Pre-Draft Player Rankings

62 Aroldis Chapman (NYY - RP)
DL10
ADP: 53.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 4 1 36 58.0 90 1.55 0.86
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 3 35 59.3 104 1.67 0.96
Outlook: Chapman missed 30 games due to suspension at the outset of 2016 following a domestic violence incident at his home during the offseason. He recorded his first save as a Yankee in his second appearance with the club in early May and proceeded to reel off a stretch with 44 strikeouts in 31.1 innings before he was shipped to the Cubs in July. Chapman immediately became the preferred ninth-inning option in Chicago, and his dominance with the Cubs included a 1.01 ERA and 0.82 WHIP to go with a 46:10 K:BB over 26.2 innings. Despite the time lost with his suspension, Chapman piled up 36 saves in 39 chances, while posting ratios in the neighborhood of his previous career-bests with the Reds in 2012. Now 29, Chapman still lights up the radar gun with triple-digit velocity, while keeping hitters off-balance with his high-80s slider. After returning to the Yankees via free agency, Chapman will be among the first closers off the board on draft day.
77 Zach Britton (Bal - RP)
DL10
ADP: 70.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 1 47 67.0 74 0.54 0.84
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 1 40 69.7 72 1.42 0.90
Outlook: The last time Britton was seen on a field, it was when manager Buck Showalter was saving him for the wild card save that never happened. It is a shame that is the last memory we have of him because Britton had an amazing year building upon his stellar 2015 season. Britton continued a three-year run of dominance as a fantasy closer due to a nasty combination of high strikeouts and an incredibly high groundball rate. He has some risks for 2017 since his 0.54 ERA can realistically only go up and a low .244 BABIP may not be sustainable. The good news is that despite the wild card episode, his manager has supreme confidence in him and will use him often throughout the season. Even with ratio regression, he will still be very good across the board and is as safe as closers come.
80 Kenley Jansen (LAD - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 64.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 3 2 47 68.7 104 1.83 0.67
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 2 2 42 62.0 95 2.32 0.87
Outlook: In his walk year, Jansen posted career bests in saves (47), ERA (1.83) and WHIP (0.67). Batters were simply unable to properly square up the 29-year-old's cutter, which was regularly hitting the mid-90s by season's end. That isn't a new development, as Jansen's career low strikeout rate in the majors is 37.6 percent from his rookie year in 2010. His K-BB% (37.1 percent) and FIP (1.44) both ranked second among qualified relievers last season, solidifying his place in the very highest tier of MLB bullpen arms. The new development is he showed an ability to last multiple innings in a game during the playoffs, a la Andrew Miller, throwing 20.1 innings across seven postseason games. Jansen remained where he was comfortable, signing a five-year $80 million deal with the Dodgers this offseason, making his outlook pretty straight forward. He will remain one of the top closers on the board as long as his skills remain constant.
92 Craig Kimbrel (Bos - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 83.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 6 31 53.0 83 3.40 1.09
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 2 4 39 58.0 88 2.48 1.02
Outlook: On the surface, Kimbrel filled his role as Boston's closer well. He converted 31 of 33 save opportunities and struck out 14.1 batters per nine innings. But if you dig a bit deeper, Kimbrel had his problems. While unhittable for stretches, an intermittent loss of the strike zone led to career highs in walks per nine innings (5.1) and losses (six). The walks made him somewhat unreliable, most notably in a gut-punching loss to the Yankees on the night the Red Sox "clinched" the AL East. And he was abysmal when called on in non-save situations. Kimbrel allowed 12 runs (11 earned) on 15 hits and 14 walks in 19.1 innings when the game wasn't on the line. Maybe that's not a big deal, but Boston will presumably continue to use him occasionally in non-save situations, so it is something to be aware of. Kimbrel will return as Boston's closer, with Tyler Thornburg and Joe Kelly getting the first shot as setup men.
