Pre-Draft Player Rankings

281 Chris Johnson (Atl - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 153 582 43 10 58 6 .263
2015 Projections 129 521 45 11 61 3 .276
3 Year Average 144 528 48 12 67 4 .288
Outlook: Former Braves general manager Frank Wren handed Johnson a three-year, $23.5 million extension in early May, which seemed to ease the third baseman's mind following a dismal month of April (.583 OPS). He hit .301 over the next two months, but Johnson, the runner-up for the NL batting title in 2013, finished with just a .263/.292/.361 line last season. Johnson's walk rate plummeted to a career-low 3.8%, while his strikeout rate jumped to 26.0%, from 21.2% in 2013. His ISO fell by close to 40 points and his wOBA dropped by nearly 70 (from .354 to .289), as Johnson embodied the Braves' regression as a whole. Given his contract, it seems likely Johnson will continue in an everyday role at third base for Atlanta, but his lack of plus power and fluctuating average take him out of the conversation in most mixed formats, and he'll make for a low-end option in NL-only leagues, while likely batting near the bottom of the order.
292 Mike Moustakas (KC - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 220.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 140 457 45 15 54 1 .212
2015 Projections 131 512 51 15 53 2 .223
3 Year Average 142 497 52 16 56 3 .229
Outlook: Moustakas slashed a miserable .212/.271/.361 in 2014, mostly due to his inability to hit left-handed pitching. He had a .554 OPS against southpaws, and collected just eight extra-base hits on them all year. The third baseman struggled immensely early in the year, and a .627 first-half OPS eventually led to a brief demotion to Triple-A Omaha. He returned to the team when Danny Valencia hit the DL with a hand injury, and the Royals confirmed their faith in Moustakas when they shipped Valencia to Toronto in a late-season deal. Despite the slow start, the 26-year-old finished the year strong, connecting for five long balls in the postseason (compared to 15 total during regular-season play). There are other reasons for optimism heading into 2015, as he posted a three-year low in strikeout rate (14.8 percent), and a career-low .220 BABIP suggests some bad luck came into play as well. Moustakas appears to be in line to begin the season as the starting third baseman, but if he hits another prolonged slump, prospect Christian Colon may begin to threaten his playing time.
293 Conor Gillaspie (CWS - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 222.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 130 464 50 7 57 0 .282
2015 Projections 140 547 57 12 56 0 .263
3 Year Average 90 297 33 7 33 0 .263
Outlook: Gillaspie surprisingly won a piece of the White Sox's starting third base job out of camp. Even more surprisingly, he led team with a .326 batting average at the All-Star break. That average tumbled to around .280 by the end of the year, but he showed a more disciplined approach at the plate, choosing to forego power and instead just put the ball in play. He should enter camp as the favorite for the third base job, but will have to fend off some of the younger players coming through the system.
297 Matt Dominguez (Hou - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 222.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 157 564 51 16 57 0 .215
2015 Projections 102 408 39 13 43 0 .225
3 Year Average 113 405 40 14 50 0 .232
Outlook: In his second full season as the Astros' starting third baseman, Dominguez set a new career high with 157 games played, but his breakout 2013 campaign became a distant memory given his struggles at the plate last season. The 25-year-old put up disappointing numbers across the board, with a .215/.256/.330 slash line, 16 homers and 57 RBI in 564 at-bats. His walk rate (4.8%) dipped slightly while his strikeouts (20.6%) increased by over four percent. Dominguez offered most of his value on defense, ranking second in the AL among qualified third basemen in fielding percentage (.972). He'll open 2015 without much competition to his starting role, mainly due to his glove, but the midseason acquisition of Colin Moran puts Dominguez's long-term hold on the starting job in doubt.
299 Luis Valbuena (Hou - 3B, 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 149 478 68 16 51 1 .249
2015 Projections 95 356 40 10 38 0 .236
3 Year Average 116 358 43 11 39 1 .232
Outlook: Valbuena was quietly one of the most valuable players on the Cubs in 2014, hitting 16 home runs and drawing 65 walks, all while playing two valuable infield positions. Traded to Houston in January, a similar role in 2015 seems likely, but the long-term future for Valbuena remains uncertain. He'll qualify at third base and second base in most leagues in 2015, but with uber-prospect Carlos Correa moving through the Astros' system, it would hardly be surprising to see Valbuena on the move again before Opening Day of 2016 as he seems to be a viable placeholder for rebuilding clubs.
