Pre-Draft Player Rankings

2 Miguel Cabrera (Det - 1B, 3B, DH)
DTD
ADP: 2.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 148 555 103 44 137 3 .348
2014 Projections 160 589 103 38 122 2 .338
3 Year Average 157 583 108 39 127 3 .340
Outlook: In what has become the norm, Cabrera put together another season for the ages in 2013, besting even his 2012 Triple Crown campaign. Cabrera finished last season hitting .348/.442/.636 with 44 homers, 137 RBI and 103 runs. His 1.078 OPS was easily a career best as he paced the rest of the majors by a wide margin in the category. His plate discipline improved dramatically, bouncing back from a dip in walk rate during the 2012 season (9.8 percent), to 13.8 percent last year. And the scary part is Miggy’s season could have been even better if not for a lingering groin injury, which sapped his production at the plate in September and during the postseason. After the Tigers were ousted from the playoffs, Cabrera was diagnosed with a groin tear. He underwent surgery in late October to repair the injury, but is fully expected to be ready for spring training. To help prevent future injury risk, the Tigers are expected to slide Cabrera back over to first base following the trade of Prince Fielder to Texas in November. At age 30, Cabrera is still in the prime of his career. Barring an unforeseen setback, fantasy owners will once again want to target Cabrera near the top of the draft.
3 Paul Goldschmidt (Ari - 1B)
DL15
ADP: 5.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 160 602 103 36 125 15 .302
2014 Projections 117 434 68 20 71 13 .283
3 Year Average 118 424 71 21 78 12 .290
Outlook: The brightest star in Arizona's lineup, Goldschmidt had an MVP-worthy year, hitting 36 home runs and driving in 125 runs, while slugging .551. It was the kind of breakout year the organization knew he was capable of, and MVP voters took note, as he finished second to Andrew McCutchen for the honors during the offseason. He's the biggest constant in the batting order, and 2014 figures to be another outstanding campaign for the 26-year-old stud, as his contributions as a five-category player will make him the first player off the board at his position in many leagues this spring.
9 Chris Davis (Bal - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 10.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 160 584 103 53 138 4 .286
2014 Projections 114 434 71 35 78 2 .302
3 Year Average 119 433 68 30 81 2 .277
Outlook: Davis gave validity to the age-27 theorists with a monster season that warranted him MVP consideration. He led the league in home runs (53) and RBI (138), despite slowing down in the second half of the season with a .245/.339/.515 line over his final 65 games. Davis also finished fifth in MLB with a 29.6% strikeout rate, but his .348 ISO (also tops in MLB) shows that his raw power could help him sustain his 2013 numbers. The power output alone has vaulted Davis into the fantasy elite among first basemen, and while he may not hit as high as .286 again, he could prove capable of providing 40 homers annually.
12 Joey Votto (Cin - 1B)
DL60
ADP: 14.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 162 581 101 24 73 6 .305
2014 Projections 148 515 87 21 66 6 .303
3 Year Average 145 518 87 22 77 6 .315
Outlook: Votto was a lightning rod for criticism among Reds fans and the local media, but for all the wrong reasons. Way too much bandwidth was spent on discussing his walk rate - as if having a .435 OBP could ever be construed as a negative! But it is true that at times he failed in high profile situations, most notably with the bases loaded. He did struggled defensively in the first half of the season. And most importantly, his power was down - his ISO dropped from .230 to .186. That last factor, combined with the absolutely horrid No. 2 hitters in front of him most of the year contributed to a steep decline in RBI, which has a tangible impact on his fantasy value. He's still an elite player in real life, but in our game those shortcomings knock him out of the first round in traditional formats.
