Pre-Draft Player Rankings

4 Paul Goldschmidt (Ari - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 6.0
CHG: 0.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 579 106 24 95 32 .297
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 142 517 95 25 91 21 .308
Outlook: If a .297/.411/.489 slash line with 24 home runs and 95 RBI can be considered a down year, then you know just how good Goldschmidt has been across his six MLB seasons. In 2015, Goldschmidt slashed an absurd .321/.435/.570 with 33 home runs and 110 RBI. Expecting a repeat of those numbers might have been unfair, but that is the standard Goldschmidt has set. On a positive note, he scored 106 runs in 2016, up from 103 in 2015. He also went from 21 stolen bases in 2015 to 32 in 2016. It is his speed and base-stealing acumen that really makes Goldschmidt a special player in fantasy. It is unclear if he will run as much under new manager Torey Lovullo, but considering he upped his success rate from 80.8 percent to 86.5 percent last season, it seems likely that he will have the green light more often than not. Coming off that "down" year, Goldschmidt is no longer a lock to go in the top-five, but he is the clear top player at his position and still has all the tools to finish the year as a top-five player in fantasy.
10 Anthony Rizzo (ChC - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 11.2
CHG: +0.1
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 155 583 94 32 109 3 .292
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 152 564 92 32 96 8 .285
Outlook: Coming off consecutive 30-home-run seasons, Rizzo entered the year with lofty expectations and met them. He tied his career high of 32 big flies and set new career highs in RBI and batting average. While he was unable to replicate the 17 steals he put up in 2015, it now seems like a crazy anomaly considering he only has 19 steals over his five major league seasons excluding that season. Rizzo is clearly one of the league's better power hitters, finishing in the top 20 in slugging percentage each of the last three seasons. He's also a consistently disciplined hitter, taking at least 73 walks each of the last four seasons. At 27 years old, Rizzo is entering his prime and figures to be hitting in the middle of a potent lineup for years to come considering the plethora of young hitting talent the Cubs have. While he won't be the first fantasy pick, Rizzo won't last long on draft boards in 2017.
11 Miguel Cabrera (Det - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 12.5
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 595 92 38 108 0 .316
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 145 545 86 27 98 1 .321
Outlook: All of a sudden, Cabrera is 34 years old. You would never know it by his statistical production as 2016 was another tremendous year at the plate. He continues to be the best slugger in the game who rarely gets himself out. After playing just 119 games in 2015 due to ankle and calf injuries, Cabrera stayed relatively healthy last season. He also reversed several minor worrisome trends at the plate as his isolated power bounced back to career norms (to .247 from .196 in 2015) and he hit 38 home runs to end a three-year decline in homers. While he's entering his mid-30s, his injury track record is strong, having played fewer than 150 games just once in his career. He's so good at what he does he is almost boring at this point, but spending a first rounder on him is money in the bank.
18 Edwin Encarnación (Cle - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 18.6
CHG: -0.1
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 160 601 99 42 127 2 .263
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 145 535 89 38 112 2 .269
Outlook: With free agency looming, Encarnacion managed to put together his most productive campaign at the age of 33. In his 12th major league season, the slugger piled up career highs in runs (99), hits (158), extra-base hits (76), RBI (127) and walks (87) while tying his career-best mark of 42 home runs. His 19.7 percent strikeout rate was his worst mark since 2009, but of the eight players with 40 home runs last year, only Nolan Arenado posted a lower strikeout rate (14.8 percent), so he remains excellent at making contact relative to his contemporaries. Nelson Cruz's move from Baltimore to Seattle serves as a recent example of how the importance of a home ballpark can often be overstated when talking about the elite sluggers in the game. Encarnacion's move to Cleveland in the offseason might provide a similar narrative, as Progressive Field skewed more favorably for both runs and power than Rogers Centre did in 2016.
26 Freddie Freeman (Atl - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 31.4
CHG: -0.6
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 589 102 34 91 6 .302
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 146 537 86 23 78 4 .291
Outlook: In a year where many players set career highs in homers, Freeman nearly matched his total from the previous two seasons combined. He was healthy all year and had 83 extra-base hits and hit over .300 despite a 25 percent strikeout rate. The power spike came from two areas: a 41 percent flyball rate and 44 percent hard-contact rate, both career highs. While lefties and righties did not pose any issues for him in terms of average (.303 vs RHP; .301 vs LHP), 27 of his 34 home runs came against righties and his strikeout rate against southpaws was 28 percent versus 23 percent against righties. He has failed to drive in 100 runs for three consecutive seasons due to injury as well as questionable talent around him, but both showed signs of improvement in 2016.