99 Mark Melancon (SF - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 87.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 2 47 71.3 65 1.64 0.90
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 3 44 73.0 66 1.97 0.89
Outlook: Melancon was once again dominant in 2016, and while his strikeout rate is no longer above 9.0 per nine innings, his elite cutter produces as much weak contact and as many easy outs as any pitch in the majors. He hasn't allowed a BABIP above .275 in three seasons, and a HR/9 rate above 0.47 in four. The 32-year-old right-hander didn't miss a beat after being dealt to the Nationals at the deadline, and his 98 saves over the last two seasons lead the majors. The Giants signed him to a four-year contract in the offseason, and while his lack of an overpowering fastball does cause him to get overlooked when the league's best closers get named, Melancon's track record of success is a match for anyone's. Expect him to continue his exceptional run in San Francisco.
100 Roberto Osuna (Tor - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 99.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 4 3 36 74.0 82 2.68 0.93
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 2 4 28 72.0 78 2.63 0.93
Outlook: After a successful 20-save campaign in 2015, Osuna began his sophomore season with the newly acquired Drew Storen threatening to take the closer role. By the end of 2016, the latter was no longer on the roster and Osuna had locked down 36 saves in 42 chances. Among AL relievers, the right-hander finished sixth in saves and tied for fourth with 72 appearances. He demonstrated elite command by averaging more than a strikeout per inning and 1.7 BB/9. The 22-year-old's average fastball (95.8 mph) is the real deal, while his 0.93 WHIP ranks among the best in MLB. His Achilles heel was a tendency to give up the long ball. After serving up three home runs over 39.2 innings prior to the All-Star break, Osuna surrendered six in 34.1 second-half innings. Needless to say, his post-break ERA of 3.15 was significantly worse than the 2.27 he posted before the Midsummer Classic. Osuna has the tools to be a perennial top-10 closer.
103 Wade Davis (ChC - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 95.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 1 27 43.3 47 1.87 1.13
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 6 1 16 61.0 78 1.18 0.90
Outlook: When a 1.87 ERA is nearly double what you've averaged the previous two seasons, the bar's been set extremely high. Davis did exhibit a couple of yellow flags last season, most notably dropping a mph off his fastball, missing time with a flexor strain in his pitching elbow and a second straight year of a declining strikeout rate. Plus, his walks spiked. However, as usual, Davis did a remarkable job keeping the ball in the yard, not allowing a homer for the second time in three seasons. The righty reliever closed out September with seven scoreless outings, fanning nine with just one walk over those seven frames, which helped ease the residual injury concern. Even with the velocity drop, Davis sported an elite 9.8 K/9. Davis may not be one of the first couple closers off the board in 2017, but he still belongs in the top 10 especially after joining the winningest team in baseball in a December trade. If you prefer to pay for saves, Davis should be on your shopping list.
104 Seung Hwan Oh (StL - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 98.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 6 3 19 79.7 103 1.92 0.92
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 6 3 19 79.7 103 1.92 0.92
Outlook: Heading into the 2016 campaign, Oh was a 33-year-old rookie and St. Louis' oldest reliever. He'd been a fantastic player in Korea, but there were still questions about how his game would translate to the MLB. It didn't take long for Oh to put any doubts to rest, as he held a 1.59 ERA and .159 opponent batting average heading into the All-Star break. By the end of the year, Oh stood as the fantasy darling of the Cardinals' bullpen and had put together a 1.92 ERA, 0.92 WHIP, and 32.9 percent strikeout rate while walking less than six percent of the batters he faced. With a fastball that averages 92.8 mph, Oh doesn't overwhelm batters with power and frequently relies on his slider, which he uses over 31 percent of the time. Looking at 2017, Oh will begin the season as the Cards' closer and likely command a top-10 closer price at the draft table.