301 Alberto Callaspo (Atl - 2B, 1B, 3B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 221.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 127 404 37 4 39 0 .223
2015 Projections 120 456 49 8 48 1 .248
3 Year Average 134 438 48 8 50 1 .244
Outlook: Callaspo was terrible in 2014, culminating with a second half where he hit .197 with a brutal .495 OPS over his final 122 at-bats. The season was easily the worst of Callaspo's career, after years of being a serviceable utility man with a decent batting average and an OPS north of .700. While he offers versatility around the infield and the ability to switch hit, Callaspo's defense has graded out poorly in back-to-back seasons, and his inability to hit lefties (.196/.268/.250) significantly lowered his value. He'll turn 32 in April, and the days of a guaranteed major league playing time are nearing an end. The Braves signed him to a one-year deal in December, which should install Callaspo as the team's primary second baseman until top prospect Jose Peraza is ready to take over the job.
306 David Freese (LAA - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 134 462 53 10 55 1 .260
2015 Projections 124 473 60 12 62 1 .268
3 Year Average 139 475 59 13 65 2 .272
Outlook: Freese's first season as a member of the Angels ended in disappointment, as the 31-year-old posted the lowest .OPS of his career (.704) in 134 games. While his batted-ball profile showed a career-best mark for line drive percentage, as well as a decrease in groundballs, his strikeout rate continued to climb, settling at a career-high 24.3%. He also walked just 38 times in 462 at-bats, carrying his lowest walk rate (7.4%) since 2011. Despite his unflattering overall numbers, Freese managed to salvage September, as he sported a .315/.367/.562 line with just nine punchouts in 73 at-bats. Freese will almost certainly begin the 2015 season at the hot corner, but Gordon Beckham saw a few starts at third base before he turned it on in the final month, so it's not inconceivable that he could find himself playing for his job at some point if he can't get his strikeout numbers under control.
308 Kris Bryant (ChC - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 166.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2015 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Outlook: We knew this guy was good, but Bryant's power as a 23-year-old third baseman makes him the top prospect in all of baseball. Bryant destroyed the Southern League in half a season with Double-A Tennessee, and he didn't slow down when he was promoted to Triple-A Iowa. While he struck out a lot - a combined 162 times in 2014 - he also drew 43 walks apiece in his two stops. He doesn't have much left to prove in the minors, so expect him to win a spot at the hot corner for the Cubs this year. It may not happen on Opening Day, however, as the Cubs stand to benefit from having Bryant spend a few weeks at Triple-A Iowa to prevent him from accruing a full year of service time in 2015.
314 Gordon Beckham (CWS - 2B, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 127 446 53 9 44 3 .226
2015 Projections 49 126 14 2 11 1 .238
3 Year Average 127 447 54 10 43 4 .242
Outlook: Beckham was traded to the Halos in the midst of yet another disappointing season, as he tallied a .598 OPS in .390 at-bats with the White Sox prior to the deal in August. His bat came alive in limited time with the Angels, as he notched a .268/.328/.429 line with two home runs in 29 games. Beckham primarily saw time in the infield as a backup last season, but he was able to steal time from David Freese when the third baseman was mired in an 0-for-20 skid that carried into September. While waiver wire hunters will always be checking for signs that the 28-year-old is finally realizing his potential, Beckham figures to serve merely on the short end of a platoon at third base with Conor Gillaspie to start the season after returning to the White Sox on a one-year deal.
318 Jake Lamb (Ari - 3B)
DL15
ADP: 221.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 37 126 15 4 11 1 .230
2015 Projections 44 116 13 3 9 0 .224
3 Year Average 37 126 15 4 11 1 .230
Outlook: After slashing .318/.399/.551 in 103 games at Double-A Mobile, Lamb earned a promotion to Triple-A, and a week later received another promotion to join the big league club. As a 23-year-old, he was given the opportunity to act as Arizona’s primary third baseman over the final two months of the season. His approach at the plate fell off completely after the promotion, walking at just a 4.5% clip over 133 plate appearances -- a far cry from the 13.6% rate he posted in 743 plate appearances in the minors over the past two seasons. The biggest thing working in Lamb’s favor is the dearth of quality third-base options in Arizona. Yasmani Tomas will get the first crack at the starting job but Lamb will be next in line.
342 Mark Reynolds (StL - 1B, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 130 378 47 22 45 5 .196
2015 Projections 113 428 46 18 50 2 .194
3 Year Average 133 427 56 22 60 3 .213
Outlook: Reynolds returned to the National League last season for the first time since 2010, and he had trouble with the new hurlers, hitting a career-low .196. Despite the low average, he still topped the 20 home run plateau for the seventh straight season and played surprisingly good defense at both first base and third base. Reynolds' poor plate discipline could ultimately limit his playing time, but he'll provide a right-handed complement to Matt Adams at first base and Matt Carpenter at the hot corner after signing with St. Louis.