28 Joey Votto (Cin - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 30.2
CHG: -0.4
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 556 101 29 97 8 .326
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 126 440 76 21 67 7 .309
Outlook: Votto was a little slow to heat up in 2016, but once he did, he was the hottest star in the baseball universe. After batting .229 and .200 in April and May, respectively, Votto went on to post these marks in the subsequent four months: .319, .413, .394, .395. He easily led all qualifying hitters in average (.408), on-base percentage (.490) and slugging (.668) during the second half of the season, walking 15 more times than he struck out after the All-Star break while adding 15 homers. Now that he's two full seasons removed from the quad issues that led to the only down year of his career, Votto is firmly back among the safest options in fantasy baseball. His success isn't lineup-dependent either, as evidenced by his stellar counting stats in 2016 despite a lackluster supporting cast. There will be younger, sexier options in the first two rounds of drafts, but few can provide the peace of mind that Votto does.
36 José Abreu (CWS - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 43.9
CHG: -1.2
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 159 624 67 25 100 0 .293
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 153 598 78 30 103 1 .299
Outlook: After three seasons, Abreu's name feels as if it has more value than his actual numbers. His 2014 season was outstanding, and 2015 was pretty good as well, but 2016 feels like a disappointment. Sure, he drove in 100 runs, taking advantage of the opportunities provided to him and hit .293. Yet, in a year where many were hitting 20-plus homers, Abreu hit 25 despite missing only three games all year. His Isolated Power and HR/FB ratio has declined each season he has been in the majors. His GB/FB rate has always been high, but he got away with it when he was hitting one out of every four or five flyballs out of the yard. Last season, that fell to one in every six flyballs which caps his power upside. All the pieces are there, but he has to get more distance on his batted balls to get back to the 30-homer plateau.
44 Wil Myers (SD - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 56.0
CHG: -1.0
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 157 599 99 28 94 28 .259
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 101 383 59 14 53 13 .248
Outlook: Myers played a career-high 157 games, after two injury-plagued seasons in 2014 and 2015 when he logged just 147 games combined, and the results were better than perhaps anyone could have imagined. Narrowly missing the 30-homer, 30-steal club, and falling just short of 100 runs scored and 100 RBI, Myers was a profitable piece for fantasy owners in 2016, while serving as the Padres' best offensive player. Of some concern, however, is that he faded in the second half. Myers hit 19 of his 28 homers in his first 87 games, while hitting nine in his last 70 contests, and his strikeout rate jumped from 20.6 percent in the first half to 27.6 percent in the second half, while his OPS fell from .873 to .697. Overall, Myers displayed improved skills in many facets, using the opposite field more frequently, and posting a career-low 8.0 percent swinging-strike rate that bodes well for his chances of maintaining something more in line with his first-half strikeout rate going forward, and the Padres' aggressive tendencies on the basepaths seem unlikely to change this season.
55 Chris Davis (Bal - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 69.7
CHG: +0.3
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 157 566 99 38 84 1 .221
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 148 530 88 37 91 2 .228
Outlook: Davis hit 38 homers last year, and we should be happy with that, but that's so 2015. In a year where many players set career highs in homers and second baseman were going yard 30 times, Davis had a normal power year for him. That was not a good thing because outside of scoring 99 runs, he did not do anything else well at all. He drove in just 84 and his batting average returned to the sub-optimal range albeit not below the Mendoza Line like in 2014. At this stage of his career, Davis' skills are stable. He will hit for more power than most and will produce runs in bunches when he gets on one of his power hot streaks, but he is very unlikely to hit for average. Good luck predicting his batting average given there has been 90 points of variance in it over the past four seasons. The three true outcomes are consistent for him but everything else is quite fluid.