105 Edwin Díaz (Sea - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 106.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: MR-2
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 0 4 18 51.7 88 2.79 1.16
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 0 4 18 51.7 88 2.79 1.16
Outlook: Seattle's save chances were dominated in the first half by Steve Cishek. However, after Cishek landed on the disabled list, Diaz, once a top starting pitching prospect, took the reins and never looked back. He dazzled in the bullpen over the final two-plus months, going 18-for-21 in save chances. Diaz ranked sixth in second-half K/9 (14.3) among arms with 20-plus appearances, behind Ken Giles, Kenley Jansen, Dellin Betances, Craig Kimbrel and Aroldis Chapman. On the season, he finished fourth among relievers with an 18.5 swinging-strike percentage. While his his walk rate was a sparkling 2.6 BB/9, he has bouts of inefficiency and must aim to get ahead in more at-bats. Still, the right-hander, who turns 23 in March, boasts outstanding peripherals (33.6 K-BB%) and electric stuff. Even with some correction perhaps coming, Diaz could deliver numbers befitting a top-five fantasy closer at a discount relative to bigger names.
108 Ken Giles (Hou - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 113.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 5 15 65.7 102 4.11 1.29
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 4 3 10 60.3 84 2.54 1.13
Outlook: Giles increased his strikeout rate from 2015 by nearly two strikeouts per nine innings but ended up with the same number of saves (15), as it took him some time to wrestle the closer job away from Luke Gregerson. As a member of the Phillies in 2015, Giles allowed two homers all season, but that rate quadrupled with the Astros last year although half of his home runs allowed came during his first month in Houston. Giles began the season allowing 20 baserunners, four homers, and 10 earned runs in just 10 April innings. From May on, Giles struck out 88 batters, allowed four home runs, and was the same dominant reliever the club gave up so much to acquire during the offseason. The 4.11 ERA was bad, but the 2.86 FIP shows where things could be if the home run rate settles in between 2015 and 2016. Roster him with confidence.
109 Danny Duffy (KC - SP, RP)
Healthy
ADP: 104.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: SP-2
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 12 3 0 179.7 188 3.51 1.14
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 9 8 0 155.3 134 3.36 1.20
Outlook: Duffy had a breakout season in transitioning to the rotation from the bullpen after two months, showing excellent skills in 26 starts. There was some slowdown in September as his velocity tailed off and home runs became a big issue (nine in 36 innings). Duffy enjoyed career-bests in strikeout rate, walk rate, and swinging-strike rate, though some of his control gains with the fastball seemed to come at the expense of his command with the pitch yielding career-worsts in home run rate and hard-contact rate. An excellent slider and changeup hid the declining velocity until September (though his 94.5 mph average in Sept. is nothing to sneeze at). He has a great foundation with premier velocity and two swing-and-miss secondaries. If his finish was more fatigue from a career-high 179.7 innings pitched than the league figuring him out, then there's a lot more success to come. The homer issue preaches some caution, but there's still upside to bid on.
113 David Robertson (CWS - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 118.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 5 3 37 62.3 75 3.47 1.36
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 5 4 37 63.3 86 3.27 1.12
Outlook: Robertson earned the nickname "Houdini" early in his career for his ability to create bad situations, then escape them by stranding runners. After all, we're talking about a reliever who has stranded 79.1 percent of baserunners throughout 519 career innings. In 2016, he stranded 79.9 percent of baserunners but still posted a 3.47 ERA by falling back into the bad habit of giving up free passes, walking 32 batters last season after walking 36 over the previous two seasons combined. Couple that with a drop in his strikeout rate with a 31-point jump in his opponents' batting average, and you get the high reliever ERA. He had offseason knee surgery to clean up a meniscus tear that may have contributed to his struggles, and is expected to be ready for spring training. Unless the injury lingers or the rebuilding White Sox trade him, pencil him in for another 30 saves while, in some cases, handcuffing him with Nate Jones just in case.
