Pre-Draft Player Rankings

15 Buster Posey (SF - C, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 15.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 147 547 72 22 89 0 .311
2015 Projections 141 534 71 19 82 0 .313
3 Year Average 148 532 70 20 88 1 .314
Outlook: While Posey did not quite rebound to an MVP level in 2014, he returned more rotisserie value than any catcher and finished sixth in the NL MVP voting. Posey has displayed remarkable durability since his freak injury in 2011, appearing in at least 147 games each of the last three seasons, and he didn't hit below .250 in any month of the 2014 campaign. He struggled in the postseason (.558 OPS) and especially in the World Series (4-for-26), but Posey was one of the main reasons why the Giants earned a wild card birth in the first place, and of course San Francisco won it all regardless. Against right-handers, Posey hit .314/.366/.478, up from .283/.362/.431 a year before, and he was red-hot down the stretch in the regular season, finishing with a .978 OPS in the second half. Sure, his walk rate was down more than two percent (from 10.1% to 7.8%), but Posey again improved his strikeout rate (to 11.4%) and has proven to be an extremely consistent offensive contributor. He'll be just 28 at the start of the 2015 campaign and is still the clear choice for first catcher off the board.
47 Jonathan Lucroy (Mil - C)
Healthy
ADP: 47.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 153 585 73 13 69 4 .301
2015 Projections 124 481 56 13 65 5 .291
3 Year Average 132 474 59 14 70 6 .297
Outlook: Lucroy languished in anonymity for a few years, but he became a household name last season after smashing a league-best 53 doubles and finishing fourth in NL MVP voting. His home run and RBI numbers dipped a bit, but he also hit .300 and finished with the most at-bats among all catchers by playing at first base as well, something he figures to do again in 2015. Lucroy isn’t hiding any longer -- he will be among the first catchers taken in fantasy drafts this spring, and rightfully so.
77 Devin Mesoraco (Cin - C)
DTD
ADP: 75.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 114 384 54 25 80 1 .273
2015 Projections 125 479 53 20 68 1 .253
3 Year Average 90 291 34 13 45 1 .247
Outlook: As bad as the Reds' 2014 season, just imagine how it would have been had they not had breakout seasons from Mesoraco and Todd Frazier. Mesoraco's season got off to a false start with an oblique injury, followed by an early hamstring injury, but between those injuries he got off to a sizzling start at the plate that carried through most of the season, though he slumped along with the rest of the team in August and September. Considering he hit .468 in April and no higher than .267 in any other month, it's reasonable to suggest that his batting average will decline in 2015, but Mesoraco's power will still put him among the top 10 catchers if not in the top five.
82 Evan Gattis (Hou - C)
Healthy
ADP: 81.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 108 369 41 22 52 0 .263
2015 Projections 90 357 42 23 55 0 .263
3 Year Average 106 362 42 22 58 0 .254
Outlook: Despite being limited to just 108 games due to a back injury and various illnesses in 2014, Gattis still finished third among catchers in home runs, behind only Devin Mesoraco (25) and former teammate Brian McCann (23). His strikeout rate jumped by three percent (from 21.2% to 24.2%), but his BABIP improved by more than 40 points, resulting in a 20-point increase in batting average. He continued to struggle against breaking balls, as evidenced by his 36.0% whiff rate against such pitches last season, but his overall development at the plate was encouraging. The 28-year-old graded out as one of the worst defensive catchers in the majors, however, and an offseason trade to Houston only further increased the expectation that Gattis will move to left field in 2015. Of course, Gattis is still catcher eligible in most leagues, and he may continue seeing occasional starts behind the plate when the Astros' regular catchers need rest, but his rotisserie value will likely drop off considerably if he loses catcher eligibility in 2016. For this season, he'll benefit from a higher volume of playing time and the opportunity to play half of his games in a much more hitter-friendly home park in Houston. With the flexibility of playing left field and the potential to DH, Gattis could reach the 30-homer plateau for the first time in his career this season.
