Pre-Draft Player Rankings

101 Shelby Miller (Atl - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 106.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-3
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 15 9 0 173.3 169 3.06 1.21
2014 Projections 11 3 0 96.0 102 2.34 1.02
3 Year Average 8 4 0 93.3 92 2.89 1.18
Outlook: Miller started the season on fire as one of baseball's best pitchers over the first few months of 2013. Even after cooling a bit in the second half, Miller finished the season with excellent numbers, striking out 169 batters in 173.1 innings and carrying a 3.06 ERA. He struggled with walks at times, but at age-23, he's still capable of ironing out those issues. Miller's mysterious disappearing act during the playoffs led many to speculate that the young flame-thrower might be traded during the offseason, but Miller remains with the team heading into the spring and projects to be a mid-rotation starter for the Cards in 2014.
102 Billy Butler (Oak - DH, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 156.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 162 582 62 15 82 0 .289
2014 Projections 162 619 67 20 84 1 .283
3 Year Average 161 598 69 21 95 1 .298
Outlook: With expectations riding high after a breakout season in 2012, Butler disappointed his owners last year with a failed encore performance. He maintained his typically strong plate discipline, and even posted higher contact rates, but with an increase in groundballs that came at the expense of his flyball rate, his power suffered, and he hit just 15 home runs. The rest of his game, however, remained largely unchanged, as he still hit .289 and had 82 RBI in a season in which most of the Royals' hitters struggled at the plate. He even increased his walk rate and cut down on his strikeouts, which helped to maintain an impressive .374 on-base percentage. While a return of at least some of the power would make drafting Country Breakfast a little more appetizing in 2014, he still remains a fantastic option in the corner infield with even more value in leagues that count OBP instead of average.
103 Curtis Granderson (NYM - CF, LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 129.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 61 214 31 7 15 8 .229
2014 Projections 127 467 88 31 76 14 .246
3 Year Average 126 464 90 30 80 14 .244
Outlook: Granderson had an amazingly star-crossed year in 2013, missing half the season with a forearm injury sustained when he was hit by a pitch in spring training, then breaking a finger when he was again hit by a pitch just eight games after his return. The Mets signed Granderson to a four-year, $60 million deal in December, a change that removes the short-porch in right field that Granderson enjoyed during his time playing half of his games at Yankee Stadium. A heavy pull hitter, Granderson's low average in 2012 and 2013 may be indicative of things to come thanks to the defensive shifts that opposing teams utilize against him, but with health, a return to the 25-30 homer range in the heart of the Mets' order seems reachable.
104 Starlin Castro (ChC - SS)
Healthy
ADP: 129.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 161 666 59 10 44 9 .245
2014 Projections 162 660 74 11 58 17 .274
3 Year Average 160 662 76 11 63 19 .278
Outlook: Castro led the National League with 666 at-bats last year, and the rest of his numbers were just as evil. Despite reaching base more than 200 times, he tallied only 59 runs and 44 RBI – abysmal totals relative to the high workload. The 30:129 BB:K ratio is unacceptable for any hitter, but it's even more egregious when you consider that Castro is supposed to be one of the offensive leaders of the team and that he only hit 10 home runs. He turns 24 right before the beginning of the season, so he is still young enough to turn it around – he certainly has the talent to do so – but if he doesn't make huge strides in 2014 it may be time to put the “bust” label on him for good and give his starting job to uber-prospect Javier Baez.
105 Koji Uehara (Bos - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 91.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 4 1 21 74.3 101 1.09 0.57
2014 Projections 5 2 30 54.0 74 1.40 0.63
3 Year Average 2 1 7 58.3 76 1.70 0.63
Outlook: Uehara was Boston's regular-season MVP after stabilizing the closer job in June. He saved 21 games, was dominant against both righties and lefties and struck out a ridiculous 12.2 batters per nine innings. The plan in spring training was to avoid using him on back-to-back days because of a 2012 shoulder injury, which delayed the decision to give him a shot at closing, but he countered that by being an efficient strike-thrower and generally avoiding big pitch counts in his appearances. Uehara threw more innings last season than he has in any big league campaign, and it remains to be seen if that workload affects him at all in 2014, which is in part the reason Boston signed former Cardinals closer Edward Mujica. However, coming off his dominant 2013 campaign, Uehara will open this season as Boston's closer.
