Pre-Draft Player Rankings

26 Nelson Cruz (Sea - RF, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 30.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 155 589 96 43 105 2 .287
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 155 597 91 42 102 3 .286
Outlook: Many fantasy players have expected Cruz, who turned 36 in July, to lose power. Keep waiting: He topped 40 home runs for the third straight season. Considering his infield flyball rate was his lowest since 2012, he's getting plenty out of his hits in the air. Proving age ain't nothing but a number, he ranked third with a 26.2 percent HR/FB (none below 20.4 since 2012) and second in average exit velocity (96.2 mph, per MLB Statcast). His hard contact and high walk rates say his recent batting averages look real, but his age and batted-ball splits say to be more realistic with something closer to his .275 career clip. Safeco Field hasn't hurt him; he's hit 17 homers at home in each of the last two years, and 15 in 2014. Fantasy players drafting him solely for power won't be disappointed with expectations of 30 homers. The vet still has tools for a top-50 fantasy season, but lower his floor a bit with another year gone.
27 Jonathan Villar (Mil - SS, 2B, 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 32.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 156 589 92 19 63 62 .285
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 99 323 47 9 34 29 .263
Outlook: Villar broke out in 2016, as he not only led the major leagues in stolen bases with 62 (and caught stealing, with 18), but also posted a career best .826 OPS with 19 home runs while playing solid defense across the infield at shortstop, third base and second base. The Brewers acquired Travis Shaw over the offseason, and his presence combined with the callup of top prospect shortstop Orlando Arcia will lock Villar into the starting second baseman role for 2017. The Brewers ran wild in 2016, and there's little reason to believe Craig Counsell's philosophy will change drastically in one year, so expect another big stolen-base total from Villar. The biggest questions, however, pertain to the sustainability of his power production, and the significant improvement in his walk rate, which jumped to a career-best 11.6 percent last season. Most likely, he'll give some home runs back in 2017 after his HR/FB rate nearly doubled from 10.0 percent in 2015 to 19.6 percent last season.
28 Xander Bogaerts (Bos - SS)
Healthy
ADP: 33.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 157 652 115 21 89 13 .294
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 152 601 86 13 72 8 .286
Outlook: The progression of Bogaerts took another step forward in 2016. In 2015, he earned a Silver Slugger award in the American League, but he'd hit just seven homers and had an unsustainable BABIP (.372). The expected power hadn't yet developed and we were curious to see what his numbers would look like when BABIP corrected, which it did in 2016 (.335). The results were encouraging. The 24-year-old's power bat arrived, belting 21 homers with a .152 ISO and he bumped his walk rate to 8.1 percent. Slashing a respectable .294/.356/.446, Bogaerts was a first-time All-Star and earned a second Silver Slugger award. The advanced metrics indicate more runs created and better plate discipline, but it wasn't all good in 2016. There was a continuous fall from his season high .529 slugging and .934 OPS on June 11, to .392/.717 from that point on. Bogaerts is getting closer to a breakout year, which will come when he eliminates the prolonged slumps.
29 A.J. Pollock (Ari - CF)
Healthy
ADP: 38.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 12 41 9 2 4 4 .244
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 81 305 54 10 35 19 .308
Outlook: After a breakout 2015 season in which he registered a handful of MVP votes, Pollock's 2016 was derailed by injury. A fractured elbow sustained toward the end of spring training kept Pollock out until late August. He returned and played in 12 games, but a groin strain shut him down for good. The combination of power and speed, along with the run-scoring that comes with hitting in front of Paul Goldschmidt, made Pollock the source of a lot of fantasy league titles in 2015. Given the natural discounting that follows when a player has been absent for almost a full year, he has the potential to do the same this season. The only real concern is his injury history, considering 2016 and a 2014 season in which he missed significant time due to a broken hand. That risk should be properly cooked into the price, and he could offer first-round value in his age-29 season with a third-round price tag.