93 Salvador Perez (KC - C)
Healthy
ADP: 96.2
CHG: +0.1
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 150 578 57 17 70 1 .260
2015 Projections 116 468 48 14 63 0 .286
3 Year Average 121 454 48 14 63 0 .280
Outlook: If nothing else, Perez's steady presence in the lineup makes him a valuable fantasy catcher, as only Jonathan Lucroy played in more games in 2014 -- and Lucroy saw much of that time at first base. The young backstop caught 150 games for manager Ned Yost, and rightfully earned his second straight Gold Glove award. Although he scored more runs (57) and collected more hits (150) than in any of his other major league seasons, each figure of his .260/.289/.403 slash line represented a career low. He chased a career-high 46.2% of pitches outside the strike zone, and as a result, struck out in 14 percent of his at-bats (another career-high). He'll presumably work on his pitch selection this offseason, an area that the 24-year-old has always struggled with a bit, having never posted a walk rate above five percent in any of his MLB season. His youth leaves him with plenty of time to improve his plate discipline, however, so there's enough reason for optimism heading into 2015.
101 Yan Gomes (Cle - C)
Healthy
ADP: 103.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 135 485 61 21 74 0 .278
2015 Projections 133 521 72 21 70 1 .280
3 Year Average 89 292 38 12 42 1 .274
Outlook: Expectations were high for Gomes entering 2014, as he was coming off a strong showing in a limited role in 2013 and had taken over primary catching duties in Cleveland from Carlos Santana. He easily surpassed those expectations by posting impressive numbers in all but one roto category, finishing fourth among catchers in 5x5 rotisserie value, only behind Buster Posey, Jonathan Lucroy and Devin Mesoraco. The 27-year-old played plus defense and was outstanding down the stretch, with an .847 OPS, nine homers and 38 RBI after the All-Star break, exceeding his RBI output from the first half in 89 fewer at-bats, en route to being named the Silver Slugger at the position in the AL. Some skepticism is understandable, as Gomes drew just 24 walks last season (4.6% BB%) while striking out at a 23.2% clip, and he still swings at too many pitches out of the zone, but the power is real and the Indians figure to continue relying on him as a key run producer, likely batting him fifth or sixth in the order.
104 Yadier Molina (StL - C)
Healthy
ADP: 101.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 110 404 40 7 38 1 .282
2015 Projections 125 492 53 11 57 5 .276
3 Year Average 128 471 58 14 65 5 .308
Outlook: Having been arguably the most reliable catcher over the last near-decade, it was only a matter of time before injuries caught up with Molina. Sure enough, he was limited to just 110 games in 2014 largely due to a thumb injury, his lowest number since his rookie year in 2004. Molina still managed decent numbers, posting a .282/.337/.420 line, but his extremely-low flyball rate of 26.6% (over six percent off his career rate) led to a dip in his power numbers with Molina collecting an XBH in just 6.9% of his at-bats, far below the 10.5% rate he had over his prior two seasons. While he may not be quite the player he has been, he should be fully healthy and rested heading into 2015 and is a very good bet to be a top-five catcher again on an improved Cardinals team.
131 Brian McCann (NYY - C)
Healthy
ADP: 128.0
CHG: +0.1
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 140 495 57 23 75 0 .232
2015 Projections 109 421 43 18 55 1 .226
3 Year Average 121 430 48 21 66 1 .237
Outlook: Jumping to the American League after eight seasons with the Braves, McCann saw his on-base percentage plummet to .286 in his first season in the Bronx, more than 60 points below his mark of .350 in the NL. His walk rate fell by close to four percent from 2013 (9.7% to 5.9%) and the increased deployment of defensive shifts hurt McCann significantly, as his BABIP fell to .231, more than 50 points below his career average (.283). Fortunately for fantasy owners, the power numbers were still there, as McCann hit 23 homers, second-most among catchers only behind Devin Mesoraco, with 75 RBI, his highest total since 2010. The seven-time All-Star also gained some experience at first base, logging his first 16 career appearances at the position, perhaps giving him duel eligiblity in some leagues. Even with just catcher eligibility, McCann is still plenty valuable, and while the shift may keep his average relatively low, he had a lot more success against lefties in 2014 (.292/.324/.526) and the power and RBI production should keep him among the top 10 fantasy contributors at the position.