118 Kelvin Herrera (KC - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 123.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 6 12 72.0 86 2.75 0.96
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 4 4 70.7 70 2.29 1.06
Outlook: For the fourth straight season, Herrera registered at least 20 holds, joining Tony Watson as the only relievers to accomplish the feat. Skills-wise, Herrera took his game to a new level, combining a return to a double-digit strikeout rate with a precipitous drop in walks. Integral to Herrera's improvement was throwing fewer fastballs, dropping from 75 percent heaters to 60, while introducing a plus slider to his arsenal. Herrera's fantasy owners got a bonus when the dominant righty assumed closing duties while Wade Davis was on the disabled list, converting all 10 of his save opportunities in that span. With Davis getting dealt to the reigning world champs in the offseason, the ninth inning will belong to Herrera going forward. He was useful even when he was not getting saves on a regular basis, and now he should be viewed as a top-10 closer, as he has the skills and has shown himself capable of handling the role.
119 Cody Allen (Cle - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 119.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 3 5 32 68.0 87 2.51 1.00
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 4 5 30 69.0 92 2.48 1.07
Outlook: Allen has proven to be one of the more stable high-leverage relievers in the game, but he's not without flaws. He struck out a third of the batters he faced in 2016, but also walked another 10 percent and allowed a home run on one out of every six flyballs put into play. Historically, he has been split neutral, but in 2016, lefties did get to him (.214/.295/.382) while righties went up there just hoping to put something safely into play (.136/.230/.270). Allen has been very durable for a reliever the past four seasons, gets strikeouts in bunches and continues to post strong ratios despite a walk rate on the high side. The positives outweigh the negatives, but keep that mind that he may have to continue splitting save chances with Andrew Miller as manager Terry Francona mixes and matches late in games.
123 Alex Colomé (TB - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 125.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 4 37 56.7 71 1.91 1.02
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 4 3 12 63.3 57 3.13 1.22
Outlook: Colome was one of the few pleasant stories for the Rays in 2016 following his sudden induction into the closer's role after Brad Boxberger suffered an abdominal injury in spring training. The 27-year-old impressively notched 37 saves in 40 chances, successfully converting 21 consecutive save chances to begin the campaign. Colome's body of work firmly entrenched Boxberger in a setup role upon his eventual return, and the same pecking order will apply entering next spring. Colome posted elite metrics in the categories of K/9 (11.3) and K/BB (4.73), while regularly firing a mid-90s fastball. Control was certainly another strong point, as the right-hander generated a solid 2.4 BB/9 and 1.02 WHIP. His upside may only be capped by the Rays' inability to frequently enter the late innings with leads to protect, but even a modest improvement overall could vault Colome into the elite 45-plus save range in 2017.
128 Francisco Rodríguez (Det - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 131.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: MR-2
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 3 4 44 58.3 52 3.24 1.13
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 4 42 61.0 62 2.80 1.00
Outlook: Rodriguez's 2017 option was picked up by Detroit, so he appears poised to once again serve as a reasonably priced source of saves. The 35-year-old righty has notched 126 saves across stops with the Brewers and Tigers over the past two seasons, and while his velocity readings and fielding independent numbers always seem to suggest he is pitching over his head, he may be the best example of someone who has the "closer mentality" -- if such a thing exists. Along with the saves, he can still get a decent amount of strikeouts while batters chase the changeup and breaking ball out of the zone, and he still posts solid ratios. While his ERA often fluctuates from year to year, he has kept it at 3.24 or lower in each of the past four seasons, although most projection systems will have him eclipsing that mark this season. He is the type of closer that is easier to roster than watch, as things often get interesting, even as he posted a career-best 54.7 percent groundball rate last season.
130 AJ Ramos (Mia - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 135.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 1 4 40 64.0 73 2.81 1.36
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 3 24 66.0 78 2.45 1.20
Outlook: The plan was for Ramos to battle Carter Capps for the right to close games in South Beach, but after Capps required Tommy John surgery, Ramos took advantage, setting a new career best with 40 saves. Ramos continued his dominant ways, fanning bats at a double-digit rate per nine for the third straight season. However, he gave back some of the control gains he made the previous season, along with being victimized with a high hit rate. The result was a rather high 1.36 WHIP, the worst of his career. Ramos' saving grace was allowing only one homer in 64 innings, a repeat of the feat he also accomplished in 2014. Funny things can happen to relievers in small samples, but an increase in walks is worrisome. Ramos will open the campaign where he ended the last one, as closer. The sketchy control keeps him from the elite tier despite the requisite whiffs. Don't wait too long, however, as someone will see the saves and strikeouts and pounce.