30 Francisco Lindor (Cle - SS)
Healthy
ADP: 37.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 604 99 15 78 19 .301
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 128 497 74 14 64 16 .306
Outlook: The 23-year-old has quickly emerged as one of the best hitting shortstops in the game. He has utilized a steady contact-heavy approach to work counts and post a .306/.356/.454 career slash line in 1,122 plate appearances. As evidenced by his low strikeout rate (career 14.0 percent), Lindor seemingly understands that his game is more slash and dash right now than power, but he can still turn on a pitch and yank it out of the yard when a pitcher misses his spot (27 career long balls). In addition to the double-digit home-run pop, Lindor has shown an aptitude for stealing bases, going 31-for-38 over his first two seasons and reaping the benefits of manager Terry Francona's aggressive approach on the basepaths. Throw in the fact that he is split neutral and will continue to hit high in the lineup as he continues to fill out physically, and the sky is truly the limit for Lindor. He may add another level of power to come along to accentuate the high average, good speed, and run production, though it might not happen in 2017. Still, his floor already is lofty enough to put him within the top 50 fantasy picks.
31 Corey Kluber (Cle - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 29.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-3
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 18 9 0 215.0 227 3.14 1.06
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 15 11 0 224.3 247 3.01 1.07
Outlook: Kluber is wrongly perceived as underrated. He's quiet and prior to 2016, Cleveland didn't get a lot of national run, but that hasn't muted Kluber's price. Consider that he was the 35th overall pick on the heels of his Cy Young win in 2015 draft season and then even after a 9-16 season that saw his ERA rise by a full run, the fantasy market still understood just how good he was and slotted him as the 38th overall pick on average. He rewarded that faith with another Cy-worthy effort that saw minimal erosion in his skills with an ERA and WHIP that essentially split the difference on his 2014 and 2015 seasons. Even with the overall stock of SPs dropping, Kluber will likely set a new best Average Draft Position, going somewhere in the top 30 picks. He has the occasional blowup (five starts of five-plus earned runs), but his eight starts of at least eight innings were third-most in MLB. Those five starts were virtually his only bad ones out of 32. He's elite.
32 George Springer (Hou - RF, CF)
DTD
ADP: 38.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 162 644 116 29 82 9 .261
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 114 442 73 22 58 10 .258
Outlook: Springer addressed durability concerns by playing in every game of the 2016 season. His metrics were very much in line with his 2015 efforts nearly across the board. He did set career highs in the counting categories with 29 homers and benefitted from Jose Altuve hitting behind him to score 116 runs. As long as Springer maintains his ability to get on base (.356 career OBP), there is little reason to move him out of the leadoff spot. While he does strike out a bit, he has improved his rate each season to date. Splits-wise, he does prefer lefties (.267/.391/.517; 14 percent walk rate, 23 percent strikeout rate) over righties (.255/.342/.437; 11 percent walks, 27 percent Ks) but his numbers against right-handers are not a killer, though it does help frame why it will be tougher for him to hit for a higher average. The next phase of improvement will be to get more loft on the ball, as a near 50 percent groudball rate is too high for someone with his pop.
33 J.D. Martinez (Ari - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 44.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 120 460 69 22 68 1 .307
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 134 499 73 28 82 3 .299
Outlook: It would be wrong to say Martinez struggled through the first two months of 2016, but his .820 OPS was a level below the upper-.800 range he had shown over the previous the two seasons. When he hit at a 1.076 OPS clip for the first two weeks in June, it looked like everything was back on track until he ran into a wall in foul territory during a game in Kansas City and fractured his left elbow, forcing him to miss nearly two months. There were some concerns about his power upon return, but a dramatic eighth-inning home run against Chris Sale in his first at-bat back stomped that fear down. He got hits in each of his first five games back and 19 of 20 afterward. The bottom line was another 517 plate appearances that further solidify him as one of the game's premier power bats. He flirted with 40 homers back in 2015 before the power surge swept the league, and he remains a candidate to eclipse that mark in a full season.