14 Edwin Encarnacion (Tor - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 17.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 142 530 90 36 104 7 .272
2014 Projections 142 527 85 32 84 9 .273
3 Year Average 142 518 84 32 90 9 .274
Outlook: With a second big season under his belt, Encarnacion can officially be labeled as a late bloomer rather than a fluke. He followed up his breakout 2012 campaign with an impressive 2013 season that saw him slash .272/.370/.534 on the strength of 36 home runs and a 13.2% walk rate. Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of Encarnacion's profile is that he's lowered his strikeout rate in each of the last four seasons, peaking at a 10.0% mark last season. With Jose Bautista expected to enter 2014 at full health, the Blue Jays should field one of the league's most formidable lineup pairings, and Encarnacion should be primed for another huge season provided that he recovers as expected from offseason wrist surgery.
15 Prince Fielder (Tex - 1B)
DL60
ADP: 17.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 162 624 82 25 106 1 .279
2014 Projections 162 588 87 30 100 1 .303
3 Year Average 162 591 87 31 111 1 .296
Outlook: Following a disappointing 2013 campaign (by his lofty standards, at least), Fielder was traded from Detroit to Texas in a rare 1-for-1 swap of All-Star players. Fielder took a step back in multiple categories, including a drop in OPS from .940 to .819, his worst mark since becoming an everyday major leaguer. His ISO dropped to .178 – well below his career mark of .212 – but Fielder’s batted-ball rates and advanced measures of plate discipline remained similar to his career norms in most categories. The one noticeable drop came in his HR/FB ratio, which dropped to a career-low 13.5 percent. While Fielder is arguably coming off his worst season since 2006, there’s still plenty of value to be had from the big first baseman. He continued to drive in runs at an elite level, finishing fifth in the AL with 106 RBI. Fielder also continued his impressive stretch of staying injury-free, appearing in all 162 games for the third consecutive season. While Fielder’s body type may raise legitimate concern that he will decline from elite levels at a faster rate than other hitters of his ilk, the 30-year-old slugger shouldn’t be considered past his prime just yet. His immense run producing potential in a solid Rangers lineup will keep his overall fantasy value afloat and there’s a strong possibility he'll bounce back from his drop in ISO to post much better power numbers with his move from Comerica Park to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, which has historically boosted left-handed home runs.
28 Freddie Freeman (Atl - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 33.5
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 147 551 89 23 109 1 .319
2014 Projections 148 554 81 22 87 2 .292
3 Year Average 150 554 82 22 93 2 .287
Outlook: At first glance, Freeman's 2013 numbers appear to show a marked improvement from 2012, but there are reasons for skepticism. He drew just two more walks than he did in 2012, while striking out only eight fewer times. While Freeman finished second in the National League in RBI with 109, and third in the league with a .319 average, he hit .443 with runners in scoring position, and benefited greatly from a .371 BABIP. Moreover, his ISO dropped from .196 to .181, and he notched just 18 extra-base hits on the road, down from 28 in 2012. Now, all that said, Freeman hit lefties with far more consistency, improving his average against southpaws by 50 points (from .237 to .287), and his overall OPS by 101 points. Freeman didn't hit below .291 in any month of the season, and he appeared in 147 games, a number he's reached in three consecutive seasons. Still just 24 years old, Freeman is locked in at first base and likely into the three-hole in the batting order for Atlanta. While at least a slight regression in average and RBI seems inevitable, he's still an enticing fantasy option.
34 Jose Bautista (Tor - RF, 1B, CF, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 35.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: RF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 118 452 82 28 73 7 .259
2014 Projections 114 408 71 26 61 6 .245
3 Year Average 120 432 84 33 80 7 .271
Outlook: After a hip injury cut short his 2013 campaign, Bautista was given a clean bill of health in November. He has missed significant chunks of time in each of the last two seasons, but is still one of the more dangerous hitters in the game. Bautista continues to post excellent strikeout rates for a power hitter, though his consistently low line-drive rate holds down his BABIP and thus, his batting average. There was a bit of a power decline in 2013, as Bautista posted his lowest slugging percentage (.498) since breaking out in 2010. A healthy season might give Bautista a chance to match his 2010-11 level of production, though it seems more likely that he'll settle in as something a bit less than that at the age of 33. Even if he's just the player that we saw in 2012 and 2013, that would still leave Bautista as one of the better power-hitting outfielders in the American League.