138 Sam Dyson (Tex - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 140.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: MR-3
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 3 2 38 70.3 55 2.43 1.22
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 4 2 13 62.7 53 2.44 1.21
Outlook: One of baseball's leading groundball pitchers finally flashed those skills in a notable fantasy role, running away with Texas' closer gig after Shawn Tolleson imploded. He boasts a 2.45 ERA since 2013, mainly via a dominant two-seamer/sinker. Still, he carries a few warning signs for 2017. Dyson has quietly allowed homers at a more frequent rate in the last two years. Relievers can keep high left on-base percentages, but his jump to 85.4 looks ripe to dip back toward his career 77.1 mark. His strikeout rate (7.0 per nine) and swinging-strike percentage (8.3) were his lowest in his three seasons with significant work. Dyson's walk rate also ballooned to 4.1 BB/9 in the second half. Fantasy owners shouldn't bet on a closer sustaining success with those numbers, no matter how good his signature pitch. He's particularly risky since Texas has several options who may keep his leash short.
149 Jeurys Familia (NYM - RP)
DL60
ADP: 133.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 3 4 51 77.7 84 2.55 1.21
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 2 4 33 77.7 81 2.20 1.12
Outlook: The flame-throwing righty's ratios fell back from 2015 but his fantasy owners didn't complain as Familia led the majors with 51 saves. He threw 77-plus innings for the third straight season, more than the average closer. The extra frames embellish his near double-digit strikeout rate and give his ratios a little more impact. The only blemish in Familia's skill set is inconsistent control. As an extreme groundball pitcher, he's going to have a high hit rate so he needs a low walk rate to keep his WHIP in check. His home run rate is aided by limited flyballs, which in turn yields a low ERA. To wit, Familia surrendered only one homer last season, with 10 allowed over the past three seasons spanning 233 frames. Familia may not be the first closer off the board or the most expensive, but he's not far off from those options in terms of skills. Just beware that while domestic abuse charges against Familia were dismissed, he could still face discipline from Major League Baseball.
150 Andrew Miller (Cle - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 132.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: MR-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 10 1 12 74.3 123 1.45 0.69
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 6 3 16 66.0 109 1.77 0.77
Outlook: Miller had a historically elite season for a non-closer reliever last season. He struck out 45 percent -- FORTY FIVE PERCENT!! -- of the batters he faced in 2016 while holding them to a .159 batting average. That was the third consecutive season in which Miller has struck out at least 40 percent of the batters he's faced while holding them below a .160 batting average. For all of that amazing dominance, he has 49 saves over the past three seasons. Miller has been a sabermetric dream for relief pitcher usage, but he really took off after a midseason trade to Cleveland under Indians manager Terry Francona, who used him to put out early fires while eschewing the traditional usage of the team's best reliever for later innings. Miller would be an amazing full-time closer again if Cleveland were to trade Cody Allen, but the team seems quite willing to use Miller in a multitude of hats. Not piling up saves at a steady clip deflates his rotisserie value a bit, but Miller is still a better choice than many starting pitchers thanks to his excellent ratios and top-end strikeout rate.
153 Dellin Betances (NYY - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 146.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 3 6 12 73.0 126 3.08 1.12
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 5 3 7 82.3 131 1.97 0.96
Outlook: Relegated to seventh-inning duty early on, Betances eventually took over the closer role after Andrew Miller and Aroldis Chapman were dealt at the trade deadline. Betances cruised through the first half, posting a 2.66 ERA and ridiculous 16.0 K/9, but fatigue seemed to catch up to the 28-year-old during the final month. Betances, who has made 217 total appearances over the last three seasons, stumbled to a 9.64 ERA with eight walks in 9.1 innings after the start of September. Still, the skills seem to be holding steady and after a full offseason of rest, the righty figures to enter 2017 once again as one of the game's best relievers. He'll return to a setup role with the Yankees re-signing Chapman.
