Pre-Draft Player Rankings

1 Mike Trout (LAA - CF, LF)
Healthy
ADP: 2.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 157 589 109 27 97 33 .323
2014 Projections 117 430 82 20 58 31 .312
3 Year Average 112 424 86 21 65 29 .314
Outlook: At the end of last season, many wondered whether Trout could repeat his fabulous 2012 campaign. As it turns out, the phenom outfielder actually improved upon his numbers in 2013, increasing his walk rate from 10.5% to an outstanding 15.4%, and finishing the season with a final batting line of .323/.432/.557, good for an almost other-worldly 179 OPS+. The main concern from Trout's 2012 breakout seemed to center on his seemingly unsustainable .383 BABIP, but he was able to defy logic once again, posting a .376 BABIP in 2013. While this number, too, seems like it should decline, it may be that his baseline is such that the number proves to be one of skill thanks to his combination of elite power and speed, rather than good fortune. Trout was once again denied the AL MVP award in 2013, but the 22-year-old looks like he's going to be the one of the best players in the game for many years to come, regardless of how much hardware he has to show for it. He will no doubt be among the first players taken in nearly all 2014 fantasy drafts.
4 Andrew McCutchen (Pit - CF)
Healthy
ADP: 5.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 157 583 97 21 84 27 .317
2014 Projections 162 597 102 25 90 26 .303
3 Year Average 157 583 97 25 90 23 .302
Outlook: McCutchen enters his age 27 season with a shiny new NL MVP Award under his belt. His league-leading 8.2 WAR in 2013 included 21 homers, 27 steals, 97 runs scored and a .911 OPS. He saw action in 157 games, making it four straight years McCutchen's played in at least 154 contests. Cutch wrecked left-handed pitching to the tune of a .388 batting average and 1.130 OPS, which was actually worse than his 2012 numbers (.392 BA and 1.141 OPS). After tailing off the past couple seasons, the Pittsburgh center fielder avoided a late-season collapse at the plate. McCutchen is in the prime of his career and could easily contend for a second straight MVP in 2014.
5 Carlos Gonzalez (Col - LF, RF)
DL60
ADP: 7.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 110 391 72 26 70 21 .302
2014 Projections 124 476 81 24 80 20 .296
3 Year Average 124 463 84 25 82 20 .300
Outlook: Gonzalez was enjoying his best statistical season since his breakout 2010 campaign until a sprained finger cost him a large chunk of time toward the end of the season, marring his final counting numbers. Although Gonzalez’s strikeout rate spiked nearly eight points to 27.1 percent, the more aggressive overall approach helped him successfully reverse the declining power trend he had shown the previous two seasons. It remains to be seen if those power-hitting skills can be maintained after Gonzalez chose to forego surgery on the injured digit in the offseason, but the outfielder’s batting average and steals numbers have otherwise held steady as he’s dealt with an assortment of injuries the last few seasons. Now 28 years old, Gonzalez remains in the prime of his career and could very well submit an MVP-caliber campaign, but injury issues may forever loom as a potential stumbling block. In fact, his injury risk could increase in 2014 with an impending move to center field, likely exposing him to more diving and running defensively. Still, his five-category potential over a full season of health is too enticing to ignore. Gonzalez may be slowed early in spring training after having an appendectomy in mid-January, but he should have enough time to recover and be ready for Opening Day.
10 Adam Jones (Bal - CF)
Healthy
ADP: 12.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 160 653 100 33 108 14 .285
2014 Projections 155 617 85 29 81 14 .274
3 Year Average 158 623 90 30 91 14 .284
Outlook: Jones has turned into a model of consistency. You can pretty much count on a .280 average, 30 home runs and double-digt steals. Leagues that have OBP or OPS continue to suffer from Jones' inability to take walks, while his 0.18 BB/K ratio in 2013 was a career worst. Jones is entrenched in Baltimore's outfield for at least four more years and he is a very safe fantasy bet provided that he maintains the isolated power levels that he's displayed over the past two seasons (.218 and .208, respectively).