106 Brian McCann (NYY - C, 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 98.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 102 356 43 20 57 0 .256
2014 Projections 115 442 48 22 65 2 .253
3 Year Average 117 420 46 21 65 2 .252
Outlook: Upon his return from offseason shoulder surgery in early May, McCann was blazing hot, with six home runs in his first 16 games. He had 12 homers by the All-Star break despite missing the first 30 games, but fizzled after the intermission, slashing just .220/.296/.384 over his final 177 at-bats. Still, McCann finished with 20 home runs, marking his sixth consecutive season reaching that number. McCann's 9.7 percent walk rate was in line with his career average (9.5 percent), but his strikeout rate jumped back up to 16.4 percent, up from 12.5 percent in 2012. At this point, the baseball world knows who McCann is; a powerful, pull-hitting, veteran backstop with above-average on-base skills, and the Yankees shelled out $85 million to acquire his services in the offseason. It's a perfect fit for both the Yankees, who relied on the likes of Francisco Cervelli and Chris Stewart last season, and McCann, as the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium should keep the power numbers coming. Further, he'll have the flexibility to work as a DH on days where the Yankees want to give him a respite from catching.
107 Salvador Perez (KC - C)
Healthy
ADP: 125.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 138 496 48 13 79 0 .292
2014 Projections 78 317 37 9 44 0 .309
3 Year Average 84 311 35 9 46 0 .302
Outlook: After an incredibly strong finish to the 2012 season, expectations for Perez ran very high heading into the 2013 season. He was always known to be a high-average hitter with strong contact rates but he also displayed a strong power surge that many thought would take longer to develop. Unfortunately, that power didn't materialize as expected last season. He ultimately finished the season batting .292 with 13 home runs (.141 ISO) and 79 RBI, numbers more reflective of expectations prior to the 2012 power surge. Perez doesn't walk or strikeout very often, so his on-base totals won't be huge unless he sees a spike in his BABIP. Still, his ability to put bat on ball and hit for a line drive rate above 20-percent, coupled with the fact that he'll hit in the heart of the Royals' lineup, should provide solid, above-average production from behind the plate.
108 Martin Prado (NYY - 3B, 2B, LF)
DTD
ADP: 102.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 155 609 70 14 82 3 .282
2014 Projections 159 624 73 12 68 7 .277
3 Year Average 147 592 72 12 70 8 .282
Outlook: Prado ended up having a nice season in Arizona following the trade that sent Justin Upton to Atlanta. He had a rough first half, but really came on late in the season, hitting .374 in August. There is talk of a positional change for Prado, possibly to make room for Matt Davidson at third, but his multiple position eligibility should remain, making him very valuable. Regardless of how the D-Backs decide to make all of the pieces fit, Prado should see an everyday supply of at-bats again in 2014.
109 Manny Machado (Bal - 3B)
DTD
ADP: 116.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 156 667 88 14 71 6 .283
2014 Projections 108 440 53 10 46 4 .270
3 Year Average 104 429 56 10 48 4 .280
Outlook: It was thought that Machado would take time to mature as a hitter, but instead he hit .310 in the first half and was on pace to break the MLB record for doubles. He's still not a finished product as shown with his 4.1% walk rate, a clear sign that Machado needs to develop more patience at the plate. Machado suffered an ugly knee injury in the final week of the season and needed surgery to repair a torn medial patellar ligament. Although he had the procedure in mid-October and there was no reported damage to his ACL or MCL, Machado is facing a six-month rehab window. As a result, he is in danger of missing Opening Day. Once Machado is ready to take the field again, he will be one of the more attractive options at third base, and over the next few years some of those doubles should begin to turn into home runs as he reaches his power peak.