366 Eduardo Escobar (Min - SS, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 133 433 52 6 37 1 .275
2015 Projections 130 518 61 6 36 2 .243
3 Year Average 83 243 31 3 19 1 .255
Outlook: Escobar had a surprising breakout season in 2014 and took over the everyday shortstop job for the Twins, but his position for 2015 is unclear. He had shown little at the plate in his career with a .587 OPS in the majors before last year and a just a .675 OPS in the minors. But given a shot at the starting shortstop job in May, Escobar responded by hitting .275/.315/.406 and showing league average defense at shortstop. He didn't add much else for fantasy purposes as he had just six home runs and one stolen base. It's possible he could move to third base in 2015 as the Twins have talked about moving Danny Santana from center field to shortstop. While he'll likely begin the season with a starting job, he may not be able to duplicate his success at the plate given his career track record, a weak walk rate (5.2%) and a .338 BABIP. Perhaps he's finally figured out a successful approach at the plate in the majors, but there looks to be more downside than upside even as he hits his prime at age-26.
379 Matt Davidson (CWS - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2015 Projections 37 100 11 3 7 0 .230
3 Year Average 31 76 8 3 12 0 .237
Outlook: Davidson entered 2014 with high expectations, and he did not meet any of them. The White Sox acquired him in the 2013 offseason for closer Addison Reed, and he only had to beat out the likes of Conor Gillaspie for the Opening Day third base gig. He struck out too much in spring training, however, earned a demotion to Triple-A Charlotte, and then failed to hit .200. Some drop off was to be expected with the change of minor league environments (Reno to Charlotte), but his already-high strikeout rate hit 30% and he struck out 40 times in April alone. Part of the struggle may have been the psychological effect of moving to a new organization with high hopes and then missing the roster, so there is some hope for a rebound. The organization's depth at third remains slim, so he could man the hot corner at some point in 2015.
382 Mike Aviles (Cle - 3B, 2B, LF)
Healthy
ADP: 221.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 113 344 38 5 39 14 .247
2015 Projections 99 404 46 8 41 11 .245
3 Year Average 124 406 50 9 48 12 .249
Outlook: At 34, Aviles' days in the big leagues are likely nearing an end. Each full campaign that he's spent in the big leagues has been part of a steady decline, while his extremely low walk rate (career 4.0% BB%) has kept his on-base percentage well below .300 in each of the past four seasons. The Indians chose to pick up an option on Aviles' contract for 2015, which may give him a short-term run as a veteran mentor or placeholder for top prospect Francisco Lindor. Beyond that, his value comes mostly from his ability to cover a variety of different positions, although the Indians seem unlikely to give him another 20-plus games in left field. Don't be surprised if he fails to accumulate 300 at-bats this season, given the imminent arrival of Lindor and the organization's younger depth available to contribute around the infield.
388 Yangervis Solarte (SD - 3B, 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 131 469 56 10 48 0 .260
2015 Projections 137 517 59 10 47 0 .261
3 Year Average 131 469 56 10 48 0 .260
Outlook: After signing a minor league deal with the Yankees last January, Solarte took full advantage of the opportunity, snagging a utility infield gig from the projected frontrunner, Eduardo Nunez, out of spring training. Earning most of the starts at third base in April and May, Solarte backed up the usage, contending for the AL batting lead for a time before settling for a .299 average, six home runs, 26 RBI, and 22 runs in 174 at-bats after two months. However, a sustained slump soon emerged, triggering a demotion and eventual switch of coasts via the Chase Headley trade with San Diego. Solarte immediately found the National League accommodating, as he was able to maintain a .267/.336/.355 line, while earning 41 starts at third (as well as a handful at the keystone and in left field) across 56 games. Solarte will try to win San Diego's third base job again this spring over Will Middlebrooks and Cory Spangenberg, but he's shown he can be productive in a utility role.