34 Carlos González (Col - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 41.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 150 584 87 25 100 2 .298
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 124 466 70 25 78 2 .277
Outlook: It wasn't a mirror image by any means, but Gonzalez posted fairly similar numbers in 2016 to those he put up in his bounce-back 2015 campaign. In the past two seasons, he managed to score the exact same number of runs (87), while also maintaining nearly indistinguishable walk and strikeout rates (even if they were still somewhat unimpressive). Although his decrease in home runs is somewhat troubling (he hit 15 fewer in 2016), the All-Star still hit 42 doubles, drove in 100 runs and notched a 27-point jump in his batting average. Better yet: CarGo managed to stay healthy nearly the entire season outside of a couple of minor wrist and ankle issues. The 31-year-old still adheres to the Coors Field effect (.966 home OPS, .744 road OPS) and his speed isn't what it once was, but there's no denying that he is still a solid contributor when healthy. As long as he continues to play half his games in Denver, Gonzalez should continue to be a reliable OF2.
35 Giancarlo Stanton (Mia - RF)
Healthy
ADP: 38.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 119 413 56 27 74 0 .240
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 113 410 64 30 82 6 .266
Outlook: Stanton recorded the five hardest hit balls of the 2016 season as measured by Statcast, finishing behind only Nelson Cruz in average exit velocity. Unfortunately, this didn't translate into the usual bang as Stanton slugged .489, the second lowest mark of his career. As usual, health played a part as Stanton missed time due to rib soreness, hip issues and a groin injury that was supposed to end his season in mid-August. However, he returned for most of September, albeit ineffectively, going 6-for-33 with two long balls. Contact remained an issue as Stanton whiffed at a 30 percent clip for the second straight season. Low contact means reliance on BABIP to sport a decent average, and Stanton's BABIP dropped to a career-low mark, yielding his worst-ever average and OBP. The optimist will use this to snag Stanton at a lower cost than the past several years, while the pessimist cites 2016 as affirmation that Stanton's too risky at such a high cost.
36 José Abreu (CWS - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 45.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 159 624 67 25 100 0 .293
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 153 598 78 30 103 1 .299
Outlook: After three seasons, Abreu's name feels as if it has more value than his actual numbers. His 2014 season was outstanding, and 2015 was pretty good as well, but 2016 feels like a disappointment. Sure, he drove in 100 runs, taking advantage of the opportunities provided to him and hit .293. Yet, in a year where many were hitting 20-plus homers, Abreu hit 25 despite missing only three games all year. His Isolated Power and HR/FB ratio has declined each season he has been in the majors. His GB/FB rate has always been high, but he got away with it when he was hitting one out of every four or five flyballs out of the yard. Last season, that fell to one in every six flyballs which caps his power upside. All the pieces are there, but he has to get more distance on his batted balls to get back to the 30-homer plateau.
37 Brian Dozier (Min - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 43.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 155 615 104 42 99 18 .268
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 156 614 106 31 82 17 .249
Outlook: Dozier has become one of the top fantasy options at second base due to his surging power and added speed. He was having a typical season through the first half (14 home runs, .786 OPS) but surged in the second half with 28 home runs and a .990 OPS over his last 72 games, finishing with 42 homers (the most ever for an AL second baseman). While that home run total may look like a fluke given the large leap from his previous career high (28), there are reasons to think he can approach that level again. Dozier has seen his slugging percentage increase every season in the majors and most of his other statistical measures were in line with his career, although he did have a high 18.4 percent HR/FB rate. Dozier doesn't draw walks at a great rate and strikes out a little too often, which makes his batting average a risk, but he should continue running while frequently hitting in the leadoff spot where he's been most comfortable.
38 Jon Lester (ChC - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 37.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-2
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 19 5 0 202.7 197 2.44 1.02
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 15 9 0 209.0 208 2.76 1.08
Outlook: Lester's age-32 season was arguably the best of his 10 at the big league level as he spun career bests in ERA, WHIP, and batting average against (.209). Little changed with his skill set or his approach against opposing hitters, however, as he struck batters out nearly one-quarter of the time (24.8 percent) for the third straight season and kept his walk rate (6.5 percent) a tick below his career rate (7.8 percent). Despite his ongoing refusal to throw over to first base in order to keep baserunners honest, Lester stranded 84.9 percent of the baserunners who reached against him -- a big jump from the 71.8 percent he held in his first season with the Cubs, and a noticeable spike from his career 75.3 percent mark. There is little reason to expect a full repeat of 2016, but Lester should again have plenty of run support, a good defense around him, and a bullpen capable of protecting his leads this season. That's a profile worthy of a fantasy ace, but one drafted toward the bottom of the tier.