58 Daniel Murphy (Was - 2B, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 50.7
CHG: +0.2
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 142 531 88 25 104 5 .347
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 138 542 74 16 78 7 .304
Outlook: The adjustments Murphy made at the plate that turned him into a playoff hero in 2015 with the Mets weren't just a short-sample mirage after all. He continued to hit balls harder (career-high 38.2 percent hard-hit rate), higher (career-high 41.9 percent flyball rate) and farther (career-high average of 280.6 feet on flyballs) than he ever had before, resulting in -- you guessed it -- a career year that landed him in second place in NL MVP voting. Pitchers weren't able to find a hole in his new approach as the season progressed either, as his first half and second half splits were almost identical, right down to the .985 OPS in both halves. The only thing that slowed him down was a leg injury that limited him to 55 games in the second half, but he was still healthy enough to hit .438 in 16 postseason at-bats. Nagging lower-body injuries are definitely a red flag for a 31-year-old second baseman, especially one that didn't really have a step to lose, and the 21 games Murphy played at first base last year may have been a precursor to a more permanent move, especially if Ryan Zimmerman never returns to form. The offense Murphy supplied in 2016 is more than adequate for a shift down the defensive spectrum, though, even if it's taken on faith that he'll have some regression in his performance, despite the strong indications to the contrary.
73 Eric Hosmer (KC - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 94.0
CHG: -1.3
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 605 80 25 104 5 .266
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 149 569 77 17 85 5 .278
Outlook: Hosmer set a career high in homers and RBI in 2016, but then, who didn't? It's cliche, but the increased total was a matter of doubles and triples turning into homers, as his extra-base hits, slugging and isolated power all dropped. Hosmer's flyball percentage remained a low 25 percent; a 6.3 percent spike in HR/FB did the trick. The first baseman set another career high, fanning at nearly a 20 percent pace. This, in tandem with a low BABIP, especially against southpaws, led to his posting his second lowest batting average as a big leaguer (.266). All that said, Hosmer had a typical campaign, piggybacking the league trend of increased power and whiffs. He remains a fallback choice at first base, without the power usually attributed to the position but a volume contributor due to durability and an above average hit tool. If you miss out on the studs early, Hosmer remains a reliable consolation prize with a likely bounce-back in batting average, albeit with a drop in pop.
76 Matt Carpenter (StL - 3B, 1B, 2B)
Healthy
ADP: 76.8
CHG: -0.1
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 129 473 81 21 68 0 .271
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 147 547 94 19 70 3 .272
Outlook: Consistency has been the name of the game for Carpenter, who recorded a batting average above the .270 mark for the third consecutive season. While this has become expected from the 30-year-old, he drastically improved his patience at the plate. As a result, he finished the season with a .380 on-base percentage and was regularly the club's leadoff hitter. Naturally, the switch to hitting first came with a drop in RBI as he knocked in just 68 runs, nearly 20 fewer than he did in 2015, but he could move back down in the order following the addition of Dexter Fowler. He'll be highly valuable no matter where he hits in the order. It's worth noting that Carpenter dealt with an oblique injury that landed him on the disabled list for nearly a month in the second half of the season, but if he can stay healthy, Carpenter should have no problem reaching 20 home runs for the third straight year.
79 Carlos Santana (Cle - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 108.1
CHG: -1.4
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 158 582 89 34 87 5 .259
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 155 558 76 27 86 7 .240
Outlook: Santana set career highs in homers, runs, and RBI while tipping his batting average over the league average for the first time in three seasons. His days of playing up the defensive spectrum are done, but he returned to hitting with the power fantasy owners like to see from first basemen. His RBI production dipped as he spent most of his time hitting leadoff, thanks to his abilities to work counts and accept walks (.365 career OBP). Those skills are always going to ensure he hits in the top half of the lineup, and he has been durable, racking up six consecutive seasons of 600 or more plate appearances. While a switch hitter, the power comes from the left side, as 30 of his 34 homers last year were as a lefty and 77 percent of his career homers are as a lefty. As long as prospective owners realize his potential pitfalls -- mainly a batting average that could be on the wrong side of .250 -- he'll deliver, even more so in OBP leagues.
96 Hanley Ramírez (Bos - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 112.0
CHG: -0.4
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 147 549 81 30 111 9 .286
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 127 466 68 21 78 10 .275
Outlook: Ramirez returned to form in 2016, moving to first base, the veteran batted .288 in the first half of the season, although he only hit eight home runs and slugged .435. He turned the page in the second half, though, belting 22 home runs and driving in 63 runs. His second-half surge brought his slugging percentage up to .505, his best mark since his injury-shortened 2013 campaign with the Dodgers. He only qualifies at first base heading into 2017, and while there had been speculation that he would take over for David Ortiz as the team's everyday DH this season, a slew of offseason moves now make it seem possible that Ramirez will start at first base against lefties, spelling Mitch Moreland. This would allow Ramirez to retain first base eligibility in most formats, which would be important for his value in keeper leagues. He is a good bet to offer four-category production with a handful of steals thrown in, hitting in the middle of a loaded Red Sox lineup.