37 Buster Posey (SF - C, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 32.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 148 520 61 15 72 2 .294
2014 Projections 111 413 53 13 57 1 .303
3 Year Average 114 404 52 14 65 2 .312
Outlook: Posey didn't put up numbers close to his MVP season in 2012, but he still produced at an elite level for catchers in 2013. After posting a .325 average coupled with 13 homers and 56 RBI in the first half, many thought he could repeat his numbers from 2012. But that wasn't the case as Posey completely disappeared in the second half, hitting just .244 with just two home runs and 16 RBI after the All-Star break. There was no apparent injury to report with Posey, and he actually improved his BB/K (0.96) in the second half, so it is tough to pinpoint what exactly went wrong with the All-Star catcher. Despite his second-half struggles, Posey will remain one of the most consistent options at catcher in 2014.
43 Eric Hosmer (KC - 1B)
DL15
ADP: 56.7
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 159 623 86 17 79 11 .302
2014 Projections 141 545 79 19 70 13 .305
3 Year Average 146 560 72 17 72 13 .277
Outlook: Who knows what exactly George Brett said to Hosmer when he took over as the Royals' interim hitting coach, but whatever it was, it marked the turning point for the young first baseman and transformed him from a struggling hitter barely able to maintain a .250 average to a .300 hitter with strong gap power and the added ability to hit the long ball. Even after Brett stepped down, Hosmer continued to rake and batted over .300 in each of the final four months of the season with 16 home runs in that span. At just 24 years old, Hosmer has so much more ahead of him. If he can simply maintain his current level of plate discipline and contact rates, the power should continue to develop, giving him a very strong chance to elevate his game to a higher level worthy of an eventual place among the top-10 at the first base position.
44 Albert Pujols (LAA - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 49.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 99 391 49 17 64 1 .258
2014 Projections 124 478 60 20 67 5 .247
3 Year Average 133 526 80 28 89 6 .283
Outlook: Pujols came into the 2013 season looking to atone for what was his worst statistical season in 2012. Unfortunately for Pujols, the plantar fasciitis he has dealt with for most of career became much more problematic, as the former MVP told reporters he was "dying" as a result of the pain he was feeling in his foot in April. This pain likely resulted in Pujols once again having the worst statistical year of his career, as the first baseman's numbers showed a decline across the board, and he finished the year with 17 home runs and a 116 OPS+ before he was finally shut down for good in August. While Pujols' numbers on the year may be fine for most players, they simply won't do for King Albert, who has failed to produce after signing a 10-year, $254 million contract with the Angels in December 2011. There are reasons to be optimistic heading into 2014, as Pujols resumed baseball activities early in the offseason, but it seems likely that his days of being baseball's best hitter are well behind him.
55 Joe Mauer (Min - C, 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 55.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 113 445 62 11 47 0 .324
2014 Projections 118 440 58 8 52 2 .309
3 Year Average 114 429 60 8 54 3 .312
Outlook: Mauer will move to first base in 2014 as the Twins decided it was better to keep him healthy and in the lineup after his second injury-plagued season in three years. Mauer was having his typically productive season at the plate, but with a bit more power than usual (second best home run rate of his career) before suffering a concussion in late August. He wasn't able to play again during the season, but he's said to be back to full strength heading into spring training. Mauer has outstanding plate discipline (he was third in the AL in OBP) and an ability to drive the ball to all areas of the field. Although not a prodigious home run hitter, he has a strong enough bat to still be a positive player at first base as his OPS would have ranked sixth among AL first baseman. Whether the Twins will get enough value for his $23 million annual salary without his defense and bat at catcher remains uncertain. For fantasy purposes, he'll still qualify at catcher in almost all formats in 2014, and the elimination of his injury risk – always his biggest concern – should make him perhaps the top fantasy catcher. It's also possible that Mauer may still get behind the plate for a few games as the Twins have called his move to first base a “transition” and Mauer had resisted a move before the concussion. However, it's clear that Mauer's days as an everyday catcher are over, which will hurt his fantasy value in the long run. Still, his ability to hit for average and the added boost he'll get from playing nearly every day at first base should boost his fantasy value in 2014.