39 Trevor Story (Col - SS)
Healthy
ADP: 46.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SS-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 97 372 67 27 72 8 .272
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 97 372 67 27 72 8 .272
Outlook: Story was given an opportunity in the starting role from Day 1 last season, replacing the suspended Jose Reyes. The rookie took off from the get-go, seemingly tearing down every rookie record in the book. Through the first month of the season, he already had 10 home runs, 20 RBI, and a massive 1.019 OPS. Understandably, he wasn't able to sustain this ridiculously torrid pace, but he managed to put up a .908 OPS, 27 home runs and 72 RBI prior to a thumb injury that cut his season short by two months. Story's 130 strikeouts are a concern, as that number could grow as pitchers figure out his tendencies, and his home/road splits were very different as one would expect for a Coors Field batter (1.086 home OPS vs. .747 road OPS). That being said, Story cemented himself as the shortstop of the future for the Rockies, and he looks to be an excellent source of power at the shortstop position playing half of his games in the thin Colorado air.
40 Wil Myers (SD - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 55.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 157 599 99 28 94 28 .259
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 101 383 59 14 53 13 .248
Outlook: Myers played a career-high 157 games, after two injury-plagued seasons in 2014 and 2015 when he logged just 147 games combined, and the results were better than perhaps anyone could have imagined. Narrowly missing the 30-homer, 30-steal club, and falling just short of 100 runs scored and 100 RBI, Myers was a profitable piece for fantasy owners in 2016, while serving as the Padres' best offensive player. Of some concern, however, is that he faded in the second half. Myers hit 19 of his 28 homers in his first 87 games, while hitting nine in his last 70 contests, and his strikeout rate jumped from 20.6 percent in the first half to 27.6 percent in the second half, while his OPS fell from .873 to .697. Overall, Myers displayed improved skills in many facets, using the opposite field more frequently, and posting a career-low 8.0 percent swinging-strike rate that bodes well for his chances of maintaining something more in line with his first-half strikeout rate going forward, and the Padres' aggressive tendencies on the basepaths seem unlikely to change this season.
41 Johnny Cueto (SF - SP)
DL10
ADP: 43.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 18 5 0 219.7 198 2.79 1.09
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 16 9 0 225.0 205 2.80 1.06
Outlook: The Giants' big offseason acquisition turned out to be a smashing success in Year 1 of the six-year deal. Cueto turned in ace-like numbers with a 2.79 ERA, 1.09 WHIP and a 4.4 K/BB ratio while earning early Cy Young contender mentions after starting the season 13-1. His strengths lie in his pinpoint control and ability to hit both sides of the plate with all three of his fastballs. While his crafty pitching style and excellent command could offset an eventual drop in velocity, the 30-year-old was still dialing up his four-seam and two-seam fastballs in the low-to-mid 90s, similar to his prime years in Cincinnati. There is no reason to think that Cueto can't repeat his success with the Giants in 2017, making him a safe high-end pitcher to invest in.
42 Yu Darvish (Tex - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 47.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 7 5 0 100.3 132 3.41 1.12
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 8 6 0 122.3 157 3.24 1.20
Outlook: Darvish's road to recovery from Tommy John surgery had some speed bumps, as a return trip to the disabled list with neck and shoulder issues occurred just three starts into his comeback. He didn't get as many as 90 pitches into a start until just before the All-Star break, after which he went on a streak of eight consecutive quality starts. The Rangers were careful with his single-game workloads, allowing Darvish to exceed 100 pitches in just two of his 17 starts, but most compelling was his sudden affinity for low-walk outings. Darvish walked one or zero batters in 11 of those 17 starts, and in the low-walk games he had a K:BB of 90:9 in 69.1 combined innings. Pitch command is typically the last thing to come around for a pitcher coming off major elbow surgery, so the fact that his stuff was intact and that his command was potentially better than pre-Tommy John mean that his skills survived the trip under the knife. He could take off once fully unbridled.