395 Alexi Amarista (SD - SS, 2B, 3B, CF)
Healthy
ADP: 220.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 148 423 39 5 40 12 .239
2015 Projections 33 86 8 1 7 1 .233
3 Year Average 133 355 37 5 35 8 .239
Outlook: Amarista slotted into the Padres' injury-riddled lineup wherever his services were required last season, and the result was at least 13 starts apiece at shortstop, second base, third base and in center field. The super-utilityman earned most of his run at short after Everth Cabrera hit the disabled list with a strained hamstring as the calendar turned to July, which combined with a DUI citation in early September to cap Cabrera at 40 at-bats the rest of the year. While Amarista contributed to the Padres’ season-long hitting woes, he engineered a fair two-month stretch at the plate in July and August, assembling a .272/.326/.343 line, seven extra-base hits (including two home runs), seven stolen bases without a failure, and a 14:26 BB:K in 169 at-bats. For the season, though, he deviated little from his historical norm, offering scant contributions to fantasy endeavors. Following the Padres’ decision to not tender a contract to Cabrera, Amarista enters the spring as the starting shortstop by default, but he’ll have to fend off free-agent addition Clint Barmes for the position.
401 Alex Rodriguez (NYY - 3B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 215.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2015 Projections 119 439 68 18 52 12 .267
3 Year Average 83 310 48 12 38 8 .265
Outlook: Arguably the most polarizing name in the game for 2015. He is coming off the year-long suspension as a result of MLB doing everything it could to nail PED usage to him. He comes back to the Yankees in 2015 after a full season away from live baseball activity, having failed to hit 20 homers in the last three season in which he has played or reach .280 in the last four seasons. If that is not enough to make you nervous, his strikeout rate has worsened each of the past four seasons in which he has played and he hasn’t played in even 140 games for a number of seasons. There is an incredible amount of risk here, but his name is still going to cause him to be drafted in a mixed league. That’s fine, but it should be in the end game. Otherwise, pass.
409 Cody Asche (Phi - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 121 397 43 10 46 0 .252
2015 Projections 131 515 50 13 58 0 .235
3 Year Average 86 280 30 8 34 0 .246
Outlook: Asche spent his first full season in the majors last year earning fairly regular playing time at third base for the Phillies. His numbers were pedestrian outside of a solid month in May where he hit .317 with three of his 10 home runs. He lost playing time to Maikel Franco in September when rosters expanded. Asche does not make contact at a very high clip and lacks the power teams typically look for at third. His defense was also suspect at times. He is said to be a hard worker, so improvement this season is likely, but it would be unrealistic to expect a significant breakout. The Phillies have talked of giving Asche a look in the outfield in order to increase his versitility. That may be necessary to keep his bat in the lineup as Franco is the future for the Phils at third, and he'll have a shot at unseating Asche for the starting job this spring.
417 Yunel Escobar (Was - SS, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 137 476 33 7 39 1 .258
2015 Projections 131 509 49 8 46 3 .251
3 Year Average 145 514 51 8 49 3 .255
Outlook: A shoulder injury in June eventually put Escobar on the disabled list, and his season was eventually cut short by a knee injury in September, but the production when he was healthy was right in line with his first season in Tampa Bay. Defensive metrics graded Escobar as a poor shortstop for the first time in his career, so it will be interesting to see if that decline is merely a blip on the radar, or part of a legitimate skills loss. The majority of Escobar's playing time was spent in the bottom third of the batting order, and the Rays' inability to plate runs consistently as a team had an understandably detrimental impact on his counting stats. Traded to Oakland in January, Escobar was a member of the A's for a few days before he was flipped to Washington for reliever Tyler Clippard. With the Nats, it's expected that Escobar will slide over to second base to maintain a starting role.
419 Casey McGehee (SF - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 160 616 56 4 76 4 .287
2015 Projections 127 486 45 6 54 2 .257
3 Year Average 137 467 46 6 58 2 .263
Outlook: After spending a year getting his game back on track in Japan, McGehee resurrected his career as the Marlins' everyday third baseman and cleanup hitter in 2014. Remarkably, McGehee drove in 76 runs despite knocking just four home runs in 691 plate appearances during his age-31 season. McGehee made up for his lack of power with consistent contact (15.8 K%) and a solid walk rate (9.7 BB%) and slashed .287/.355/.357 while functioning as a strong veteran presence in the locker room. The Marlins decided it was best to sell high during the offseason, shipping McGehee to San Francisco, where he will likely drop a spot or two in the lineup. That said, McGehee should play almost every day and continue to see a fair amount of RBI opportunities, making him a decent late-round value in deeper mixed and NL-only formats.