97 Adrián González (LAD - 1B)
DTD
ADP: 148.8
CHG: -0.8
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 156 568 69 18 90 0 .285
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 157 577 76 24 99 0 .279
Outlook: It's tempting to write a player off when he's well into his 30s and coming off a career-worst season at the plate, but not every player follows a predictable parabola of performance as he ages. The truth is that Gonzalez hasn't been a significant power source in five years -- his last SLG above .500 was in 2011, while his last 30-HR season was in 2010 -- but his continual placement in the middle of the Dodgers' batting order has led to some lofty RBI totals (396 RBI over the last four years). The Dodgers have Gonzalez for another two years and $43 million, so he might keep racking up RBI totals in the middle of the lineup, but his production in the other categories continues to be marginalized by the breadth and depth of the first base position, particularly in the modern era of over-the-fence baseball. The biggest threat to Gonzalez's counting stats is Cody Bellinger, a powerful first base prospect in the Dodgers' system who is charging fast.
128 Albert Pujols (LAA - 1B, DH)
DTD
ADP: 153.4
CHG: -0.3
Depth: DH-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 152 593 71 31 119 4 .268
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 156 609 82 33 106 5 .261
Outlook: After having offseason surgery on his right foot, Pujols' availability for Opening Day was in question. Not only did the future Hall-of-Famer play the first 70 games of the 2016 campaign, he amassed at least 650 plate appearances for the seventh time in eight seasons. Along the way, Pujols fought through ankle and hamstring woes, along with more foot issues, costing him the final five games of the year. Playing in the field for only 28 games helped Pujols while giving him first base fantasy eligibility for another year, possibly his last before he joins the DH-only ranks. At the plate, Pujols had what's become a typical season: excellent contact rate and decent power with a batting average significantly down from his St. Louis years. He had surgery in December to address the plantar fascia in his foot, and may miss some spring training games as a result, but the hope is that he will be ready for Opening Day with the nagging ailment behind him. He's still a source of cheap homers and RBI, so long as Mike Trout hits in front of him.
148 Brandon Belt (SF - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 182.7
CHG: -0.2
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 156 542 77 17 82 0 .275
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 118 416 60 16 59 4 .272
Outlook: Belt took another step forward as a professional hitter in 2016, but it was tough to notice from a fantasy perspective. The noticeable improvement was in his plate discipline, finishing with a .394 on-base percentage, good enough for fourth among all first basemen. Unless his owners participated in leagues that count on-base percentage, then they were likely left wanting more from Belt. He'll never be the power threat many thought he would be when he broke into the league, but he will get on-base at an elite clip and provide mid-level counting stats. The only potential for improvement would be if manager Bruce Bochy elects to move him to second in the batting order (something he experimented with for seven games last season), or if he begins to steal bases again. The former would create more potential for runs if he can get on in front of Buster Posey, Hunter Pence and Brandon Crawford.
151 Tommy Joseph (Phi - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 189.3
CHG: -0.9
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 107 315 47 21 47 1 .257
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 107 315 47 21 47 1 .257
Outlook: Joseph was outrighted off the Phillies 40-man roster after the 2015 season, but he went unclaimed and looked to prove himself as a first baseman after years of missed at-bats in the minors due to the numerous concussions he suffered while catching. He produced immediately after a mid-May promotion to the big leagues, hitting .323 with seven home runs and a 1.010 OPS in his first 21 games while leaping Ryan Howard on the depth chart. Joseph slumped badly from mid-June into early July as pitchers adjusted to him by throwing more offspeed stuff. He adjusted back, hitting .259 with 10 home runs and an .829 OPS over 162 at-bats in the second half. Joseph walked at a 3.7 percent clip in the first half, but improved that to 8.6 percent while also cutting his strikeout rate from 24.7 percent to 18.9 percent after the All-Star break. Joseph was lethal against lefties last season, and more than held his own against righties. With Ryan Howard out of the picture, Joseph could offer 30-homer pop in his first full season as the everyday first baseman.
169 Greg Bird (NYY - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 196.4
CHG: +0.1
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season -- -- -- -- -- -- --
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 46 157 26 11 31 0 .261
Outlook: Bird showed promise in 2015 when a season-ending injury to Mark Teixeira thrust the then 22-year-old into a starting role for a playoff team. He smacked 11 home runs with a .268 ISO in 46 games, but unfortunately, he didn't get a chance to build on that campaign. Bird's 2016 season ended before it even began with shoulder surgery in February. He returned to action in the Arizona Fall League, but hit just .215 with one home run in 17 games. With Teixeira now out of the picture, Bird is in position to open up the season as the everyday first baseman. The lefty's power will be a natural fit with the short porch in right field at Yankee Stadium, but he'll need to find a way to cut down on his strikeouts to really take the next step forward (29.8 percent strikeout rate in 2015).