43 Billy Hamilton (Cin - CF)
Healthy
ADP: 55.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 119 411 69 3 17 58 .260
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 128 462 66 4 31 57 .247
Outlook: Hamilton pushed his OBP to a career-best .321 last season -- a 47-point jump from 2015 -- and that improvement was fueled by his second straight season with an increased walk rate (7.8 percent). He also maintained his improved efficiency as a basestealer, going 58-for-66 on the heels of his 57-for-65 mark in 2015. Finally, Hamilton hit the ball on the ground more frequently last season (47.7 percent groundball rate), which allowed him to use his speed to push his batting average to a career-high .260. Health is a major issue for Hamilton, as he returned from offseason shoulder surgery to begin 2016, and proceeded to lose time due to a concussion, thumb contusion, minor knee injury and an oblique injury that eventually shut him down for good. Hamilton declared himself to be healthy in December, and the skills growth he showed last season points to a potential spike in the stolen-base department if he can avoid the injury bug.
44 Kyle Seager (Sea - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 54.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 597 89 30 99 3 .278
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 159 603 82 27 90 5 .270
Outlook: Little brother Corey took most of the headlines, but after 2016, Kyle has increased his home run total in each major-league season, backed up with flyball rates of over 40 percent each year. He ranked in the top 25 with a 38.7 percent hard-contact rate, though because he hits so many balls in the air, it hasn't translated to anything close to a .300 batting average. A career-best 10.2 percent walk rate from last year enabled him to emerge as surprising OBP asset in those formats. Even though he is not a batting average anchor, he is incredibly safe in that department, as his contact rate hasn't fallen below 82.4 percent in any year. He's an increasingly stable player (155-plus games played in the last five years), sitting near the top shelf of a suddenly deep position, himself in position to drive in plenty of runs for the surprisingly tasty Seattle lineup. Last year might've marked his peak, and his ceiling falls a bit short of other top-10 third basemen. Still, even if he's plateaued, he's achieved a profile worth a strong investment.
45 Rougned Odor (Tex - 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 54.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 150 605 89 33 88 14 .271
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 128 472 61 19 66 8 .265
Outlook: A popular sleeper heading into 2016, Odor did anything but stink up the joint, instead cashing in as one of fantasy's most profitable players. Despite his pint-sized build (5-foot-11, 195 pounds), he ranked third in home runs among second basemen and tied for 21st overall. He launched more flyballs than in his 2015 rookie stint, and Odor enjoyed one of the league's most significant improvements in his rate of infield pop-ups (19.1 percent in 2015, 8.2 percent in 2016). He was getting more out of his aerial attacks with an apparently more effective bat path through the zone. That should keep him above 20 taters, even with regression. The 14 stolen bases (thanks to his elite base running rating) and .271 batting average -- despite his low walk rate -- look repeatable. Of course, those looking for a great batting average won't find it: He's an aggressive pull-hitting hacker. Fantasy players in on-base-percentage leagues may want to avoid overpaying. Even with his contact flaws, however, the four-category production makes him one of fake baseball's best second basemen, especially pertaining to power.
46 Jake Arrieta (ChC - SP)
Healthy
ADP: 39.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 18 8 0 197.3 190 3.10 1.08
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 17 6 0 194.3 198 2.41 0.97
Outlook: Following a heavy 2015 workload (248.2 innings, including the postseason) there were concerns as to how Arrieta might respond atop the Cubs' rotation last season. After opening 2016 with a bang -- including his second career no-hitter in April -- Arrieta showed signs of regression during the second half, as his strikeout rate tumbled (from 26.1% to 20.9%) while his first-half control woes persisted (9.6% BB% in 2016 after he posted a 5.5% mark in 2015). At a glance, the walks seem like the biggest issue, but Arrieta's home-run rate nearly doubled from 2015, and it's fair to wonder if he's already peaked approaching his age-31 campaign. Even if 2016 is the new baseline, he is still an upper-tier starting pitcher. However, consecutive seasons with heavy workloads, and a reduced reliance on his cutter, may foretell more carefully monitored workloads, especially since he's only eclipsed 200 innings in the regular once as a big league starter.