11 Ryan Braun (Mil - RF, LF)
Healthy
ADP: 13.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 61 225 30 9 38 4 .298
2014 Projections 122 465 81 28 86 22 .327
3 Year Average 122 462 82 28 87 22 .320
Outlook: Braun was routinely selected among the top five picks in 2013 fantasy drafts, but he let down both his owners and fans by accepting a 65-game suspension for performance-enhancing drugs and finishing the season with just 61 games played. He'll get a fresh start in 2014, at least from a fantasy perspective, but questions linger regarding how much of his top-end production from seasons past was artificially enhanced. Despite the uncertainty, the fact remains that Braun owns a .938 career OPS. He'll move to right field this year but almost certainly remain the third hitter in a quality lineup. Braun could slide a bit in drafts due to questions about his numbers, as well as his general unpopularity among certain owners, but few players in his range on cheat sheets possess his upside, making him a tantalizing late first-round option.
16 Bryce Harper (Was - LF)
Healthy
ADP: 18.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 118 424 71 20 58 11 .274
2014 Projections 125 468 90 23 58 14 .291
3 Year Average 128 478 84 21 58 14 .272
Outlook: You can't exactly say that Harper had a sophomore slump given that his OPS, walk and strikeout rates all improved, and his counting stats were nearly identical to those of his rookie season, despite the fact that he saw 100 fewer at-bats. However, owners who expected him to have a Mike Trout-like explosion in his second tour of duty were sorely disappointed. The all-world talent and relentless drive to improve are still there, but the big question with Harper is whether last season's injuries were a direct result of his full throttle playing style or simply bad luck. Given the potential rewards, it's hard not to gamble on the latter.
18 Jacoby Ellsbury (NYY - CF)
DTD
ADP: 21.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 134 577 92 9 53 52 .298
2014 Projections 131 516 84 14 55 35 .298
3 Year Average 122 513 85 15 61 35 .302
Outlook: Ellsbury once again proved to be an impact hitter atop Boston's lineup with game-changing baserunning skills in 2013. He did nothing to hurt the big payday he got this offseason. Everything he does will pale in comparison to his MVP-caliber season in 2011 - the 32 bombs he hit that season are an outlier - but Ellsbury slugged .426 and had a .781 OPS last season, second-best of his career in both categories. The Yankees inked Ellsbury to a seven-year, $153 million deal in December, and he will set the table for fellow free-agent additions Carlos Beltran and Brian McCann in pinstripes.
19 Carlos Gomez (Mil - CF)
DTD
ADP: 25.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 147 536 80 24 73 40 .284
2014 Projections 104 408 63 17 45 28 .255
3 Year Average 126 394 63 17 49 31 .264
Outlook: Gomez posted an .809 OPS after the All-Star break in 2012 and followed that up with a career year in 2013, posting best-ever numbers in virtually every category. The combination of power and speed he provides is rivaled by few in the fantasy realm, as his totals of 43 home runs and 77 stolen bases over the last two seasons were matched by only Mike Trout and Alex Rios. Each of Gomez's 2013 slash numbers were the best of his career, and he is just entering his prime years, as he will be only 28 years old during the 2014 season, and it's possible that he could be even better.
23 Giancarlo Stanton (Mia - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 27.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 116 425 62 24 62 1 .249
2014 Projections 124 454 76 34 76 4 .284
3 Year Average 130 463 72 32 78 4 .268
Outlook: A pitiful April (.227/.341/.387 in 20 games) followed by a six-week stint on the disabled list with a hamstring injury frustrated Stanton over the first half of the season, but the powerful outfielder got back on track down the stretch, posting a .272/.392/.558 line with 11 home runs over his final 41 games. Though 2013 will go down as a disappointment in the eyes of some, Stanton managed to put up a career-best 14.7 percent walk rate over 504 plate appearances, and his strikeout rate, contact rate and flyball percentage all remained in line with his career norms. Stanton sits with an impressive 117 home runs in his first four major league seasons -- an average of 39 long balls per 162 games played -- and at 24 years old, the 6-foot-6 slugger simply needs to stay on the field to remain a favorite for the NL home run crown. It doesn't hurt that he should also chip in excellent run production (thanks to the walk rate) regardless of who surrounds him in the lineup.
25 Yasiel Puig (LAD - RF, CF)
Healthy
ADP: 28.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 104 382 66 19 42 11 .319
2014 Projections 137 514 88 26 52 14 .323
3 Year Average 104 382 66 19 42 11 .319
Outlook: Puig electrified the team and the city from Day 1 of his big league debut June 3, knocking two hits in his debut and two home runs in Game 2. He had his ups and downs as pitchers started adapting to his free-swinging ways, but Puig also adapted himself, taking more pitches as the season wore on. The end result was a .319/.391/.534 slash line that included 19 homers and 11 stolen bases in 382 at-bats. He's certainly a work-in-progress, but coming off a .925 OPS rookie season, the sky appears to be the limit.