110 Aaron Hill (Ari - 2B)
DTD
ADP: 130.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 87 327 45 11 41 1 .291
2014 Projections 131 509 69 16 61 13 .283
3 Year Average 127 485 66 15 62 12 .280
Outlook: Despite playing just 87 games because of a pesky hand injury, Hill was effective when he was healthy in 2013. His .291 average and .356 OBP are evidence he is still an elite fantasy option at his position as long the injury bug doesn't bite. Even with the glut of young infielders Arizona has in their system, Hill's contract should guarantee him plenty of playing time going forward, making him a good bounce-back candidate in 2014, although his rebound potential would likely take a slight hit if he's traded away from the hitter-friendly confines of Chase Field to a club looking for a proven veteran to man the keystone.
111 Julio Teheran (Atl - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 115.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 14 8 0 185.7 170 3.20 1.17
2014 Projections 4 4 0 69.0 59 3.69 1.20
3 Year Average 5 3 0 70.7 62 3.44 1.19
Outlook: Teheran struggled mightily at Triple-A Gwinnett in 2012, leading to some second-guessing about his billing as one of the top young pitching prospects in the game. The Braves made Teheran earn the No. 5 starter job last spring, and the right-hander did just that, but he got off to a rough start to the regular season, with a 5.08 ERA in April. Things seemed to click shortly thereafter, as Teheran went on to post outstanding overall numbers as a 22-year-old rookie. While efficiency is an issue -- he made it out of the seventh inning just five times in 30 starts -- Teheran has great command of his pitches (2.2 BB/9) and will likely only get better as he learns how to further handle major league hitters. On the heels of his stellar campaign, Teheran is assured of a rotation spot this time around.
112 Kyle Seager (Sea - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 133.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 160 615 79 22 69 9 .260
2014 Projections 122 471 50 14 52 8 .251
3 Year Average 123 464 54 15 56 8 .259
Outlook: Seager continues to be one of the few positives on the roster and the lone Mariners youngster without major questions dogging him. He proved that 2012 was no fluke by posting remarkably similar stats last year across the board. What's more, he improved his walk rate while his strikeout and contact rates remained strong. Seager played 106 consecutive games at one point, which might have tired him down the stretch, as he slumped in the last six weeks of the season with a .181 average and a .558 OPS. He still finished among the better AL third basemen –- first in steals, fourth in doubles, fifth in homers, fifth in OPS, fifth in ISO. The only place he took a step back was in RBI, with a near 20-run drop thanks to the impotent bats surrounding him in the lineup. After two solid years, it wouldn't surprise if Seager took another step this season.
113 Billy Hamilton (Cin - CF)
Healthy
ADP: 133.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 13 19 9 0 1 13 .368
2014 Projections 120 464 75 9 41 35 .265
3 Year Average 13 19 9 0 1 13 .368
Outlook: True speed demons like Hamilton have among the biggest fantasy swing potentials among all players. Is he going to be like Vince Coleman and dominate a category, or is he going to be more like Dee Gordon and lose playing time and struggle to keep a major league job? Much of Hamilton's value rests in the format of your league. If you play in the NFBC or any other no-trade league, Hamilton is especially tricky to value. A full season of him in the lineup gets you half of the way there in the stolen-base category, if not more. But if you draft him, chances are you are avoiding other elite stolen base guys, as a surplus in the category gets you nowhere, plus you have to draft power-heavy hitters to make up for Hamilton's shortfall there. If Hamilton scuffles and subsequently gets demoted, your team goes from likely winning the category to falling to the back of the pack. Hamilton struck out nearly 20 percent of the time at Triple-A without being a power threat (.343 slugging percentage) - there's a good chance that strikeout rate hits 25 percent or higher at the major league level, which will make it difficult for him to hit for a decent batting average. Be very cautious with Hamilton - the burn potential is high.