59 Adrian Gonzalez (LAD - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 63.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 157 583 69 22 100 1 .293
2014 Projections 162 630 88 22 102 1 .319
3 Year Average 158 614 84 22 108 1 .311
Outlook: The Dodgers' most consistent player, Gonzalez batted .293/.342/.461 with 22 home runs in 2013. He also reached the 100-RBI mark for the sixth time in seven seasons (99 RBI in the other campaign). In his first full season with the Dodgers, Gonzalez also improved his BB/K ratio from 0.38 in 2012 to 0.48 last season. It seem unlikely he'll return to his days of hitting 35-40 home runs, but Gonzalez rarely misses a game, and in a potent lineup, he should be a lock for another .290-20-100 season.
62 Allen Craig (Bos - 1B, LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 66.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 134 508 71 13 97 2 .315
2014 Projections 104 402 63 17 77 3 .341
3 Year Average 109 392 60 15 76 3 .311
Outlook: Craig finally got a shot as a full-time player in 2013, but he wasn't able to take full advantage due to some nagging injuries that held him to 563 plate appearances. Craig's HR/FB (11.2%) rate was unusually low in 2013, which could be the result of pitchers throwing him fastballs just 28.1% of the time, down from 33.3% the season before and 37.0% in 2011. His BABIP (.368) also suggests that there may be some decline in the batting average department, although he's carried a .345 BABIP as a big leaguer thanks to a steady supply of hard contact. Craig is still in his prime at age 29, and he could have a monster season in 2014 in the heart of a potent Cardinals lineup.
63 Carlos Santana (Cle - C, 1B, 3B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 62.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 3B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 154 541 75 20 74 3 .268
2014 Projections 154 566 73 18 66 3 .228
3 Year Average 151 533 77 22 76 4 .253
Outlook: Santana's gradual move from behind the plate was accelerated with the development of Yan Gomes, but he still figures to see enough action behind the plate to qualify in most formats for at least a few more years. The power he flashed back in 2011 may have been his peak, but he's still driving in and scoring runs at a nice clip for a catcher thanks to his hold on a place in the heart of the Cleveland lineup. Santana was reportedly unhappy about yielding a significant share of time behind the plate, but the move should help him avoid the bumps and bruises that tend to mount with heavy use at the position, while also boosting his offensive numbers. Look for his playing time to come in the form of a rotation between catcher, first base and DH again in 2014.
79 Anthony Rizzo (ChC - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 111.9
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 160 606 71 23 80 6 .233
2014 Projections 94 356 41 15 44 4 .250
3 Year Average 99 357 41 13 46 4 .238
Outlook: On a team without many offensive bright spots, Rizzo has to qualify as such. Now just 24, Rizzo already has 39 home runs under his belt as he set career highs in pretty much every counting category in 2013. Unfortunately, with the increase in playing time came a serious decrease in his slash line: .233/.323/.419 is just not going to cut it for the offensive leader of any team, but the numbers are even more glaring at a position like first base. His 76:127 BB:K ratio isn't bad for a slugger, but the .259 BABIP just crushed him last year. Expect his numbers to bounce back as the BABIP normalizes and he continues his growth. Otherwise, it could be another long season at Wrigley.