34 Jose Bautista (Tor - RF, 1B, CF, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 35.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 118 452 82 28 73 7 .259
2014 Projections 114 408 71 26 61 6 .245
3 Year Average 120 432 84 33 80 7 .271
Outlook: After a hip injury cut short his 2013 campaign, Bautista was given a clean bill of health in November. He has missed significant chunks of time in each of the last two seasons, but is still one of the more dangerous hitters in the game. Bautista continues to post excellent strikeout rates for a power hitter, though his consistently low line-drive rate holds down his BABIP and thus, his batting average. There was a bit of a power decline in 2013, as Bautista posted his lowest slugging percentage (.498) since breaking out in 2010. A healthy season might give Bautista a chance to match his 2010-11 level of production, though it seems more likely that he'll settle in as something a bit less than that at the age of 33. Even if he's just the player that we saw in 2012 and 2013, that would still leave Bautista as one of the better power-hitting outfielders in the American League.
35 Justin Upton (Atl - LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 41.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 149 558 94 27 70 8 .263
2014 Projections 153 573 102 25 70 17 .281
3 Year Average 153 568 102 25 75 16 .278
Outlook: Upton's first month in a Braves uniform was the stuff of legends, as he clubbed a whopping 12 home runs in April and appeared to be headed for a career year. Over the next three months of the season, however, Upton managed just four home runs. He got hot again in August, and finished with a team-leading 27 big flies, but it was at times a frustrating season for his fantasy owners. After recording 18-plus steals in each of his previous four seasons, Upton attempted just nine steals in 2013, as manager Fredi Gonzalez played it safe on the basepaths, and his strikeout rate jumped dramatically from 19.3 percent to 25.0 percent. By no means was it a terrible year for Upton, but he didn't live up to his price tag, and his 17.9 percent HR/FB rate is likely unsustainable. Moreover, a rebound in batting average is not necessarily a lock, as his BABIP was still above .320.
36 Jay Bruce (Cin - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 41.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 160 626 89 30 109 7 .262
2014 Projections 153 580 91 31 91 8 .266
3 Year Average 157 590 87 32 102 8 .258
Outlook: It took Bruce 20 games to hit his first homer of the season, and he ended April with the sole long ball. He subsequently hit a combined 17 homers in May and June, perfectly illustrating his streakiness. There is some hope that Bruce is entering his prime years, but 2013 didn't bring any evidence - just more of the same. Mind you, 30-100 seasons aren't bad by any measure, but he hasn't improved his contact rate at a point in his career where that next step should take place. A power spike could theoretically happen, but owners shouldn't rely upon him becoming a high-average, elite power hitter.
38 Alex Rios (Tex - RF, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 48.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 156 616 83 18 81 42 .278
2014 Projections 139 559 75 16 63 22 .258
3 Year Average 153 586 80 19 72 25 .271
Outlook: Rios was a deadline acquisition by Texas in 2013, posting a .772 OPS with the Rangers and a .749 OPS with the White Sox. While the power and batting average were around his career norms, his 42 steals (including 16 in just 47 games with Texas) were a career high. While he's certainly been a speed threat in the past (34 steals back in 2010), it's hard to envision him swiping 40-plus again. It's possible, but you shouldn't value him with those expectations. He should benefit, however, from having a more talented lineup around him in Texas than he did in his final seasons on the south side of Chicago.
41 Shin-Soo Choo (Tex - CF, LF, RF, DH)
DL15
ADP: 49.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 154 569 107 21 54 20 .285
2014 Projections 139 502 81 14 47 19 .275
3 Year Average 131 493 77 15 52 18 .278
Outlook: Reds general manager Walt Jocketty quietly pulled off a huge trade for the second offseason in a row, landing exactly what the Reds needed in Choo. Slotted at the top of the lineup for virtually every game, Choo had a massive performance in his walk year, getting on base at a .423 clip while posting a 20-20 season. He was miscast as a center fielder, but the Reds easily won the offense-for-defense exchange. One worrisome note -- he has continued to struggle against left-handers since suffering a broken thumb in 2011, and he hit .215/.347/.265 against them last season in 181 at-bats. As a result, Choo does not appear to be far from the point where he will need to be platooned. The Rangers signed Choo to a seven-year, $130 million deal in December, where he will likely slot in as the leadoff hitter for a potent Texas lineup.
