBP since 2009. He spent most of the year hitting fourth and fifth in the lineup, allowing him to collect 76 RBI, his most since 2011. At 35 years old, Zobrist isn't going to be swiping many bags any more, but he has proved an incredibly consistent fantasy performer, hitting between .270 and .284 with between 76 and 94 runs scored for five years in a row. With regular playing time and multi-position eligibility in a Cubs lineup that trailed only the Rockies in runs and OPS in the National League, Zobrist figures to be a solid option deployed in a similar fashion by manager Joe Maddon in his second season on the north side of Chicago.
115 Dustin Pedroia (Bos - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 137.2
CHG: +0.2
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 154 633 105 15 74 7 .318
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 127 522 74 11 56 5 .297
Outlook: There were a lot of different things going on with the Red Sox last season: the David Ortiz retirement tour, the Pablo Sandoval spring training sideshow, and the emergence of young studs Xander Bogaerts and Mookie Betts. All this hoopla allowed Pedroia's season to fly under the radar for the most part, although it truly shouldn't have. The franchise second baseman was incredibly productive all year long, producing his highest batting average (.318) and hit total (201) since his MVP season in 2008. He even had a power surge, bashing 15 home runs and 36 doubles en route to raising his slugging percentage to .449, tied for his best mark over the past five seasons. Pedroia certainly doesn't possess the speed he once did, but as long as he stays on the field, it's realistic to expect a batting average around .290 with double-digit home runs and generous helpings of runs and RBI once again in 2017.
162 Javier Báez (ChC - 3B, 2B, SS)
Healthy
ADP: 142.6
CHG: +0.1
Depth: SS-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 142 421 50 14 59 12 .273
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 74 237 26 8 28 6 .245
Outlook: Baez became a fixture in the Cubs' lineup in 2016, showing an improved eye (career-low 24.0 percent strikeout rate) and punishing left-handed pitching at a .311/.375/.475 clip. Thanks to his excellent defensive work, Baez emerged as a regular against righties, and while his .258/.288/.401 split line leaves plenty of room for improvement, he dropped his strikeout rate (v. RHP) from 31.7 percent in 2015 to 26.4 percent last season. Still only 24 years old, Baez has the tools necessary to become an elite offensive contributor in the middle infield. Although he struggled during the World Series, Baez's performance in the NLCS garnered MVP honors in that series, and his home run in Game 1 of the NLDS against the Giants helped spark the team's run to its first World Series title since 1908. With further improvement to his plate discipline, Baez could approach 20 homers and 20 steals in 2017, even if he's technically in a utility role to open the season.
168 Jonathan Schoop (Bal - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 186.6
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 162 615 82 25 82 1 .267
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 128 458 55 19 55 2 .251
Outlook: At 25 years old, Schoop has established what he is at the big league level: a free swinger with lots of power potential that will punish mistakes when pitchers make them. He has also established that he is more than willing to limit his effectiveness by chasing pitches that he should spit on, playing right into the pitcher's plan. In fact, Schoop had the majors' fourth-worst rate of swinging out of the zone in 2016 and one of the 10 worst rates over the past three years. Schoop is like teammate Manny Machado in that he does most of his power damage against righties (48 of his 57 homers). Unlike Machado, Schoop does have issues against lefties. His career batting average is 32 points worse and his strikeout rate is six percentage points higher against southpaws. Keep that in mind for daily fantasy matchups or weeks with multiple lefty starters projected.
202 Devon Travis (Tor - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 213.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 101 410 54 11 50 4 .300
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 82 314 46 10 42 4 .299
Outlook: Travis missed the first 47 games of his sophomore season as he recovered from shoulder surgery, a hand injury in mid-August cost the second baseman a few more contests, and Travis even missed some playoff action due to a knee ailment. When healthy, he proved that his surprise production in 62 games the previous season was no fluke. While his production has been stellar thus far on a per-plate-appearance basis, Travis finds himself in what appears to be a golden era of offensive production at the keystone. Last year's .785 OPS would have ranked fourth among second basemen in 2014, but in 2016 it was only good for 16th at the position. Travis hit .309 from atop the batting order, but he needs to improve on his .323 OBP as the table-setter to lock down the leadoff spot. He still has to prove he can stay healthy for a full season. Travis is expected to be fully healthy for the start of spring training after undergoing knee surgery in November.