141 Russell Martin (Tor - C)
Healthy
ADP: 158.0
CHG: +0.1
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 111 379 45 11 67 4 .290
2015 Projections 115 425 48 16 55 6 .247
3 Year Average 124 413 49 16 58 6 .240
Outlook: With free agency looming, Martin picked a pretty good time to slash .290/.402/.430 with 11 home runs and 67 RBI. He also threw out 39 percent of baserunners (37 of 96), setting himself up for a monster payday, which he received from Toronto (five years, $82 million). Since pitch-framing isn't a category, the catcher's fantasy value doesn't reflect his true baseball value. Considering that Martin hadn't hit higher than .250 since 2007 before last season, there's reason to expect a downturn to his overall numbers in 2015. Throw into the mix that he started 106 games behind the plate in 2014, his second-lowest figure in nine seasons. Martin will be out to prove that 2014 wasn't a fluke, but fantasy owners may want to temper their enthusiasm for a 32-year-old catcher with a history of knee and shoulder problems.
146 Wilin Rosario (Col - C)
Healthy
ADP: 161.8
CHG: +0.2
Depth: 1B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 106 382 46 13 54 1 .267
2015 Projections 105 424 58 20 65 2 .267
3 Year Average 115 409 59 21 68 3 .276
Outlook: Though defensive deficiencies have long plagued Rosario, the Rockies have exercised patience in developing him as a catcher because of his game-changing power. Rosario appeared set to blossom into a premier fantasy asset at his position after swatting 28 homers in fewer than 400 at-bats as a rookie in 2012, but he’s since backslid offensively while showing limited progress behind the plate, casting doubt on how long he may remain a catcher -- or even with the Rockies. A nagging hand injury and a severe case of the flu last season bears some blame for his decline in slugging, and if not for a mostly meaningless hot streak in the final two weeks, his .267 batting average and .305 OBP would have been less palatable. It’s conceivable that the 26-year-old could still refine his receiving skills and limit his vulnerabilities as a hitter against breaking pitches, but his leash will be much shorter this time around. If the Rockies don’t deal Rosario before spring training, he’ll likely be forced to battle for the starting catching job with Nick Hundley and Michael McKenry.
157 Matt Wieters (Bal - C)
DTD
ADP: 184.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 26 104 13 5 18 0 .308
2015 Projections 99 380 46 16 52 1 .253
3 Year Average 106 384 46 17 60 2 .247
Outlook: What began as a bit of forearm soreness for Wieters in April turned into a serious elbow concern in early May, but an initial visit to the renowned Dr. James Andrews yielded good news, as surgery was not recommended at that time. However, as Wieters continued to play (exclusively at DH) and the elbow worsened, the decision was made to shut him down. Treatment and rehabilitation failed to resolve the issue in the month that followed, with Wieters' attempts to start up with throwing halted by renewed discomfort in the region, and the 28-year-old was ultimately forced to undergo Tommy John surgery on June 17. The expectation is that Wieters will be a go for spring training, and while the sample size from 2014 is small, the elbow issue didn't sap his power (career-high .192 ISO) and his contact (84.6%) and swinging-strike rates (7.7%) both improved. He did benefit from a .329 BABIP, so the .305 average should be taken with a grain of salt, but Wieters is a proven home-run commodity and will make for a strong bounce-back candidate, assuming the elbow holds up during Grapefruit League play.
170 Wilson Ramos (Was - C)
Healthy
ADP: 191.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 88 341 32 11 47 0 .267
2015 Projections 136 546 51 21 83 0 .262
3 Year Average 64 237 24 10 39 0 .270
Outlook: Ramos just can't seem to stay in one piece, as an early-season hamstring strain and broken hamate bone limited him to just 88 games in 2014. While that's an improvement on the year before, it's still not the kind of track record you want to see in someone playing a physically-demanding position like catcher. When he's actually on the field, Ramos continues to supply solid power numbers at the plate and above-average defense behind it, and his August performance (six home runs in 87 at-bats and a .241 ISO) certainly provides more hope that a healthy Ramos will be a very productive Ramos. However, there's little evidence to suggest that he can actually stay healthy for more than a couple of months at a stretch. He's a good upside play if you can get him at a reduced price due to the injuries, but don't pay full retail for that upside.