46 Matt Kemp (LAD - CF, LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 58.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 73 263 35 6 33 9 .270
2014 Projections 112 428 73 24 69 18 .311
3 Year Average 113 423 75 23 76 19 .305
Outlook: Kemp suffered a second consecutive injury-plagued season in 2013, playing in just 73 games due to hamstring and ankle injuries. Pile on offseason shoulder surgery, and Kemp enters 2014 with a lot to prove. Kemp's 2014 will be his age-29 season, so in theory he could have another 2011 ahead of him, but the recent track record of injuries make it easy to be pessimistic. Kemp by all accounts is a hard worker, so he could come to camp 100 percent, play in 155 games, and go 30/30, but don't pay a premium to find out if he's still capable of reaching that level.
51 Matt Holliday (StL - LF)
Healthy
ADP: 54.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 141 520 103 22 94 6 .300
2014 Projections 139 516 89 23 82 3 .304
3 Year Average 141 522 94 24 90 4 .297
Outlook: Holliday posted solid numbers yet again as a key part of the Cardinals' World Series run. His peripherals all fell within his career norms indicating that the 34-year-old slugger is still one of the game's better, and more consistent hitters. He posted one of the lowest strikeout rates (14.3%) of his career, which if repeatable means that Holliday should remain a solid offensive threat in 2014 assuming he can stay healthy. The Cardinals' lineup projects to be just as potent as last season, if not more, making Holliday one of the safer plays in most drafts, albeit one that occasionally slides down the draft board because his ceiling isn't as high as it used to be.
54 Ryan Zimmerman (Was - 3B, LF)
DL15
ADP: 59.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 147 568 84 26 79 6 .275
2014 Projections 132 512 69 20 67 4 .273
3 Year Average 131 514 76 21 74 5 .280
Outlook: For a guy whose final numbers always seem fairly consistent, Zimmerman is an amazingly streaky player. This time around, he limped into September with just 15 home runs and concerns that his shoulder issues might finally have sapped his power, but those concerns vanished after an 11-homer barrage to close out the season. His 79 RBI were the lowest total of his career, but that was as much due to the offense around him as his own early-season struggles. If you roster Zimmerman, odds are good that at some point he'll seem like a wasted investment, and at some point he'll be the hottest hitter in the majors.
57 Starling Marte (Pit - LF, CF)
Healthy
ADP: 70.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 135 510 83 12 35 41 .280
2014 Projections 90 353 54 10 28 31 .303
3 Year Average 91 338 50 8 26 26 .275
Outlook: A finger injury suffered Aug. 19 prematurely ended Marte's breakout season -- he saw just 27 of his 510 at-bats after the injury. The 25-year-old batted .280/.343/.441 with 12 homers, 35 RBI and 41 stolen bases (in 56 attempts). He ranked second in the NL with 24 Hit-By-Pitches. His 10.2 UZR and 20.1 UZR/150 ratings were the best among qualified NL left fielders. Despite a horrendous 25:138 BB:K ratio, Marte offset that number with a .363 BABIP -- which was actually his second lowest mark in five pro seasons. Expect more of the same from Marte in 2014. At some point, the team might move Marte out of the leadoff spot, but only if an adequate replacement can be found.
58 Hunter Pence (SF - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 67.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 162 629 91 27 99 22 .283
2014 Projections 156 606 85 23 88 10 .269
3 Year Average 159 617 87 24 100 12 .284
Outlook: Pence truly had a sensational year in 2013 after it seemed that his career was trending downwards in 2012. He hit .283/.339/.483 with 27 homers, 99 RBI and a solid 133 wRC+ while starting all 162 game for the Giants. The biggest surprise was Pence's newfound speed, as he stole more than 20 bases for the first time in his career. And it wasn't just a case of Pence taking off more often, as he was caught stealing just three times, leading to the best success rate (88.0%) of his career. Pence announced in spring training that he would be more active on the basepaths in 2013 and he stuck to his word. Now that Pence is once again a threat on the basepaths, the rest of the league may start paying more attention to him next season. Otherwise, there is nothing in Pence's underlying numbers that indicate he can't repeat his offensive statistics in 2014.