114 Matt Moore (TB - SP)
DTD
ADP: 118.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-5
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 17 4 0 150.3 143 3.29 1.30
2014 Projections 8 7 0 114.0 110 3.70 1.32
3 Year Average 10 5 0 112.3 111 3.53 1.32
Outlook: In his second full season as a starter with the Rays, Moore launched forward as one of the top left-handers in the American League. He finished the season with a 17-4 record and a 3.29 ERA and was selected to his first All-Star game. He missed August with soreness in his throwing elbow, but was able to come back strong in September and the postseason. His fastball velocity was lower in 2013, but he still dealt with walk problems and led the major leagues in wild pitches. He has a respectable 8.6 K/9 rate and he locked down when runners were in scoring position, only allowing hitters to manage .200/.299/.282 in that situation. Though it may be difficult to repeat the incredible winning percentage, the 24-year-old Moore will be one of the top starters for the Rays and he will be a player to target on draft day.
115 Jered Weaver (LAA - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 111.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-2
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 11 8 0 154.3 117 3.27 1.14
2014 Projections 15 11 0 200.0 164 2.81 1.05
3 Year Average 16 7 0 193.0 152 2.75 1.05
Outlook: The 2013 season started off on a sour note for Weaver, as a broken left (non-pitching) elbow in early April left him sidelined for seven weeks. Upon his return, however, he picked up where he left off in 2012, as he once again led the Angels' staff with a 3.27 ERA. Weaver may not strikeout batters the way he once did, but he was able to once again limit free passes (2.2 BB/9) and long balls (1.0 HR/9) last season, while stranding baserunners at a 78.5 percent clip. While Weaver's fastball velocity dipped once again in 2013, averaging just 86.5 mph, the veteran righty is an extreme flyball pitcher in one of the biggest ballparks in the game. That, combined with being a control artist, should help him keep his ERA down, even as his other skills continue to erode.
116 Michael Cuddyer (NYM - RF, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 152.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 130 489 74 20 84 10 .331
2014 Projections 111 432 60 18 64 9 .301
3 Year Average 123 459 66 19 71 10 .294
Outlook: Nobody could have forecasted the incredible numbers Cuddyer posted in his age-34 season, as the outfielder improbably took home the NL batting crown with a .331 average while supplying 20 homers and 84 RBI. The counting numbers may have been even more remarkable if an assortment of injuries didn’t limit him to 130 games, but Cuddyer would probably do well to match those totals again even with optimal health. Almost everything about Cuddyer’s 2013 season was baffling, particularly his dramatic reverse splits (.350 vs. RHP, .276 vs. LHP) that deviate wildly from his career marks and raise just as many red flags as his .382 BABIP. In addition, his underlying peripheral marks (8.5 percent walk rate, 18.5 percent strikeout rate, .198 ISO) were otherwise mostly in line with his career marks, suggesting Cuddyer benefited from a good deal of luck in delivering his aberrant performance. Cuddyer should continue to occupy a premium spot in the order behind Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez, but fantasy owners need to avoid paying for last year's numbers.
117 Hyun-jin Ryu (LAD - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 120.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-4
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 14 8 0 192.0 154 3.00 1.20
2014 Projections 14 9 0 199.0 157 3.40 1.20
3 Year Average 14 8 0 192.0 154 3.00 1.20
Outlook: A huge success in his first major league season, Ryu solidified the middle of the Dodgers' rotation, going 14-8 with a 3.00 ERA in 192 innings. With a fastball that sits in the low-90s, Ryu isn't an overpowering guy by any means, but his ratios were solid (7.2 K/9, 2.3 BB/9) and the southpaw has a smooth and easy delivery that would seem to make a repeat appear inevitable. He's a near-lock to start the team's third game of the season, especially since the Dodgers can alternate lefties and righties with Clayton Kershaw, Zack Greinke and Dan Haren locked into the other top-four spots in the rotation.