172 Travis d'Arnaud (NYM - C)
Healthy
ADP: 202.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 108 385 48 13 41 1 .242
2015 Projections 139 540 56 14 45 1 .224
3 Year Average 70 242 26 7 23 0 .231
Outlook: D'Arnaud's 2013 struggles lingered into 2014, with the former first-round pick batting just .178/.213/.311 with six extra-base hits (three homers) over the first two months of the season, while he lost time to a concussion. The decision was made in early June to send him for a tune up at Triple-A Las Vegas. Simply put, d'Arnaud was a different player upon his return. He smashed a three-run homer in his first game back and from June 24 on, d'Arnaud hit .272 (70-for-257) with 19 doubles, 10 homers and 32 RBI. D'Arnaud also shortened his swing and trimmed his strikeout rate by close to six percent in the second half (from 18.1% to 12.3%), giving hope to a Mets team that plans on competing in 2015 that he might be on the verge of a full-fledged breakout at the dish. Fantasy owners will obviously be hoping for the same, but without a longer track record of success at the major league level, d'Arnaud will likely remain a fringe starter in most mixed fantasy leagues, at least at the start of the season. He underwent surgery to remove bone chips from his elbow but is expected to be fine for Opening Day.
199 Yasmani Grandal (LAD - C, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 210.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 128 377 47 15 49 3 .225
2015 Projections 119 429 55 14 54 1 .238
3 Year Average 72 219 29 8 31 1 .247
Outlook: Strife characterized Grandal’s 2013 season, which was abbreviated due to a 50-game suspension to start the year and concluded with a gruesome ACL tear in July. While the injury legitimately threatened his Opening Night availability last season, he bucked all expectations and landed on the 25-man roster, making his first appearance behind the dish in the second game. As a precaution, the Padres carried three catchers well into May, but with no indication of a setback to Grandal’s right knee, Nick Hundley was dealt to the Orioles on May 24. The move provided Grandal and Rene Rivera with an equal share of the nods, but as the season wound on, the former garnered sporadic starts at first base due to Yonder Alonso’s season-ending forearm injury and to ease stress on Grandal’s surgically-repaired knee. Ultimately, Grandal worked his way into a near everyday role at first, which coincided with the end of his season-long battle with the Mendoza Line. Entering Aug. 24 with a miserable .204/.302/.376 line, he thereafter displayed his prowess at the plate, batting .283 with five home runs, 21 RBI, 19 runs scored, and a 20:35 BB:K in 130 at-bats. Traded to the Dodgers as part of the Matt Kemp deal in December, Grandal should benefit from having a more talented lineup around him in Los Angeles. Look for him to take over as the team's primary catcher.
209 Miguel Montero (ChC - C)
Healthy
ADP: 214.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 136 489 40 13 72 0 .243
2015 Projections 129 477 48 12 64 0 .243
3 Year Average 131 463 50 13 67 0 .255
Outlook: Montero was showing some encouraging signs early on, striking out at just a 8.4% clip and drawing 14 walks in March and April. Regression was expected and indeed occurred, but it took longer than many expected for the production to tail off. Montero went into the All-Star break with 11 homers and 52 RBI, matching his 2013 output in the former and exceeding his output in the latter, while hitting at a .262 clip. Hopefully you sold high. Montero hit just .212 with two homers and eight runs scored in 208 second-half trips, but he did cut down his strikeouts significantly last season and his BABIP was more than 40 points below his career mark of .306. While the final numbers don't look awful, with Montero finishing fifth among catchers in RBI, the per-game production was disappointing and he may see fewer RBI opportunities in 2015 while perhaps batting lower in the batting order with the Cubs.
212 Derek Norris (SD - C)
Healthy
ADP: 220.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 127 385 46 10 55 2 .270
2015 Projections 76 284 36 8 38 3 .254
3 Year Average 95 286 35 9 40 4 .245
Outlook: Norris had a very solid 2014 campaign, upping his batting average from .246 to .270 while also contributing 10 homers. He appeared to tire down the stretch and it is possible that his heavy workload behind the plate down the stretch, necessitated by injuries to other Oakland backstops, affected him as the season went on. After earning an All-Star bid with an exceptional .874 OPS and eight homers in the first half, Norris only managed two homers after the break, with a .659 OPS over his final 188 at-bats. Following a December trade to the Padres, Norris is in line to take on a true starter role next season, though his power numbers may take a hit and it's fair to wonder how he'll hold up to a full year of everyday duty.