47 Yoenis Céspedes (NYM - CF, LF)
Healthy
ADP: 49.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 132 479 72 31 86 3 .280
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 148 571 87 29 97 6 .277
Outlook: The Cuban slugger is coming off a pair of outstanding seasons, though 2016 was hampered by a lingering groin injury which eventually required a short visit to the DL in early August. That didn't stop Cespedes from topping the 30-homer mark for the second straight season. He also exhibited more patience, walking nine percent of the time, a new career high. Cespedes' game still revolves around swinging as hard as he can in case he happens to make contact, something he's done at a steady 77-79 percent clip the last three years -- not great but acceptable in today's higher strikeout climate. The only thing keeping Cespedes from elite status is a lack of steals as players that can chip in 10 or so along with pop are more highly sought after. Still, Cespedes is easily a top-40 player so be ready to pony up on draft day.
48 Christian Yelich (Mia - LF, CF)
Healthy
ADP: 61.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 155 578 78 21 98 9 .298
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 142 545 78 12 65 15 .294
Outlook: Coming into the 2016 campaign, Yelich totaled 20 homers in 1,458 career plate appearances with the Marlins. He matched that, then added another for good luck, sending 21 long balls out of the yard last season. A power spike has long been expected for Yelich as he hits the ball hard, it's just that most of his batted balls are line drives and grounders. He lofted a few more balls, touching 20 percent flyballs for the first time in his career (most power hitters nestle around 40 percent). The added pop emanated from a surge to a 24 percent HR/FB mark, the 14th highest mark among qualified hitters. The safe play is to expect some give-back, dropping Yelich's homers into the low to mid-teens. Also of concern are dwindling steals as Yelich snagged just nine in 13 attempts. He's still a very solid hitter with a projectable floor. Just don't chase last season's tenuous power breakout.
49 Gregory Polanco (Pit - RF, LF)
DL10
ADP: 68.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 144 527 79 22 86 17 .258
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 129 466 71 13 57 19 .253
Outlook: Polanco seemingly played two totally different seasons in 2016. In 78 games through July 4, he batted .297/.374/.521 with 12 home runs, 50 RBI and nine steals in 330 plate appearances. Though he hit 10 homers with 36 RBI and eight steals in his final 257 plate appearances, he also wilted with a .220 clip and .682 OPS. His power output says there wasn't much of an issue, but injuries to his knee, shoulder, hamstring and face, via a collision with a wall, contributed to his uneven performance, and he has now suffered noteworthy swoons in each of his first three campaigns. At 25, he is still young enough to take another step forward, and his sizable increase in hard contact shows that he's squaring up pitches better. Unfortunately, his tall frame seems susceptible to injury. While the outfielder set career highs in home runs and RBI, his ceiling is even higher across the board -- but only if he can stay healthy and soften his dips in production.
50 Anthony Rendon (Was - 3B)
Healthy
ADP: 68.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 156 567 91 20 85 12 .270
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 130 497 82 15 64 10 .276
Outlook: Rendon rebounded nicely from his miserable, injury-plagued 2015, playing in a career-high 156 games and nearly duplicating his 2014 production. He also had his best defensive season at third base, and seems ready to settle in as a key part of a dangerous Nationals offense. The emergence of Trea Turner and the addition of Adam Eaton lock up the top two spots in the team's batting order, though, likely putting the 111 runs Rendon scored in 2014 out of reach. However, if he hits fifth behind the likes of Bryce Harper and Daniel Murphy, he should top last year's career-high 85 RBI. His career-high 43.8 percent flyball rate in 2016 could be a sign that he's adding a little more loft to his line-drive swing. Until he proves he can string a couple of full campaigns together, health remains the biggest concern for Rendon, but if he can stay off the DL, the pieces appear to be in place for him to put forth another well-rounded campaign.
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