118 Chase Utley (Phi - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 140.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 131 476 73 18 69 8 .284
2014 Projections 98 366 54 12 47 10 .268
3 Year Average 106 392 58 13 53 11 .268
Outlook: Utley surpassed 450 at-bats last season for the first time since 2009. He managed to avoid missing time because of his degenerative knee condition, but he did miss a few games with an oblique strain. Utley also had a bit of a resurgance at the plate with his highest batting average, home run and RBI totals since 2009, his last season of elite production. He has not returned to an elite level and will not produce at that type of level again now that he is moving into the latter years of his career, but Utley has re-established himself as one of the better fantasy options at second base. Given his recent history, however, it's very difficult to bet on Utley staying healthy for an entire season, and owning him typically requires the acquistion of a well-planned fallback option.
119 Jose Abreu (CWS - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 144.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2014 Projections 118 467 52 18 60 0 .268
3 Year Average 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Outlook: Abreu enters 2014 as one of the bigger mysteries of the season. The newest Cuban superstar to make the trek to MLB is a bit different than the other recent players to defect. He is less athletic than Yasiel Puig and Yoenis Cespedes, and he is also quite a bit older than Puig and a year older than Cespedes was upon his arrival two seasons ago. However, Abreu does come to the states with more alleged raw power. He hit 37 home runs in back-to-back Cuban seasons, and he hit .342/.457/.621 over 799 career games in that league. The scouting reports vary in terms of how those numbers will translate to the big leagues, and some question how he will fare against major league breaking balls. He excelled in the 2013 World Baseball Classic with three home runs and a 1.145 OPS in 25 at-bats. The variance on his projections will likely be great, but he should be projected to start at first and bat somewhere in the middle-third of the White Sox's lineup.
120 Glen Perkins (Min - RP)
DTD
ADP: 117.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 2 0 36 62.7 77 2.30 0.93
2014 Projections 4 4 29 62.0 72 2.92 1.10
3 Year Average 3 2 18 65.0 73 2.49 1.06
Outlook: Perkins proved that his success as a closer in 2012 was no fluke and he's entrenched as Minnesota's stopper and one of the top relief options in the AL. Perkins increased his strikeout rate to 11.1 K/9 while maintaining good control. He's also proven durable by pitching in 60 or more games three seasons in a row after injures plagued him earlier in his career. Although he's left-handed, the Twins haven't been tempted to use him earlier in games against lefty hitters. He made just one appearance last year before the ninth inning. Both last season and for his career, he's actually slightly better against right-handed hitters than left-handed hitters, which has helped him avoid becoming a lefty specialist. While using him earlier in games may be a better use in real baseball terms, using him in only save situations boosts his fantasy value. He should be set for another successful season as Minnesota's closer given his high strikeout rate and usage patterns.
121 Joe Nathan (Det - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 100.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 6 2 43 64.7 73 1.39 0.90
2014 Projections 3 3 25 48.0 53 2.66 1.04
3 Year Average 4 3 31 58.0 65 2.79 1.02
Outlook: Nathan's two-year run as Texas' closer came to an end after he chose not to exercise a contract option for 2014, making him a free agent. Nathan was outstanding again in 2013, allowing just 36 hits and 22 walks in 64.2 innings, fanning 73 and racking up 43 saves. The uptick in walks and elevated strand rate (87.2% LOB mark) don't support the elite 1.39 ERA, but Nathan still misses bats at a very good clip and seems to have enough left in the tank to remain a top-10 closer. The Tigers locked up Nathan with a two-year deal in December, where he'll offer an experienced option to finish out games on a club with World Series aspirations in what might be the final chapter of his career.
122 Michael Wacha (StL - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 115.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-4
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 4 1 0 64.7 65 2.78 1.10
2014 Projections 10 9 0 151.0 133 3.67 1.27
3 Year Average 4 1 0 64.7 65 2.78 1.10
Outlook: Wacha didn't receive a full-time shot in the rotation until September and he quickly locked up a spot in the rotation for 2014 by being nearly unhittable while leading the Cardinals into the playoffs and to the World Series. Wacha made things look very easy at times, nearly throwing a no-hitter, and holding opposing hitters to a .198 batting average against him during his five September starts while striking out 28 across 31.1 innings. The 22-year-old will start 2014 near the top of the Cardinals' rotation, likely as the team's No. 2 or No. 3 starter. His ceiling won't be much higher, but his floor is extremely high for a pitcher his age and he should be a very good starting pitcher for years to come.