225 José Peraza (Cin - 2B, SS)
Healthy
ADP: 189.9
CHG: +0.5
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 72 241 25 3 25 21 .324
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 40 132 14 2 13 12 .311
Outlook: The Reds split Peraza's season between Triple-A Louisville and Cincinnati, with the bulk of his time in the big leagues coming during the second half of the season. The overall production was better against the more difficult competition, as Peraza's contact-heavy approach (12.9 percent strikeout rate) and top-end speed enabled him to post an impressive line at the plate and on the bases in 72 games with Cincinnati. Once Billy Hamilton hit the disabled list in September, Peraza moved into the leadoff spot for his final 25 starts, but he slotted in as the team's No. 2 hitter directly behind Hamilton for a brief stretch in late August. In most leagues, Peraza qualifies as a shortstop and outfielder to begin 2017, and in some, he may also qualify at second base. Thanks to the deal that sent Brandon Phillips to the Braves over the offseason, the top prospect finally will have a full-time spot in the Reds lineup. With a full season's worth of starts, Peraza has the tools to push the 40-steal plateau in 2017.
244 Jedd Gyorko (StL - 2B, 3B, SS)
Healthy
ADP: 202.0
CHG: +0.1
Depth: 3B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 128 400 58 30 59 0 .243
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 122 407 43 19 56 1 .233
Outlook: At a glance, Gyorko's .243 batting average and .801 OPS may come off as fairly standard. However, he slugged 30 home runs over 128 games, resulting in an unfathomably-low 59 RBI. Most of his power was seen when facing righties, against whom he had a .536 slugging percentage opposed to a .417 mark against southpaws. After hitting just 10 and 16 home runs in 2014 and 2015, respectively, skepticism as to whether or not last season's amount of muscle can be repeated is entirely justified. Defensively, he was used all around the infield for St. Louis last season, but in 2017 he is expected to start at third base against righties and move over to second base to spell Kolten Wong against southpaws. Having never hit above .250, Gyorko's upside is almost strictly tied to his ability to hit for power, which will likely regress somewhat in 2017.
251 Neil Walker (NYM - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 217.0
CHG: +0.3
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 113 412 57 23 55 3 .282
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 134 489 67 21 67 3 .274
Outlook: Walker was acquired by the Mets to replace the departed Daniel Murphy at second base. His season ended prematurely in late August, and he needed back surgery in early September to repair herniated discs. To that point, he was enjoying an outstanding campaign, matching his career-best 23 homers and sporting the second-best batting average of his career. Despite the procedure requiring a three-month recovery, the Mets extended Walker a qualifying offer for 2017, which he promptly accepted. Walker's 2016 power surge was a result of lofting more batted balls in tandem with recording his highest HR/FB% in the bigs. Walker's home parks are slightly favorable to left-handed power, suggesting he's likely to undergo a regression in HR/FB, regardless of health. If healthy, Walker is a solid middle-infield option, likely available at a discount as many will chase the shining stars populating the second base and shortstop positions.
282 Starlin Castro (NYY - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 217.5
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 151 577 63 21 70 4 .270
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 145 551 58 15 68 4 .276
Outlook: Already a three-time All-Star entering his age-26 season, Castro was shipped away from the Cubs following a disappointing 2015 season and the emergence of young middle infield depth that made him disposable. Playing full time at second base for the first time, he socked a career-best 21 home runs in his first year in the Bronx and hit .270, but it wasn't all good for Castro. He continued to walk at a very low clip and saw his contact rate slip below 80 percent for the first time. Further, the speed element of his game that led to at least 20 steals in two of his first three seasons has all but disappeared, as he only attempted four steals in 2016. Nevertheless, his first season with the Yankees marked an improvement overall and he ultimately raised his OPS over 60 points from the year before to .733.