186 Justin Bour (Mia - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 210.1
CHG: -0.3
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 90 280 35 15 51 0 .264
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 86 254 29 13 45 0 .264
Outlook: A preseason favorite of many to build on his breakout 2015 campaign, Bour was headed in that direction before an ankle injury forced him to the disabled list in early July. At the time, he had slugged 15 homers, pacing past the previous season's 23. Bour was activated in early September, appearing in 22 more contests but failed to add onto his homer total. In fact, he swatted only three extra-base hits in the last month. The lefty has slugged all 38 of his home runs off righty throwers the last two seasons, which largely explains why he's strictly a platoon player. Keep in mind that the right field fences in Marlins Park were brought in and lowered prior to the 2016 season. The venue still depresses lefty power but not to the same extent as before. Bour should again be a target for those looking for cheap power at corner or utility without dampening batting average.
187 Chris Carter (NYY - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 205.2
CHG: -0.4
Depth: --
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 160 549 84 41 94 3 .222
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 145 482 67 34 82 3 .218
201 Mike Napoli (Tex - 1B, DH)
Healthy
ADP: 205.4
CHG: +0.4
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 150 557 92 34 101 5 .239
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 134 460 62 23 69 4 .237
203 Brad Miller (TB - SS, 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 194.3
CHG: -0.5
Depth: 2B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 152 548 73 30 81 6 .243
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 140 451 55 17 54 8 .242
Outlook: Miller exploded for a career season in 2016, posting personal bests in doubles (29), triples (six), homers (30) and RBI (81). He also handled a move away from his shortstop position graciously after the acquisition of Matt Duffy, and he heads into the spring as the starting first baseman. He saw encouraging bumps in several other metrics as well, including HR/FB (20.4 percent), which he nearly doubled over the previous season, and hard contact rate, which he raised from 30.3 percent to 35.1 percent. It will be intriguing to see if the power surge was simply an outlier or a harbinger of things to come for Miller, who'd previously topped out at 11 homers in 2015. It's notable that his strikeout rate also saw a rise in 2016, with his 24.8 percent figure last season representing a career high, so Miller has room for offering even greater fantasy production if he can make even just a slight improvement in his contact rate.
224 C.J. Cron (LAA - 1B)
Healthy
ADP: 219.6
CHG: +0.2
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 116 407 51 16 69 2 .278
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 103 342 39 14 52 2 .266
Outlook: Cron took over as the Halos' primary first baseman but was sidelined about six weeks after breaking his hand in early July. His skills continued to trend in the right direction, as he whiffed less and walked more for the second straight season. However, his 5.4 percent walk rate is still far too low, especially if Cron wants to hit in the meat of the order. Cron's power ticked up, but it was mostly an increase in doubles as he matched 2015's home run output in 40 more plate appearances. Chron has actually had more success against right-handed pitching in his career (.789 OPS) than lefties (.694 OPS) . As such, there's room for growth if his numbers improve versus southpaws. For those who miss out on a stud first baseman early, Cron makes for a perfect fallback option with a solid floor and intriguing power upside.
243 Lucas Duda (NYM - 1B)
DTD
ADP: 219.3
CHG: -0.5
Depth: 1B-1
G AB R HR RBI SB AVG
2016 Season 47 153 20 7 23 0 .229
2017 Projections -- -- -- -- -- -- --
3 Year Average 112 379 54 21 63 1 .245
Outlook: What first appeared to be a balky back ended up costing Duda nearly four months of 2016 season. The veteran first baseman was off to a slow start, slashing .231/.297/.431 with seven homers when he was placed on the DL on May 20. Duda returned on Sept. 20, hitting just .217 with no homers in 23 at-bats the rest of the way. While the sample of games Duda played in 2016 is too small to alter his performance baseline, it's imperative to note the veteran missed time the last week of the season due to a sore back and was not active for the Mets' wild card tilt. So, what we have is a power-hitting first baseman who's a batting average liability on the wrong side of 30 years old, coming off a severe back injury that was still bothersome after missing four months or action. If healthy, Duda still has the pop to hit 30 homers but the injury risk means it's best to earmark him for a corner or utility spot, with a backup on reserve.
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