84 Mark Trumbo (Ari - 1B, LF, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 94.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 159 620 85 34 100 5 .234
2014 Projections 149 591 69 32 91 6 .240
3 Year Average 151 568 72 32 94 6 .252
Outlook: At this point in his career, it's likely that what you see is what you get with Trumbo, as the righty slugger had what is rapidly becoming his typical season in 2013. Trumbo struck out a remarkable 27.1 percent of the time in 2013, but may have counteracted it somewhat by raising his walk rate to a respectable 8.0 percent. As we know by now, however, the story of Trumbo is his big-time power, as he posted an ISO of .219, and hit 34 home runs in 2013. His final slash line still leaves more to be desired (.234/.294/.453), but he did reach the 100-RBI plateau for the first time in his career. Traded to Arizona in December, Trumbo will serve as the D-Backs' regular left fielder and combine with the Paul Goldschmidt to form a devastating duo in the middle of the Diamondbacks' order.
96 Jonathan Lucroy (Mil - C, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 108.8
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 147 521 59 18 82 9 .280
2014 Projections 108 423 48 13 61 4 .286
3 Year Average 126 422 50 14 66 5 .284
Outlook: Though his name doesn’t often come up when discussing the top hitting catchers in the league, Lucroy finished the 2013 season with the ninth best OPS among catchers who saw at least 400 plate appearances, and more impressively, the most RBI. Each of Lucroy’s slash numbers dipped from the previous season, but he played in a career-best 147 games and showed good power with 49 extra-base hits overall. Lucroy figures to bat in the middle third of the Brewers’ order, and his power production could be a bargain for fantasy owners in the mid-to-later rounds.
102 Billy Butler (KC - DH, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 156.3
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 162 582 62 15 82 0 .289
2014 Projections 162 619 67 20 84 1 .283
3 Year Average 161 598 69 21 95 1 .298
Outlook: With expectations riding high after a breakout season in 2012, Butler disappointed his owners last year with a failed encore performance. He maintained his typically strong plate discipline, and even posted higher contact rates, but with an increase in groundballs that came at the expense of his flyball rate, his power suffered, and he hit just 15 home runs. The rest of his game, however, remained largely unchanged, as he still hit .289 and had 82 RBI in a season in which most of the Royals' hitters struggled at the plate. He even increased his walk rate and cut down on his strikeouts, which helped to maintain an impressive .374 on-base percentage. While a return of at least some of the power would make drafting Country Breakfast a little more appetizing in 2014, he still remains a fantastic option in the corner infield with even more value in leagues that count OBP instead of average.
106 Brian McCann (NYY - C, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 98.2
CHG: 0.0
Depth: C-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 102 356 43 20 57 0 .256
2014 Projections 115 442 48 22 65 2 .253
3 Year Average 117 420 46 21 65 2 .252
Outlook: Upon his return from offseason shoulder surgery in early May, McCann was blazing hot, with six home runs in his first 16 games. He had 12 homers by the All-Star break despite missing the first 30 games, but fizzled after the intermission, slashing just .220/.296/.384 over his final 177 at-bats. Still, McCann finished with 20 home runs, marking his sixth consecutive season reaching that number. McCann's 9.7 percent walk rate was in line with his career average (9.5 percent), but his strikeout rate jumped back up to 16.4 percent, up from 12.5 percent in 2012. At this point, the baseball world knows who McCann is; a powerful, pull-hitting, veteran backstop with above-average on-base skills, and the Yankees shelled out $85 million to acquire his services in the offseason. It's a perfect fit for both the Yankees, who relied on the likes of Francisco Cervelli and Chris Stewart last season, and McCann, as the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium should keep the power numbers coming. Further, he'll have the flexibility to work as a DH on days where the Yankees want to give him a respite from catching.
119 Jose Abreu (CWS - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 144.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2014 Projections 118 467 52 18 60 0 .268
3 Year Average 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Outlook: Abreu enters 2014 as one of the bigger mysteries of the season. The newest Cuban superstar to make the trek to MLB is a bit different than the other recent players to defect. He is less athletic than Yasiel Puig and Yoenis Cespedes, and he is also quite a bit older than Puig and a year older than Cespedes was upon his arrival two seasons ago. However, Abreu does come to the states with more alleged raw power. He hit 37 home runs in back-to-back Cuban seasons, and he hit .342/.457/.621 over 799 career games in that league. The scouting reports vary in terms of how those numbers will translate to the big leagues, and some question how he will fare against major league breaking balls. He excelled in the 2013 World Baseball Classic with three home runs and a 1.145 OPS in 25 at-bats. The variance on his projections will likely be great, but he should be projected to start at first and bat somewhere in the middle-third of the White Sox's lineup.