420 Juan Uribe (LAD - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 220.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 103 386 36 9 54 0 .311
2015 Projections 71 286 29 7 35 1 .269
3 Year Average 100 312 33 8 40 2 .276
Outlook: For an older player, Uribe is anything but consistent. In 2014, he pulled a .311 batting average out of thin air despite walking just 15 times on the season, after not hitting any higher than .289 in any of his previous five campaigns -- that .289 mark was in 2009 and buoyed by a .368 BABIP. He was, in short, a rather unusual candidate to become a one-category third baseman in 2014. He barely topped the the 400 plate-appearance plateau, and managed to drive in more than 50 runs despite hitting fewer than 10 home runs for the third time in four seasons. You are asking for a lot if you expect another high average, as Uribe has hit anywhere from .191 to .311 over the past six seasons. He is at the mercy of the BABIP gods as his home run power wanes in his golden years. He's 10- or 12-team NL-only or mixed-league reserve material in 2015.
460 Justin Turner (LAD - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 109 288 46 7 43 6 .340
2015 Projections 58 230 27 3 26 2 .309
3 Year Average 96 220 26 4 26 2 .305
Outlook: Turner has spent time in four different organizations (Reds, Orioles, Mets, and Dodgers) in his career that dates back to 2006. He hit for average in the minor leagues, but had hit .260/.323/.361 in over 926 plate appearances at the major league level heading into 2014, with little hint of upside. Naturally, he hit .340/.404/.493 in 322 plate appearances in 2014. When one sees an 80-point jump in batting average, it's natural to want to look at the BABIP column and there, we find a .404 BABIP for Turner in 2014. Over the past six seasons, even with that .404 number factored in, Turner has a .322 BABIP. To say the utility infielder is due for some regression is an understatement. He is in for a Chris Johnson-like regression in 2015 and that’s unfortunate for his current fantasy owners because he doesn’t do much else at the plate. Roster carefully.
461 Maikel Franco (Phi - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 221.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 16 56 5 0 5 0 .179
2015 Projections 30 80 8 2 6 0 .225
3 Year Average 16 56 5 0 5 0 .179
Outlook: Franco struggled to adjust in his first three months at the Triple-A level, posting just a .230/.285/.364 batting line in the first half of the season, but a light seemed to go on at the end of June. In the second half of the season, he hit .309/.326/.551 with 10 home runs and earned a promotion to the majors when rosters expanded in September. Franco didn't do much offensively during his month in the majors, but he did show that his defense at third base was major league ready. The Phillies will give him an opportunity to compete for the starting job at third this spring. His upside makes him worth gambling on late in fantasy drafts if he earns a job in camp.
480 Brock Holt (Bos - 3B, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 220.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 106 449 68 4 29 12 .281
2015 Projections 31 80 9 0 4 1 .238
3 Year Average 52 191 28 1 14 4 .272
Outlook: Holt was a revelation when he burst onto the scene for the Red Sox early in 2014. He filled a hole at third base when Will Middlebrooks got injured and doubled up as the team's best leadoff hitter when Jackie Bradley, Jr. and Grady Sizemore weren't cutting it. Holt continued to hit as injured players returned and Boston made roster adjustments, finding spots for him all over the diamond, making it difficult to know which glove Holt would use on a given night. He was mostly a third baseman, but saw significant time in the outfield. Alas, his hitting took a dive in the second half, when he batted .219/.278/.271 in 213 plate appearances after the All-Star break. There was nothing in Holt's dossier to suggest he'd continue to hit like he did in the first half (.327/.371/.463), but he's been a good hitter throughout his stops in the minors. While outfield playing time doesn't appear to be a likely option for Holt in 2015, last season's experience earned him strong consideration for a utility role.
486 Kelly Johnson (Atl - LF, 1B, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 220.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-2
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2014 Season 106 265 29 7 27 2 .215
2015 Projections 49 121 14 4 13 2 .231
3 Year Average 122 379 44 13 45 8 .227
Outlook: Everything you need to know about Johnson can be summed up by this one fact: Over the past six seasons, Johnson has played for seven different teams – Atlanta, Arizona, Toronto, Tampa Bay, New York, Boston and Baltimore. In each stop, it didn’t take those teams long to figure out Johnson’s limitations. He's a left-handed batter with reverse splits so he gets exposed by right-handed pitching with extra at-bats. He can play second base, third base and the corner outfield spots, but is not a good defender at any of the positions. Johnson managed to steal double-digit bases three seasons in a row from 2010 to 2012, but has stolen just nine bases over the past two seasons. Even in a time when the league-wide batting average hovers around .250, Johnson hasn’t even hit .240 over the past four seasons and his home run output has been in decline for five consecutive seasons. He’s no longer mixed league material, but the Braves will allow Johnson to compete for a roster spot during spring training after signing him to a minor league deal in January.
2 3 4 5 6
of
6
a d v e r t i s e m e n t