123 Francisco Liriano (Pit - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 131.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 16 8 0 161.0 163 3.02 1.22
2014 Projections 9 12 0 152.0 141 4.38 1.41
3 Year Average 10 10 0 150.7 147 4.42 1.39
Outlook: Liriano gave Pittsburgh its biggest free-agent Christmas gift ever when he broke his non-pitching arm playing with his children Christmas Day of 2012. After his injury, the team reworked a $13 million guaranteed two-year deal into a $1 million-plus incentive-based contract which paved the way for the Pirates' first playoff season since 1992. Named the 2013 National League Comeback Player of the Year, Liriano made his season debut in May and never looked back. He finished 16-8, with a 3.02 ERA and 1.22 WHIP in 161 innings. He compiled a 163:63 K:BB ratio, working with four pitches, including a devastating slider and changeup. Liriano won eight of nine home decisions and posted a 1.47 ERA and 0.96 WHIP in 72.2 frames. The lefty did throw up warning flags, compiling a 5.14 ERA and 1.39 WHIP in September. Liriano has never put together strong back-to-back campaigns, but it looks like he's on track to do so in 2014.
124 Austin Jackson (Sea - CF)
Healthy
ADP: 165.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 129 552 99 12 49 8 .272
2014 Projections 145 555 92 12 50 13 .270
3 Year Average 140 562 97 13 53 14 .272
Outlook: After taking an apparent leap in 2012, Jackson took a step back last year. As expected, his .374 BABIP dropped to a more sustainable .336 mark, which led to a drop in batting average from .300 to .278. Jackson also saw a dip in power, clearing the fence just 12 times. But the most disappointing aspect of Jackson’s 2013 campaign was his career-low total of eight steals. A couple of minor lower-body ailments, and an ex-Tigers manager's general reluctance to run likely played a factor into Jackson’s limited action on the basepaths. He still has plenty of speed, though, and with a new manager (Brad Ausmus) at the helm in Detroit, Jackson could be given more freedom to run. Even if given the green light, Jackson will have to improve his plate discipline and start getting on base more. While he has made strides at the plate the past couple years, Jackson remains far too strikeout prone (0.40 BB/K) for a leadoff hitter, which could lead to a drop in the batting order in 2014. If Jackson does get moved out of the leadoff spot, he will likely score fewer runs – easily his best category since cracking the Tigers' lineup. Still, at 27, Jackson is just now entering his prime. He remains a stellar defensive player for the Tigers and has flashed potential for better production at the plate and on the bases. His down campaign in 2013 will lead to less hype heading into draft season, but there’s still plenty of upside here to target Jackson as a breakout candidate once again in 2014.
125 Aroldis Chapman (Cin - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 79.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2013 Season 4 5 38 63.7 112 2.54 1.04
2014 Projections 6 3 37 62.0 103 2.23 1.05
3 Year Average 4 4 26 61.7 102 2.48 1.02
Outlook: For the second offseason in a row, Chapman's role hasn't yet been determined. For manager Dusty Baker was the primary impediment to the plan to move Chapman to the starting rotation (though Chapman himself didn't seem to be sold on the idea -- whether he was always uncertain or whether Baker pushed him in that direction is up for debate), and now that Bryan Price has taken over as the manager, that door remains open. One thing seems likely -- even if Chapman closes, his usage won't be as rigid as it was last season, when often it was "save situation or bust" -- the Reds lost six extra-innings games where Chapman never got into the game. When he got on the mound, Chapman had a few hiccups but was typically dominant again, carrying a 15.8 K/9. His walk rate and home-run rate both trickled upward, and on occasion he struggled with his secondary offerings.
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