62 Allen Craig (Bos - 1B, LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 66.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 134 508 71 13 97 2 .315
2014 Projections 104 402 63 17 77 3 .341
3 Year Average 109 392 60 15 76 3 .311
Outlook: Craig finally got a shot as a full-time player in 2013, but he wasn't able to take full advantage due to some nagging injuries that held him to 563 plate appearances. Craig's HR/FB (11.2%) rate was unusually low in 2013, which could be the result of pitchers throwing him fastballs just 28.1% of the time, down from 33.3% the season before and 37.0% in 2011. His BABIP (.368) also suggests that there may be some decline in the batting average department, although he's carried a .345 BABIP as a big leaguer thanks to a steady supply of hard contact. Craig is still in his prime at age 29, and he could have a monster season in 2014 in the heart of a potent Cardinals lineup.
65 Wil Myers (TB - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 75.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 88 335 50 13 53 5 .293
2014 Projections 132 506 83 23 82 7 .316
3 Year Average 88 335 50 13 53 5 .293
Outlook: After starting the year with Triple-A Durham, Myers made his much-anticipated debut in the middle of June and the slugging began. An elite prospect acquired in the offseason trade of James Shields to the Royals, he helped lead the Tampa Bay offense to the postseason en route to the AL Rookie of the Year Award. After his call to the majors, the Rays put together a 52-36 record in games in which he appeared. In those 88 games, he hit .293/.354/.478 with 13 homers, 23 doubles and 53 RBI. He hit all over the batting order from second through sixth with the Rays shuffling lineups and matchups. He still has a slight tendency to strike out, with 93 on the year with the Rays, but his aggressiveness swinging at the first pitch shows as a useful tool, as eight of his 13 long balls came on first-pitch swings. Myers and teammate Evan Longoria will be fixtures in the middle of the order in Tampa Bay for a long time and he will quickly be establishing his spot as one of the better power-hitting corner outfielders in all of baseball.
67 Yoenis Cespedes (Bos - LF, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 78.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 135 529 74 26 80 7 .240
2014 Projections 132 513 72 26 78 14 .277
3 Year Average 132 508 72 24 81 12 .264
Outlook: Cespedes continues to be a mix of amazing and frustrating at the same time. He can make plays on both offense and defense that convince scouts and fans than he is on the verge of superstar status, but he hasn't been able to put it all together to this point. Cespedes hit 26 home runs in just 135 games, but his stolen bases dropped into the single digits. Cespedes carried a .240 batting average on the year and put up an average over .240 in only one month of the season, when he closed out the year by hitting .314 in September. Cespedes clearly has a ton of power and natural talent, but he needs to avoid minor injuries -- he has missed over 25 games in each of his first two seasons -- to even approach the lofty expectations set for him. He also needs to learn how to hit while behind in the count, as he was utterly miserable with two strikes on him, slashing .130/.175/.216 in at-bats that reached a two-strike count.
70 Jason Heyward (Atl - RF, CF)
Healthy
ADP: 84.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 104 382 67 14 38 2 .254
2014 Projections 125 470 78 21 55 11 .264
3 Year Average 130 455 70 18 54 11 .253
Outlook: Three weeks into the 2013 season, Heyward, who had hit just .121 to that point, was forced to undergo an emergency appendectomy, and he continued to struggle immediately upon his return in mid-May. Slowly but surely, Heyward began heating up (.312 average in June), and he was off to a nice start to the second half before a broken jaw, the result of being drilled by a fastball, put him back on the shelf in August. All in all, Heyward hit .254/.349/.427 with 14 home runs and just two steals in 104 games. His ISO fell by nearly 40 points (from .210 to .173), and he took off on the basepaths a mere six times. There were some positive takeaways, however, as Heyward improved upon his strikeout rate dramatically (from 23.3 percent in 2012 to 16.6 percent), while also walking more frequently. He bettered his average against lefties by 40 points, and hit .322/.403/.551 after moving atop the batting order. Heyward is a likely candidate to lead off for Atlanta in 2014, and he's an obvious candidate to bounce back at the dish, after hitting just .199/.321/.323 on the road last year.
77 Jayson Werth (Was - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 97.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 129 462 84 25 82 10 .318
2014 Projections 114 424 61 16 50 11 .285
3 Year Average 120 441 65 17 57 12 .277
Outlook: After two seasons in which he became the poster boy for ill-advised giant contracts, Werth mostly stayed off the disabled list and exploded for full-season career highs in all three slash numbers. His days as a 20-steal threat appear to be over, but at least he's proven he's still capable of providing solid power numbers and a plus batting average. Whether Werth can stay healthy enough to continue supplying them, however, is a question that might be better left for another owner to answer.
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