225 Mike Zunino (Sea - C)
Healthy
ADP: 216.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 131 438 51 22 60 0 .199
2015 Projections 127 491 58 19 52 0 .193
3 Year Average 92 306 36 14 37 0 .203
Outlook: Zunino set a franchise record for home runs by a catcher last season, but it came with a .199 average, the lowest in the majors among catchers with at least 300 at-bats. More than half (44) of Zunino's 87 hits went for extra bases. Yes, Zunino can jump on a major league fastball. It's on breaking and offspeed pitches where his at-bats go to die. Zunino struck out in a third of his plate appearances last season while walking just 3.6% of the time. But he's just 24 and is still developing after being rushed to the big leagues with only 419 minor league plate appearances under his belt. The Mariners like the way he handles the pitching staff, and there is no one around to challenge him for playing time.
230 John Jaso (TB - C, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 221.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: DH-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 99 307 42 9 40 2 .264
2015 Projections 36 88 12 2 11 1 .273
3 Year Average 92 269 38 7 37 3 .271
Outlook: For the second straight season, Jaso's campaign ended early due to concussions. Jaso was having a decent 2014, even showing a bit of pop with nine homers in 307 at-bats. One concerning aspect of his season was his usually excellent OBP (.394 in 2012 and .387 in 2013) fell down to .337 in 2014, as his walk rate was cut almost in half from over 15.0% in 2012 and 2013 to 8.1%. His power increase enabled him to put up a .767 OPS in 2014, a very solid number for a catcher. The issue for big league teams is figuring out what to do with Jaso position-wise with the growing concussion issues. While he is a great hitter for a catcher, he is a very poor defensive catcher, and he graded out among the worst defenders behind the plate last season. Assuming health, Jaso will be in the lineup against righties, but it might be at first base or at DH following a January trade back to Tampa Bay, a move that will help to keep him healthy and make him a sneaky second catcher in two-catcher leagues as he will still have catcher eligibility.
256 Jason Castro (Hou - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 126 465 43 14 56 1 .222
2015 Projections 103 388 47 14 47 1 .271
3 Year Average 111 386 45 13 47 1 .249
Outlook: Drafted as a consensus top-12 catcher, Castro hit a disappointing .222/.286/.366 with 14 home runs and 56 RBI to finish 2014 ranked 21st at the position. That made him a starter in most two-catcher leagues, but Castro's modest power (.156 career ISO), weak on-base skills (.316 OBP) and struggles against lefties (.201 BAA) make him a fringe option even in those formats. Perhaps the only impressive detail about his 2014 campaign was the fact he avoided the disabled list, but chronic right knee issues plagued him in every season prior and he continues to play the most physically demanding position on the field. The offseason acquisition of Hank Conger from the Angels puts Castro's long-term future with the Astros in doubt, but he'll likely compete with Conger in an ongoing battle for playing time if the duo remains intact through the end of spring training.
263 Jarrod Saltalamacchia (Mia - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 114 373 43 11 44 0 .220
2015 Projections 109 417 56 16 52 1 .233
3 Year Average 119 401 55 17 56 1 .239
Outlook: Saltalamacchia came out of the gates on fire in his debut season with Miami, batting .310/.416/.595 during his first 27 games. He cooled significantly after that red-hot opening month, however, and ended the year with a disappointing .220/.320/.362 line over 373 at-bats with 43 runs scored, 11 home runs and 44 RBI in his age-29 campaign. Salty’s power numbers dipped significantly from his final season in Boston, as he tallied just 31 extra-base hits a year after racking up 14 home runs and 40 doubles. Saltalamacchia did manage a career-best 12.3 BB% last season, but the Marlins are looking for a bit more punch from a player who averaged 18 home runs and 27 doubles in 115 games from 2011-2013.