283 Logan Forsythe (LAD - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 218.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 127 511 76 20 52 6 .264
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 130 451 59 14 49 6 .262
Outlook: Forsythe started off like a house afire in 2016, slashing .341/.426/.610 in April, but he missed a month with a shoulder injury and was up-and-down the rest of the way. He finished with a .233 average over his final 116 at-bats. The veteran hit a career-high 20 homers while posting career highs in HR/FB rate (14.7 percent), hard-contact rate (36 percent) and ISO (.180), marking a second consecutive season of improved power numbers. Still just 29 years old, Forsythe would appear primed for another season of useful production in multiple categories if he can avoid the injury bug, although a batting average rebound is certainly no lock. Following an offseason trade to the Dodgers, he enters 2017 with a firm hold on the starting second base job and is a strong candidate to lead off.
284 Joe Panik (SF - 2B)
DTD
ADP: 221.0
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 127 464 67 10 62 5 .239
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 100 372 52 6 39 3 .280
Outlook: At first glance it appears that Panik took a huge step back in 2016. His batting average -- considered his greatest asset -- took a dive from .312 in 2015 to .238 last season. Luck played a big role in the steep decline, as his .245 BABIP was nearly 100 points lower than the .343 and .330 marks he had in his rookie and sophomore campaigns respectively. A midseason concussion from a fastball to the head cost Panik a month of playing time, and it took him some time to get comfortable at the plate even after returning from the disabled list. It's encouraging that Panik's 90.0 percent contact rate was right in line with his career marks, and he continued to spray the ball to all fields. His .140 isolated power keeps him in the 30-double and 10- to 15-homer range over the course of a full season. Assuming his BABIP returns to .300-plus range, we could see a bounceback season from Panik in 2017.
285 Ryan Schimpf (SD - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 222.0
CHG: +0.1
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 89 276 48 20 51 1 .217
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 89 276 48 20 51 1 .217
Outlook: As his eight-year line as a minor league player attests (.249/.349/.481), Schimpf has always possessed raw power, but he was never given an opportunity to see if he could survive against top-level pitching prior to 2016. After an impressive start to the season at Triple-A El Paso (15 homers in 190 plate appearances, 1.161 OPS), he forced the major league team's hand. He proceeded to deliver a 20-homer campaign in just 89 big league games. There were plenty of warts, however, as he hit just .217 thanks to a 31.8 percent strikeout rate. To make matters worse, he hit .171 with a 39.6 strikeout percentage during the final month of the season, raising questions as to whether the league had simply figured him out. Most likely, the Padres will begin the season with Schimpf getting the bulk of the playing time at the keystone, as they do not have a ready platoon partner, but he's hardly guaranteed a long leash if he struggles out of the gate. Cory Spangenberg and Carlos Asuaje (who are both also left-handed) loom as replacement options.
290 Brandon Phillips (Atl - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 219.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 141 550 74 11 64 14 .291
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 137 533 62 10 62 13 .285
Outlook: Dat Dude really isn't all that anymore. Now, he did top a .290 batting average for a second straight season and again reached double digits in both home runs and stolen bases, but even so, he finished outside the top 15 fantasy second basemen. He grows more impatient at the dish with each passing season: his walk rate fell to just 3.1 percent in 2016 and his chase rate leaped to a career-high 41.7 percent. His 92 wRC+ for the season ranked 122nd among qualified hitters (out of 146), and for the first time in a long time, Phillips graded out as a net negative in the field. The Reds finally managed to deal the veteran to Atlanta, where Phillips will fortunately get the opportunity to play everyday. However, the Braves might hand the reins over to Ozzie Albies later in the seaon, which could lead to fewer opportunities for the aging second baseman. Between this and further skills regression with age could result in Phillips losing 15-team mixed-league relevance. Invest at your own risk.
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