134 Brandon Belt (SF - 1B)
DL7
ADP: 180.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 150 509 76 17 67 5 .289
2014 Projections 120 458 56 13 54 7 .260
3 Year Average 119 369 48 11 47 7 .274
Outlook: It was a tale of two seasons for Belt in 2013, as he got off to a slow start, while being hampered by an illness and a minor neck injury. He really turned things around after the All-Star break, though, putting together an impressive .326/.390/.525 line in 247 second-half plate appearances. Just when we thought we had Belt figured out –- a patient hitter with light power and light speed -- he showed a spike in power, with a .193 ISO this past season compared to .146 in 2012. The improvement in the power department may not be a fluke, as his HR/FB ratio in 2013 was a maintainable 10.6 percent and was actually lower than the 15.8 percent he posted when he burst onto the scene in 2011. Because of the disparity between his first and second halves, Belt will likely be a polarizing asset come draft day, but there is upside here, if he continues to build on the expanded power output that he displayed last season.
139 Matt Adams (StL - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 172.6
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 108 296 46 17 51 0 .284
2014 Projections 119 472 65 22 76 0 .269
3 Year Average 68 191 27 10 32 0 .272
Outlook: Adams had a very good 2013 in limited playing time, slamming 17 home runs and 14 doubles in just 319 plate appearances. His BABIP (.337) was somewhat high, meaning his .284 average could fall with a larger sample size, but Adams still makes plenty of hard contact, as evidenced by his .220 ISO. The power is here for Adams to be a 30-homer bat, but it might not happen in 2014, as his HR/FB (21.8%) may not be completely sustainable. That being said, it appears Allen Craig will play primarily in right field this season following the departure of Carlos Beltran, which should result in a significant increase in opportunities for Adams compared to last season. As the Cardinals' primary first baseman, Adams will have a good chance to crack the 500 at-bat plateau.
148 Brandon Moss (Oak - 1B, LF, RF)
Healthy
ADP: 174.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: LF-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 145 446 73 30 87 4 .256
2014 Projections 62 236 39 15 39 1 .258
3 Year Average 78 239 40 17 46 2 .268
Outlook: Moss followed up his breakout 21 home-run season in 2012 with a 30 home-run campaign in 2013 and finished sixth in the AL with a .522 slugging percentage. The batting average dropped from .291 in 2012 to .256 in 2013 and he struck out 140 times, but Moss ended 2013 with a very strong .859 OPS. The biggest positive is how Moss responded to his struggles in the first half of the season. Moss was hitting .228 at the All-Star break, but turned his year around with a second-half average of .296 and a second-half OPS of .989 (second only to Mike Trout in the AL). Moss struggles against lefties, but the A's sit him in a lot of matchups against them, which will protect his averages. Moss is an extreme flyball hitter and he had the lowest GB/FB ratio in the American League last season. He will begin 2014 as the A's starting first baseman and will play against all righties while providing cheap power in that role.
153 Mark Teixeira (NYY - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 184.4
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2013 Season 15 53 5 3 12 0 .151
2014 Projections 97 355 54 22 61 1 .245
3 Year Average 98 364 54 22 69 2 .245
Outlook: Teixeira was never able to bounce back from the wrist injury he suffered during the WBC, but he was a player in decline even before the injury, as his pull-happy ways combined with teams' increased willingness to shift against him led to three straight years of batting averages around .250. Teixeira should be good to go following an offseason of rehab, and when healthy, he remains a 30-homer threat. However, wrist injuries have a tendency to sap power, and there is no guarantee that Teixeira will return to form even after the long layoff.
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