275 Tyler Flowers (CWS - C)
Healthy
ADP: 222.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 127 407 42 15 50 0 .241
2015 Projections 70 275 32 12 30 0 .240
3 Year Average 88 266 28 11 29 1 .222
Outlook: Flowers got his longest look as the White Sox's starting catcher in 2014, setting career highs in games played, hits, home runs, and strikeouts. His batting average rose nearly 50 points after hitting .195 in 2013, but his .241 batting average marked a career-best, and it was also buttressed by an unsustainable .355 BABIP. Additionally, he continues to strike out too frequently -- his 36.0% strikeout rate in 2014 was the worst among all batters with at least 400 plate appearances. However, he can hit for some power, which should make him somewhat useful assuming the White Sox do not bring in another viable catcher during the offseason.
278 Carlos Ruiz (Phi - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 110 381 43 6 31 4 .252
2015 Projections 90 342 41 7 37 3 .272
3 Year Average 105 354 43 9 45 3 .282
Outlook: Ruiz played in 110 games for the Phillies in 2014, posting a batting line of .252/.347/.717 with six home runs. He missed a significant chunk of time in July with a concussion and also underwent a minor arthroscopic procedure on his left shoulder after the season. Ruiz has a good eye at the plate and makes good contact, which allows him to hit for a decent average. He will also pop the occasional home run, though hitting double-digits is highly unlikely at this stage of his career. Ruiz will be 36 years old this season and the Phillies may opt to rest him a bit more to keep him fresh.
284 Kurt Suzuki (Min - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 131 452 37 3 61 0 .288
2015 Projections 96 376 31 4 41 1 .253
3 Year Average 114 382 33 5 45 1 .254
Outlook: Suzuki had a surprising resurgence at the plate that resulted in a two-year contract extension as the team's everyday catcher with Joe Mauer moving to first base. Suzuki originally signed a one-year deal with many thinking he'd serve as a veteran bridge to young catcher Josmil Pinto. However, Pinto was sent to Triple-A early in the season and Suzuki got hot at the plate by hitting .309/.365/.396 in the first half of the season. Rather than trade a player hitting above his recent career marks, the Twins believed in his revitalization and cited a need for a veteran catcher with many younger pitchers on the staff by giving him the extension in July. It's not clear it was a wise decision, as Suzuki hit just .253/.313/.362 after the All Star break. His .728 OPS isn't unprecedented as he had similar offense performances six years ago, but his hot hitting was likely fueled by a career-high .315 BABIP. While Suzuki's defense drew raves from the Twins, he looked below average by advanced defensive metrics and his pitch-framing stats were poor. Suzuki does make good contact with few strikeouts, but don't count on a continued career resurgence at the dish.
315 Josh Phegley (Oak - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 11 37 4 3 7 0 .216
2015 Projections 44 120 8 3 13 1 .208
3 Year Average 38 120 9 4 14 1 .208
Outlook: After earning an extended look with the big club in 2013, Phegley spent much of 2014 at Triple-A Charlotte. He displayed 20-plus home run power for the second straight year, but did not earn a call up to the major leagues until September. Phegley enters 2015 as A's likely No. 2 option following a November trade from the White Sox, though he could find himself in the starting role following a flurry of trade in Oakland.
322 Chris Iannetta (LAA - C)
Healthy
ADP: 221.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 108 306 41 7 43 3 .252
2015 Projections 83 301 34 8 34 1 .233
3 Year Average 101 284 36 9 36 1 .239
Outlook: Iannetta may have had his best season in an Angels uniform in 2014, as his .373 on-base percentage was his best mark since he was a member of the Rockies in 2008. His peripherals were similar to his 2013 numbers, with the one standout being his BABIP, which stood at a career-best .329. The veteran once again split time at catcher with Hank Conger last season, but that tradition will break in 2015, as Conger was traded to the Astros in November. While this may lead one to believe that Iannetta will see more than the 108 games he played behind the plate last season, general manager Jerry Dipoto has suggested that he'll remain in the 110-115 game range. Iannetta will likely continue to combine moderate pop with excellent plate discipline in 2015, but unless he begins to see more games behind the dish, his value will be limited.
1 2 3 4 5
of
7
a d v e r t i s e m e n t