165 Adam Ottavino (Col - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 158.1
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 1 3 7 27.0 35 2.67 0.93
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 1 2 4 34.0 39 2.91 1.09
Outlook: Ottavino was forced to miss the beginning of the season after undergoing Tommy John surgery in May of 2015, but he didn't miss a beat once he was back in commission. In 11.2 innings during his first month off the disabled list, the right-hander didn't allow a single run, struck out over a batter per inning, and held a stellar 0.94 WHIP, prompting the Rockies to promote him to the closer's role, where he went 7-for-11 in save opportunities. Although his final 2.67 ERA looks impressive on its own, it's worth noting that five of the eight earned runs he allowed on the season were given up in the same inning, while he gave up more than one hit only one time during every other appearance. He's in line to begin 2017 as the Rockies' closer, and as long as he continues inducing plenty of groundballs and striking out batters at a healthy rate, Ottavino seems primed for success even as a reliever in the most hitter-friendly park in baseball.
178 Neftalí Feliz (Mil - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 187.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 4 2 2 53.7 61 3.52 1.14
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 2 8 44.3 40 4.26 1.26
Outlook: The oft-injured Feliz pitched 53.2 innings in 2016 (his highest total since 2011) before a muscular arm injury shut him down. He made just one appearance in September and limped to a 5.02 ERA and 1.84 WHIP in his final 15 games, but proved serviceable for the first four months of the season. Overall, the 28-year-old registered a 3.52 ERA (3.72 xFIP) and a 10.2 K/9. He struggled with the home run (19.2 HR/FB) but otherwise showed promise following a disastrous 2015. Feliz collected a career-high 30 holds last year, and he appears to be in line to be the closer for Milwaukee heading into the season, but his weak finish and arm injury make him risky entering 2017.
188 Jim Johnson (Atl - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 183.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 2 6 20 64.7 68 3.06 1.19
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 3 5 11 61.7 53 4.67 1.51
Outlook: Johnson was added by Atlanta last year in what appeared to be a placeholder deal where they could build up his trade value to move him to a contender for a prospect or two in July. Instead, Atlanta was so impressed with Johnson's efforts that they kept him all season and gave him a two-year deal this offseason. His 20 saves were a far cry from the back-to-back 50-save seasons he had for Baltimore a few seasons back, but he was a better pitcher in 2016 than he was then. Johnson added strikeouts to his game (career-high 25.6 percent strikeout rate) and did not sacrifice his ability to generate groundballs. After outperforming his peripherals in Baltimore, the opposite was finally the case for Johnson, as his career-low 2.71 FIP was superior to his 3.06 ERA. The closer job should be his, but his new deal is still friendly enough that he could be dealt to a contender if he can maintain this newfound ability to miss bats at an above average clip.
189 Brandon Kintzler (Min - RP)
Healthy
ADP: 180.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: CL-1
W L SV IP K ERA WHIP
2016 Season 0 2 17 54.3 35 3.15 1.23
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 1 2 6 40.0 24 3.38 1.35
Outlook: Kintzler was an unheralded minor league signing last season as the Twins signed him for depth and he began the season at Triple-A. After Glen Perkins was lost for the year due to injury and Kevin Jepsen proved ineffective, Kintzler surprisingly got a shot at the closer role in June and kept the job the rest of the season. While Kintzler had just a 5.8 K/9, he kept batters off base with good control (1.33 BB/9) and generated groundballs (61.9 percent of batted balls), leading to conversions on 17 of 20 save chances. Despite his success, he's just as unlikely a candidate to keep the job given his lack of dominant velocity (92.7 mph average fastball) and mediocre strikeout rates (career 6.5 K/9). However, his success as a closer last season should give him the first chance at the role in 2016.
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